African Lion Kisses & Hugs Woman who saved him

Discussion in '2008 Archive' started by LadyEagle, Jan 12, 2007.

  1. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
    Expand Collapse
    <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    22,028
    Likes Received:
    1
  2. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Messages:
    15,125
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow thats amazing!
     
  3. Petra-O IX

    Petra-O IX
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aw, Gee. That is heart warming.
    Enjoyed this , thanks for the post LE.
     
  4. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
    Expand Collapse
    <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    22,028
    Likes Received:
    1
    You're welcome. :flower:
     
  5. Predestined

    Predestined
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    That is awesome......thanks for sharing.
     
  6. Martin

    Martin
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2005
    Messages:
    5,228
    Likes Received:
    0
    These kind of things show us that animals are not as stupid as some people think they are. The dog I currently have, I rescued from a bad though (in theory) not a "physically" abusive situation. I say "in theory" because he was really under weight and would run if you picked up a golf club or something like that (so 1+1=2, if you know what I mean). He was afraid of everything, the first dog I knew that was literally afraid of the dark! Now he is at a healthy weight, he is loving, friendly, protective, and very out-going. His only remaining fear is thunder and fireworks. Animals know when you have helped them out, they do remember. This is why people who abuse dogs often get bit by dogs. It is also why animal lovers, like the late great Steve Irwin, get along well with animals that others have trouble with. The animals pick up on the person's "energy" (so to speak). They normally know when a person means them harm and when a person is friendly.

    I think these type events also help refute the lie of evolution. God created this universe, God created this world, and all the creatures of the earth were created by God. Call me silly, but I have a hard time believing that God created a world full of living things that are dumb. No, God's creatures are not dumb. They may not think like humans but, rest assured, they do think. This lion, in his own way, knows that this lady has helped him out. He has bonded with that lady. While we all need to remember, and respect the fact, that the lion is still a wild animal it does show us that animals are not dumb robots.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. annsni

    annsni
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Messages:
    20,162
    Likes Received:
    368
    Martin - It sounds like we had similar dogs! Sandy was also formerly abused and some people adopted her from the pound the day before she was to be put down. She was so skinny and SO scared - I would see her on the way to the bus stop and I'd bring biscuits - it took me a month for her to finally take one from me. On the 4th of July weekend, she came to my house (we were friendly by this time) and JUMPED on the back door whining so I let her in. She sat in my lap (she was a medium sized dog - balanced out at 55 lbs. at full weight) and shook the entire night. The next day, I went to her house (I knew where she came from) and no one was home but they had left the back porch door open with a big bowl of food and water - turns out they went away for the weekend, leaving the dog to her own devices. When they finally came home (she now had been sleeping IN my bed for 3 days), I went over to return her and said that I'd love to take her if they don't want her. They said they adopted her because they felt badly for her and she was too young to put down (about 18 months) but they couldn't keep her since they worked full time. So we got her.

    That dog was MY faithful companion for 17 years. I had her in the car once and was attacked through the window by some man I just had a bit of an altercation with in the supermarket and she literally tore off part of this guys forearm as he punched me in the face (I was in the driver's seat and Sandy was in the passenger seat). The police later caught him at the hospital where he needed surgery to repair his arm. Sandy had NEVER bitten anyone before or showed signs of hostility - other than 'play' protecting me when my brother's would pretend to hit me (we laughed when she'd hop in my lap and growl - while wagging her tail). She was my protector, my friend and a constant companion through many peaks and valleys in my life. I'll always miss my dear mutt.

    BTW - My name is Ann but everyone calls me Annie ...... and Sandy was the name that the pound had given her!! It was providence, I say. LOL!!

    That is amazing about that lion!! He knows - he loves her. How sweet is that??
     
  8. JFox1

    JFox1
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2005
    Messages:
    737
    Likes Received:
    0
    That was wonderful! Animals are a lot smarter than they're given credit for! :thumbsup:
     
  9. Ps104_33

    Ps104_33
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2001
    Messages:
    4,005
    Likes Received:
    0
    I doubt that that woman would ever get inside that cage with that lion. Wild animals are very unpredictable. Alot of these emotions that we attribute to animals are nothing but anthropomorphic illusions.
     
  10. pinoybaptist

    pinoybaptist
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    8,123
    Likes Received:
    1
    I wouldn't make such a sweeping statement of all animals.
    There's this dog over in North Carolina for example who was adopted as a puppy by a fireman who had the habit of going out into the woods to walk on some days, and would take the puppy with him until the puppy grew up to be a robust German shepherd. By that time there was a second dog.
    One day the older dog just wouldn't walk ahead of his owner, and kept stopping and whining as if urging the man to come home.
    The owner finally gave up and turned back and went home thinking there was something wrong with the dog and intending to take him to the vet.
    Soon as he walked into the door he dropped to the floor.
    He was having a stroke and a heart attack. Couldn't move.
    He was slipping away, and the younger dog kept him awake by constantly licking his face, while the older dog got the cordless phone and put it by him and he painfully dialed 911 and mumbled for help and gave his name and address to the operator.
    Turns out his dogs knew the rhythm of his heartbeats, since they grew up sleeping on his chest with their ears close to his heart, and that morning the dogs knew something was wrong with his heart.

    Or, how about the pig whose owner collapsed in her kitchen, and the pig went running in and out of the bolt door to the street and back to her owner but no one was paying attention to her because she was just a pig and it was a common sight for her to be seen by the road and so she lay down in the middle of the road at the approach of another vehicle which was a neighbor. Now, a neighbor's pig layin' down lookin' dead in the middle of a narrow country road ain't somethin' ya'll kin jis' pass by, so the neighbor got out of the jeep, and as he got to the pig, she shoots up and looks up at him, grunts, grunts, and walks to the house, and this neighbor has just enough horse sense in him to follow her, see his neighbor layin' there, and call for 911.

    There are special animals.

    But you're right in one aspect: it'll be foolhardy to go into that cage. That's a wild animal there, not a dog.
     
    #10 pinoybaptist, Jan 14, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 14, 2007
  11. Purple Lady

    Purple Lady
    Expand Collapse
    <img src=/PurpleLady2.jpg>

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2001
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    0
    Being a cat-lover, I really loved this, too! :love2:
     
  12. SouthernBelle

    SouthernBelle
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am a HUGE animal lover, so when I first saw this I thought it was beautiful. Then I saw an interview with Jack Hanna, whom I have known my whole life, saying that the nature of the Lion itself that they can be unpredictable and should not be allowed to do such a thing. No matter how much the Lion appreciates the rescue the danger is still there. He used Sigfried and Roy for an example.
    (This is from a man who dedicates his whole life to animals. My mother worked for him in the early 60's in his vet office in Knoxville. They have stayed in touch all these years. He almost always has hissing cockroaches in his pocket and once tried to get his wife to nurse a baby chimp he was raising as an infant.
    It's beautiful but use common sense.):wavey:
     
  13. Diggin in da Word

    Diggin in da Word
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2006
    Messages:
    1,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    The lion is probably tasting her for the kill later.
     
  14. Alcott

    Alcott
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2002
    Messages:
    7,455
    Likes Received:
    93
    This is a nice story and clip, but I have to agree with other posters who stress that wild animals are still wild and unpredictable, and it's a mistake to show too much trust and let them 'bond' too closely.

    With domestic animals it is quite different. I had a dog who 'came to me' as a stray because I had caught this smaller female a few days earlier. I liked this bigger dog, which looked like a collie/German shepherd cross, and I noticed he was bony (his ribs showed), his eyes usually had corruption, and he went around with his head down most of the time. The smaller female soon disappeared, but the bigger mix stayed around. I played with him, took him for long walks in the field, and his eye corruption cleared up and became more playful and energetic, as well as eating better; and pretty soon he wanted to be around me all the time; even jumping fences (he injured himself on a chainlink) to not be separated. Then on July 4th he was in the garage when firecrackers began to go off somewhere close and he tried to bash his way through the door to get inside the house, tearing up the screen door. But he also could be very threatening and aggressive to strangers who came around, and that's how he left. A man who ran a mower shop came by to pick up a mower my dad was going to sell, and the dog managed to break the rope which restrained him in the front of the garage and went after that man, who had a heart condition. My dad did manage to restrain him again before he really tore into that man, but it happend we knew another man who had seen this dog and thought he could 'use' him. So he took the dog and, though I never saw him again, that man kept him for about 5 years. As I understand, the dog did it again to a stranger at the end-- he went after a man coming to fill the butane tank and trapped that serviceman on top of the tank; and the owner had the dog, which was probably 8-10 years old by then, put to sleep.

    Perhaps a too-long story to develop the point: if a domestic animal, though loyal, is still dangerous, at least to strangers, then a wild animal (sometimes dangerous to their own kind) certainly will be dangerous, even to those it's familiar with.
     
    #14 Alcott, Jan 16, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 16, 2007
  15. UnchartedSpirit

    UnchartedSpirit
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,176
    Likes Received:
    0
    careful, wild cats are known to love humans TOO much! I remember this story about a lepoard raised by this lady who couldn't be returned to the wild, but anybody who looked or fealt like her owner this lepoard would play with and would hug them, but wouldn't let them leave her cage, unless prodded with treats or other toys for hours afterwards. Wildcats that are raised by humans tend to be that way apparently. Sure you can hug them, but some may not let go...
     
  16. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
    Expand Collapse
    <b>Moderator</b> <img src =/israel.gif>
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2002
    Messages:
    22,028
    Likes Received:
    1
    Yikes!!!! :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...