1 Corinthians 4:4-5

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by WestminsterMan, Mar 23, 2011.

  1. WestminsterMan

    WestminsterMan
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    1 Corinthians 4:4-5 (New International Version, ©2011)

    4 My conscience is clear, but that does not make me innocent. It is the Lord who judges me. 5 Therefore judge nothing before the appointed time; wait until the Lord comes. He will bring to light what is hidden in darkness and will expose the motives of the heart. At that time each will receive their praise from God.

    Whats your take on this passage?

    WM
     
  2. Zenas

    Zenas
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    I know this is off topic but I just can't resist. The quoted portion of the O.P. demonstrates just one of many things wrong with the NIV. "Each" is singular. "Their" is plural. In many cases the NIV botches the grammar of its breezy pseudo translation. It should say, "Each will receive his praise from God." If you think that is sexist, it could say "Each will receive his or her praise from God." Now, WM, I will ponder your question and post an answer soon.
     
  3. annsni

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    I do believe it's speaking of judging the motives of someone. We can't know motives - but God will make it all clear one day.
     
  4. Dr. Walter

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    The saved man is still a man with a depraved nature and incapable of completely knowing the depth of his own heart and therefore the only one qualified to judge our motives is God. If this is true in regard to our own motives, how much more so in any attempt by us to judge the motives of others. Only the Omniscient God on judgment day will be able to properly reveal our own motives as well as the motives of others.
     
  5. Zenas

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    I agree with this. Also, Paul may have found it necessary to raise this point to show the difference between God's way and the way of the Stoic philosopher Seneca. Seneca was a contemporary of Paul's and held enormous influence over First Century thought in the Western Roman Empire. He believed and taught that every man was the judge of his own actions.
     
  6. ReformedBaptist

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    It means that all our posts on the BB will be judged according to our motives. :tongue3:
     
  7. WestminsterMan

    WestminsterMan
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    Then we are all done for!

    WM
     
  8. Logos57

    Logos57
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    I believe Paul is telling us that yes, we are to judge others fruit(s), by the Spirit (I Corinthians 2:15; Matthew 7:13-23), but don't judge others unwisely for even the best of believers will have low moments of sinfulness, that can fool us. A false prophet or a false believer will not show any good fruit at all (Luke 8:7,14 seed of thorns, or false believers whereas Luke 8:8,15 is the seed on the good ground). But we don't always know the heart of the manner so unless the Spirit guides do not judge others.
     
  9. TrevorL

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    Greetings WestminsterMan,
    I agree with Dr Walter’s general explanation.

    Also the words of Paul are still in the context of the party factions that had arisen in Corinth, where each of them had divided in support of Paul, Apollos, Cephas or Christ 1:10-12. In order to justify their acceptance or rejection of Paul or Apollos they would have spoken of the motives of these two brethren, some judging Paul, others Apollos. Paul seeks to replace their thinking and correct them by drawing attention to both the example of himself and Apollos as servants of Christ 4:1.

    Kind regards
    Trevor
     

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