A Few of C.S. Lewis' Thoughts...

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by skypair, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. skypair

    skypair
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    ...that I thought worth considering from his book The Problem of Pain.

    1) "I disbelieve that doctrine [of Total Deparvity], partly on the logical ground that if our depravity were total we should not know ourselves to be depraved, and partly because experience shows us much goodness in human nature."

    2) (A "harpoon" at Luther) "Perhaps you have imagined that this humility is a pious illusion at which God smiles. That is a most dangerous error. It is theorretically dangerous, because if makes you identify a virture (i.e., a perfection) with an illusion (i.e., an imperfection), which must be nonsense. It is practically dangerous because it encourages man to mistake his first insights into his own corruption for the first beginnings of a halo round his own silly head."

    3) "The Fathers may sometimes say that we are punished for Adam's sin": but they much more often say we sinned 'in Adam.' It may be impossible to find what they meant by this, or we may decide that what they meant was erroneous. But I do not think we can dismiss their way of talking as a 'mere idiom.' Wisely, of foolishly, they believed that we were really --- and not simply by legal fiction --- involved in Adam's action.

    "I offer the following picture -- a 'myth' in the Socratic sense, a not unlikely tale.

    ...

    Then,in the fullness of time, God caused a descent upon this organism, both on its psychology and physiology, a new kind of consciousness of 'I' and 'me'... His organic processes obeyed the law of his own will, not the law of nature. His organs sent up appetites to the judgment seat of will not because they had to, but because he chose to. ... Since the processes of decay and repair in his tissues were similarly couscious and obedient, it is not fanciful to suppose that the length of his life was largely at his own discretion."


    Then Adam ate the apple and "Up to that moment the hman spirit had been in ful contro of the human organism. It doubtless expected that it would retain this control when it ceased to obey God. But its authority over the organism was a delegated authority which it lost when it ceased to be God's delegate. Having cut itself off, as far as it could, from the source of its being, if had cut itself off from its source of power. ... [God] began to rule the organism in a more external way, not by laws of the spirit, but by those of nature. ... And desires began to come up into the mind of man, not as his reason chose, but just as the biochemical and environmental facts happened to cause them. ... Thus human spirit from being the master of human nature became a mere lodger in its own house, or even a prisoner."

    skypair
     
    #1 skypair, Mar 7, 2008
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  2. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    I have only read Lewis' Screwtape Letters; and could not feel easy about the book at any stage.

    Now you have given us this,

    "I disbelieve that doctrine [of Total Deparvity], partly on the logical ground that if our depravity were total we should not know ourselves to be depraved, and partly because experience shows us much goodness in human nature."

    It clears it up at once. He wasn't the great thinker everybody has thought him to be! Just look at the flaws in his thinking in these few lines! It's usually such meager minds who think they are the mighty against the poor fools of Free Grace.

    I believe the doctrine of Total Deparvity, partly on the logical grounds of experience and the clearest possible statement of Holy Writ. Irony is we do not (naturally) believe our depravity is total because it is against our depraved nature to. We would never know ourselves to be depraved unless so taught by Him who is not of us, but of God. And what does experience show us, the reliability of the much goodness in human nature, or its deceptiveness? More than anything is the heart of man treacherous, I think Solomon - a wiser man than Lewis - has said.
     
    #2 Gerhard Ebersoehn, Mar 15, 2008
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  3. Gerhard Ebersoehn

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    CS Lewis' harpoon at himself! -- ""Perhaps you have imagined that this humility is a pious illusion at which God smiles. That is a most dangerous error. It is theorretically dangerous, because if makes you identify a virture (i.e., a perfection) with an illusion (i.e., an imperfection), which must be nonsense. It is practically dangerous because it encourages man to mistake his first insights into his own corruption for the first beginnings of a halo round his own silly head."

    GE
    Again, very well said of himself and all human nature -- of man's total depravity!
     
  4. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    CS Lewis: "Then,in the fullness of time, God caused a descent upon this organism, both on its psychology and physiology, a new kind of consciousness of 'I' and 'me'... His organic processes obeyed the law of his own will, not the law of nature. His organs sent up appetites to the judgment seat of will not because they had to, but because he chose to. ... Since the processes of decay and repair in his tissues were similarly couscious and obedient, it is not fanciful to suppose that the length of his life was largely at his own discretion.""

    GE
    What a wonderful evolutionistic improvement Adam's fall was! - That is, according to CS Lewis!
     
  5. Gerhard Ebersoehn

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    Was this where the ape became a man --- I have witnessed 'GREAT' 'Christian' thinkers argued for as much - 'Christian 'macro-physicists''.
     
    #5 Gerhard Ebersoehn, Mar 15, 2008
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  6. Gerhard Ebersoehn

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    Then Adam ate the apple and "Up to that moment the hman spirit had been in ful contro of the human organism. It doubtless expected that it would retain this control when it ceased to obey God. But its authority over the organism was a delegated authority which it lost when it ceased to be God's delegate. Having cut itself off, as far as it could, from the source of its being, if had cut itself off from its source of power. ... [God] began to rule the organism in a more external way, not by laws of the spirit, but by those of nature. ... And desires began to come up into the mind of man, not as his reason chose, but just as the biochemical and environmental facts happened to cause them. ... Thus human spirit from being the master of human nature became a mere lodger in its own house, or even a prisoner."

    GE
    The chronology of cause and effect are confused. It should be turned around directly, in order to understand the basics of Adam's fall - his 'eating of the apple'.
     

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