2 Timothy 2:15

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by Chet, Feb 3, 2002.

  1. Chet

    Chet
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    NIV = Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly handles the word of truth.


    KJV = Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.


    NKJV = Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.


    NASU = Be diligent to present yourself approved to God as a workman who does not need to be ashamed, accurately handling the word of truth.


    (ESV) = Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.


    (RSV) = Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a workman who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth.


    (NLT) = Work hard so God can approve you. Be a good worker, one who does not need to be ashamed and who correctly explains the word of truth.

    KJV-Study

    from Strongs
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>NT:4704 spoudazo (spoo-dad'-zo); from NT:4710; to use speed, i.e. to make effort, be prompt or earnest: KJV - do (give) diligence, be diligent (forward), endeavour, labour, study.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    from Thayer's Greek Lexicon
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>NT:4704 spoudazoo;
    a. to hasten, make haste: 2 Tim 4:9,21;
    b. to exert oneself, endeavor, give difference: followed by an infinitive, Gal 2:10<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    from Spiros Zodhiates
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>spudazo from spoude (4710), earnestness, diligence (2 Pet 1:5) To be diligent, earnest or eager.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Comparing the different readings of spoudazo in the KJV then the ESV.

    Ephesians 4:3 (KJV) = Endeavouring
    1 Thessalonians 2:17 (KJV) = endeavoured
    2 Timothy 4:9 = (KJV) Do thy diligence
    2 Timothy 4:21 = (KJV) Do thy diligence
    Titus 3:12 = (KJV) be diligent
    Hebrews 4:11 = (KJV) Let us labour
    2 Peter 1:15 = (KJV) will endeavour
    2 Peter 3:14 = (KJV) be diligent

    Ephes. 4:3 (ESV) = eager
    1 Thes. 2:17 (ESV) = endeavored the more eagerly
    2 Tim. 4:9 (ESV) = Do your best
    2 Tim. 4:21 (ESV) = Do your best
    Titus 3:12 (ESV) = do your best
    Hebrews 4:11 (ESV) = strive to enter that rest,
    2 Peter 1:15 (ESV) = make every effort
    2 Peter 3:14 (ESV) = be diligent

    KJV - Rightly divide

    from Strongs
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>NT:3718
    orthotomeo (or-thot-om-eh'-o); from a compound of NT:3717 and the base of NT:5114,
    to make a straight cut, i.e. (figuratively) to dissect (expound) correctly (the divine
    message): KJV - rightly divide.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    from Thayer's Greek Lexicon
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>3718 orthotomeoo, orthotomoo;
    1. to cut straight:
    2. dropping the idea of cutting, to make straight and smooth 2 Tim 2:15<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    from Spiros Zodhiates
    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Orthotomeo, from orthos (3717) right and temno to cut or divide. To handle correctly, skillfully; to correctly teach the word of truth.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    In comparing this verse I am trying to determine which is the best reading. It seems from the meaning of spoudazo that the MV have it translated correctly. Either be diligent, or do your best. With diligence probably giving a better understanding of taking the time to do it right. The KJV uses Study here and I am not really sure now why. I am trying not to have an emotional attachment to Study. But this is how I have viewed this particular verse since I began studying the Bible. It seems from all evidence, including from the KJV itself, that the MV's have it translated more accurately.

    The second part of this verse is concerning Orthotomeo translated Rightly
    divide
    in the KJV and the NKJV. It seems from the evidence in the meanings I have provided that this is more accurate than to simply handle correctly yet this seems to be the desired translation of the MV's. Spiros Zodhiates uses both terms in his definition. The word seems to mean to divide.

    Please comment, I would like opinions. [​IMG]
    (good ones ;))

    [ February 03, 2002: Message edited by: Chet ]
     
  2. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    Chet, in my opinion, the answer concerning the word "study" is not just found in the Greek, but in English. The verb "study" carries with it the meaning "to endeavor or to try", and so does not always have the academic application that we more commonly place on it. That definition of "study" reconciles it with the Greek "spoudazo" and is probably the intent of the translators. If so, the translators were not inaccurate in translating it, but rather we have been inaccurate in interpreting it. I must confess being slovenly in this, assuming I knew what it meant and therefore never checking it closely. Thanks for calling attention to it.

    Rightly divide I believe is correct, "orthotomeo" possibly originating from Paul's tentmaking trade. Of course, it would not be taken literally as cutting something out, but rather in the sense of interpreting or understanding it correctly. A person who does a sloppy job cutting out will be ashamed when they try to put the pieces together. So be careful and diligent in the dividing.
     
  3. Chet

    Chet
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    Brother rlvaughn, Thank you for your reply! I had no clue about the English definition of
    Study, as you said, I thought of it only as academic. [​IMG]

    My next question then regarding rightly divide is why did all the other translators choose to translate this differently than what seems to be the meaning and intent of Paul?

    God Bless
     
  4. Ransom

    Ransom
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    Chet asked:

    My next question then regarding rightly divide is why did all the other translators choose to translate this differently than what seems to be the meaning and intent of Paul?

    I don't think they did. "Rightly divide" is a metaphor; the picture Paul is using is of someone cutting a straight line through a bolt of cloth. Clearly he is not talking about cutting up the Scriptures! Other versions are simply saying literally what Paul said figuratively.

    It's probably a good thing - 2 Tim. 2:15 has been abused by people such as Scofield, who read "rightly divide" and base an entire hermeneutic on finding the "right divisions" in Scripture . . . ironically, in doing so, they fail to "rightly divide."
     
  5. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    I think here the other translators are not terribly off base, though the KJV is more technically correct, in that they translate the metaphor as a metaphor, and the others are doing a little interpreting as well as translating. If we correctly interpret Paul's metaphor, we all come out at basically the same place in the end.
     
  6. Pastor Larry

    Pastor Larry
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    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rlvaughn:
    I think here the other translators are not terribly off base, though the KJV is more technically correct, in that they translate the metaphor as a metaphor, and the others are doing a little interpreting as well as translating. If we correctly interpret Paul's metaphor, we all come out at basically the same place in the end.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    More to the philosophical point of translating, translating a metaphor as a metaphor is only "technically correct" if the metaphor works in the receptor language. When it doesn't, then it is not technically correct; it is not correct at all. In this particular case, it is not a great problem since all agree that "rightly divide" is a metaphor for accurate interpretation. Such is not always the case though.
     

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