1850 revision of the KJV

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Craigbythesea, Mar 5, 2005.

  1. Craigbythesea

    Craigbythesea
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    On many websites I read that the 1850 revision of the KJV is the current revision, but I have not been able to locate a copy of this revision or any information about who did the revision and who published it. In 1850 a revision of the KJV New Testament by Spencer Cone and William Wyckoff was published in which the word “baptism” was changed to “immersion,” but this is not the same thing nor what I am seeking information about. I have the 1762 Cambridge revision by Thomas Paris, and the 1769 Oxford revision by Benjamin Blayney, and many other minor revisions, but the 1850 revision eludes me. Any information about this edition of the KJV would be appreciated. Thank you.

    Note: I have the E-Sword copy of the 1850 revision, but I need information about who did the revision and who published it and any other information that I can get.

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  2. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    Alexander McClure indicated that the 1769 KJV was "the standard edition" until one was published in 1806 by Eyre and Strahan, printers to his Majesty (KJV TRANSLATORS REVIVED, p. 223).
    Darlow and Moule reported: "Elaborate precautions were taken to secure the accuracy of this [1806] edition" (HISTORICAL CATALOGUE, p. 321).

    I haven't come across to any references to a special 1850 edition of the KJV outside of KJV-only claims.

    F. H. A. Scrivener adopted as the standard copy of the KJV for his study: the Cambridge 8 vol. edition 1858 (AUTHORIZED EDITION OF THE ENGLISH BIBLE, p. 38). It might be that the 1850 date was first a misprint or typing error for this 1858 date, and the misprint was repeated by various other KJV-only advocates.

    Another possible source of this 1850 date
    is as a misprint of a date in a statement by
    Peter Ruckman. Ruckman wrote: "At this writing, it is the Standard Edition, Octavo Reference Bible of 1852, as established by Gardiner Spring, Thomas Cook, Samuel H. Turner, Edward Robinson, Thomas Vermilye, John McClintock, and Richard S. Storrs, Jr." (DIFFERENCES IN KJV EDITIONS, p. 19).
    I think that this 1852 standard edition was the one produced by the American Bible Society as their standard edition for six years before being withdrawn after protests, and it is no longer being printed. The present ABS edition may again
    have some renderings in agreement with it, but their present ABS edition is not identical to this 1852 edition.

    By the way, where did you obtain a copy of the 1762 Cambridge and 1769 Oxford? Do you have a copy of the original editions of them?
     
  3. gopchad

    gopchad
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    Just buy a Cambridge Bible, and you'll have a copy. I have a nice genuine leather text only that I use as my everyday preaching Bible. I like it because the cover and binding are the nicest of any Bible I have ever seen, and you can usually find one for less than $50, I only paid $30 off a clearance rack at a family bookstores.

    Chad
     
  4. Logos1560

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    In checking again, I find that the origin of
    the 1850 date may be from a statement by
    Peter Ruckman.

    Ruckman wrote: "In taking seven revised
    copies of the AV (1611, 1613, 1644, 1701,
    1769, and 1850) that result in a purified
    Book" (DIFFERENCES IN THE KING JAMES VERSION
    EDITIONS, pp. 18-19).

    I don't know where his 1850 date comes
    from since I do not notice that he discusses
    or mentions any actual 1850 edition.
     
  5. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    Just buy a Cambridge Bible, and you'll have a copy.

    Chad
    </font>[/QUOTE]Actually, present Cambridge editions of the KJV are not identical to the 1762 Cambridge edition. For example, present Cambridge editions
    include many of the revisions made by Blayney in the 1769 Oxford edition.

    David Norton indicated that Cambridge University Press silently abandoned the 1762 edition as "it followed the one proclaimed standard, Oxford's, almost entirely" (TEXTUAL HISTORY OF THE KJB, pp. 125-126).

    I have a copy of a present-day Cambridge edition
    identified as a "standard text edition."
     

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