A question: Calling all educators!

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Havensdad, Dec 9, 2009.

  1. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok, I have a question.

    Do decimal points get recorded (typically: I know there might be some variation) in percentage grades?

    In other words, say you are at a school that counts a 94 and above as an "A," and a 89 to 93 a "B". If you get a 93.85, is this rounded up, rounded down, or does it retain the decimals? It seems like this would be in a kind of "limbo" since the scale states 93 and down/94 and up...
     
  2. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    I assume you mean at the class level. Generally, no. If, for example, the minimum requirement to get a B in a class is 80%, and your total grade so far is a 79.9%, your grade will be a C, not a B.

    OIW, the reality is, if 90 and above as an "A," then a B is actually 80 to 89.999...

    Now, if a teacher is being generous, that teacher might give a person an A instead of a B, but that's completely up to the teacher, and the teacher is certainly not required to do so.

    By no means is a student who gets an 89.5 entitled to an A.
     
  3. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is it permissible to ask the professor for extra credit work, to make up the hundredths of a point or is this looked down upon? I know he doesn't have to allow it: just wondering if it is permissible to ask?
     
  4. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    7,406
    Likes Received:
    99
    I use a points system in my classes. Out of a 1000 points for the semester 1000-930 is an A, 929-859 is a B, 858-788 is a C, and 787-717 is a D, anything below 679 and you have a very bad day.

    I you don't make the cut points wise from one letter grade to the next...you don't make the cut. I provide plenty of resources and review tools for the two tests I give and the other components all have a say in the final arrangement.

    You are awarded the grade you earn. Grace is a wonderful thing and is available at the Cross...but not equally shared in my classes. ;)
     
  5. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    Permissible to ask, certainly. Required that they give it, no.
     
  6. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2004
    Messages:
    7,406
    Likes Received:
    99
    It is permissibl, some professors are beneficent people. I am, however, not when it comes to students asking for extra extra credit.

    I make one extra credit assignment available and it is usually detailed in the syllabus. Extra credit is a hard get and might be worth it for some. I am of the mindset that a student earns their grades through consistent work. If I slant the playing field for one student and not the other students I am robbing the others of an opportunity. :)
     
  7. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    I should probably preface my input with the fact that I teach music, but the grading system is the same.
     
  8. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    LOL. My problem is not the tests, which I did well on, nor on the Book Critique, which I received a very high grade on: what has pushed me to the threshhold is a discussion board assignment. The assignment was to write a 1-2 page discussion board post, but single spaced. I have never written anything single spaced before (my default is set to double spaced, since this is seminary/turabian standard) and when I thought I set it to single spaced, I apparently set it to 1.5 space. So instead of having almost 1.5 pages, I had just under one page: for which I got docked substantially.

    It is actually very disappointing: I have never received anything but an A on my graduate writing assignments, and I have received two B's this go round; one in my New Testament class, because a poster got snippy with me (I never said a single wrong word to him), and the other because I am a knuckle head, and set my line spacing incorrectly.
     
  9. TomVols

    TomVols
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2000
    Messages:
    11,170
    Likes Received:
    0
    Both at the college, HS, and JR HIGH level, my scale was what it was, and the assignments were what they were. Extra credit is assumed that if it's done, you get the points. I've had people take initiative, do EC, and it would've lowered their score. I might give some benefit of the doubt if they displayed some practical and solid knowledge, but I tried to weave that into the course. I think it's unethical to give EC work to just one or two students trying to go from a B to an A (what about the D to C people?). I try to be fair throughout and thus you get all the opportunities you can.

    I always try to give a floating EC. For example, I taught HS algebra years ago. I would grant extra points if you could name five practical uses for Algebra in the real world. I gave them to the entire class at the beginning of the course, and anything they stuck them on, they got the points.
     
  10. Rubato 1

    Rubato 1
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    1,167
    Likes Received:
    0
    Round first, then determine the letter. It's only fair.

    I thought music teachers were supposed to use the chromatic grading scale, you know, A# to Fb ? If so, in the cas of an earned C flat, I would just give the student a B to avoid confusion :D
     
  11. Martin

    Martin
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    5,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    We don't turn in numbers, we turn in letters (A, B, C, D, F). In my personal gradebook any decimals get rounded up or down. This just makes my life a bit easier. Teaching 6 classes with 30 (or so) students in each class, I just don't have time to worry with decimals. Having said that, I don't give students anything. They get what they earn and, as I tell them, they need to be proud of their grade. After all, they earned it.
     
    #11 Martin, Dec 9, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 9, 2009
  12. Martin

    Martin
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    5,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    It never hurts to ask. After all, the worse thing they can do is say no. If they say no you have lost nothing. If they say yes, you have gained.

    I offer students two extra-credit options each semester. Our history department does various activities and field trips (etc) throughout the semester. Students who are actively involved in those activities can earn extra points. In my experience though, the students who get actively involved are not the students who need the extra points. Other than that I don't offer extra credit. If a student does not care enough to take the extra points I do offer then they must not want them that bad.
     
  13. Rhetorician

    Rhetorician
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    2,008
    Likes Received:
    2
    Extra Credit Answer

    Hello HD,

    I would say, after being in the classroom for 10 years, that if the prof gives "extra credit work," then s/he needs to make that offer to all not just to the one with the 89.99 average.

    Thoughts?

    "That is all!"
     
  14. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nope. 89.59% is not 90.00%. If 90% is the minimum needed for an A, then 89.99999% is a B.

    If a teacher wants to be generous and do so, great. But it's certainly not required, and students are not entitled to it. It's not unfair at all if a teacher does not round up.
     
  15. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have to say in all honesty, that the grades (at least at my institution) are not listed this way. The listing is 89-93= B, 94-100= A. 93 is the maximum for a B, in the same way that 94 is a minimum for an A. Rounding certainly seems to be in order; otherwise, this is left up to the whim of the educator (likes you? A. Doesn't like you? B).
     
  16. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not at all. If it's 89 or greater, but less than 94, then it's a B. If it's 94 or higher, it's an A. Therefore, if it's 93.9, it's still a B. That's likewise fair, and it's also more accurate.

    Of course, if you as an educator wish to round to the nearest full grade (a 93.4 would be a B, and a 93.5 would be an A) then that's in your privilege to do so and it's perfectly acceptible. But it's by no means any more or less fair than not rounding.
     
  17. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    But that not how the rule is written. It says nothing about "94 and above." It just says 89-93 B, 94-100 A.


    I would agree with you, if it said "94 and above, A, 94 and below, B." But that is not what the rules state.

    Whatever the accepted practice, I think that your statement is nonetheless wrong, at least under the rules at my institution. The rules 93 and below, 94 and above, definitely leave a gap. Rounding seems to be the only fair solution, at least under the rules as written.

    But this, of course, was not the point of the thread: the point was to find out the standard practice. Now, I realize there IS no standard practice. Some educators say rounding is not required, some say it is unfair NOT to round...
     
  18. Johnv

    Johnv
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    21,321
    Likes Received:
    0
    The way the rule is written, whether the educator rounds or not is fair, so long as the educator applies it to everyone in the class consistently. So, yes, imo, it would be permissible and fair to round to the nearest integer for all students.
     
  19. Paul33

    Paul33
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2004
    Messages:
    2,434
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is just common sense that the grading scale that you have presented is understood to mean 94 = A, 93.9 = B.

    That is why students ask me if they can do extra credit to raise a 93.9 to a 94. They know that anything less than a 94 is a B.

    I think you are being too concrete. 86-93 is a B, and that includes the decimal point right up to 94, then it is an A.

    Why does it matter so much? If you usually receive A's, why does one B matter? Certainly you are not basing your self-esteem or worth on a grade in a class, are you?
     
  20. Havensdad

    Havensdad
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,382
    Likes Received:
    0
    No. But when you are applying for a degree program, a 3.8 or 3.9 does not look as good as a perfect 4.0 (which I had, until this class).
     

Share This Page

Loading...