Aieeeee!!!

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by npetreley, Jul 25, 2007.

  1. npetreley

    npetreley
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    Messages:
    7,359
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've seen it argued here that "eternal" must mean "1,000 years" because the etymology of aionios shows it can mean "an age".

    The full etymology of aionios, however, takes you back to the word "aie" as the first root, doesn't it? And "aie" means "ever". Doesn't that bring us back to "forever" or "everlasting" or "eternal"?


    :laugh:
     
  2. npetreley

    npetreley
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2002
    Messages:
    7,359
    Likes Received:
    0
    I interpret the silence on this as conceding the point. Since the full etymology of aionios is aie, and aie means ever, then even if you take the KS approach of using etymology to define a term, the translators did get it correct by translating these words as "forever", "eternal" and "everlasting".
     
  3. James_Newman

    James_Newman
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Messages:
    5,013
    Likes Received:
    0
    I guess that depends on how ever long ever is. If you ever find out, I'd be interested in hearing it. Personally as a KJV man, I never had a problem with the words 'forever', 'eternal' and 'everlasting'. Even in English they mean the same thing.
     

Share This Page

Loading...