America's Ugly Exported "Gospel"

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by nunatak, May 27, 2008.

  1. nunatak

    nunatak
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  2. Tom Butler

    Tom Butler
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    So much for "can't we all get along?".

    Bravo!
     
  3. Brother Bob

    Brother Bob
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    removed by poster
     
    #3 Brother Bob, May 27, 2008
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  4. JustChristian

    JustChristian
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    A powerful message. The example about the daughter dying in the car accident reminded me of the story behind the hymn "It is Well with my Soul."

    In 1873, he had planned to travel to Europe with his family on the S.S. Ville Du Havre, but sent the family ahead while he was delayed on business. While crossing the Atlantic, the ship sank rapidly after a collision with another ship, and all four of Spafford's daughters died. His wife Anna survived and sent him the now famous telegram, "Saved alone." Shortly afterwards, as Spafford traveled to meet his grieving wife, he was inspired to write these words as his ship passed near where his daughters had died.

    It Is Well With My Soul

    When peace like a river, attendeth my way,
    When sorrows like sea billows roll;
    Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to say,
    It is well, it is well, with my soul.

    Refrain:
    It is well, with my soul,
    It is well, with my soul,
    It is well, it is well, with my soul.

    Though Satan should buffet, though trials should come,
    Let this blest assurance control,
    That Christ has regarded my helpless estate,
    And hath shed His own blood for my soul.

    My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
    My sin, not in part but the whole,
    Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
    Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul!

    And Lord, haste the day when my faith shall be sight,
    The clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
    The trump shall resound, and the Lord shall descend,
    Even so, it is well with my soul.

    Horatio Spafford

    My belief is that this perspective on tragedy truly reflects the Sovereignty, power, and all-sufficiency of our Lord. This is one of my favorite hymns because it really speaks to me.

    The Spaffords later had three more children, one of whom (a son) died in infancy. In 1881 the Spaffords, including baby Bertha and newborn Grace, set sail for Palestine. The Spaffords moved to Jeru­sa­lem and helped found a group called the Amer­i­can Col­o­ny; its mis­sion was to serve the poor. Bertha Spafford Vester spent her entire adult life concentrating on relief and charitable work in Jerusalem.
     
    #4 JustChristian, May 27, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: May 27, 2008
  5. Allan

    Allan
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    He sounds like me on this :)

    I obviously agree with him, but I might have put in the OP "Prosperity gospel" instead of just "gospel". In any case - thanks for the link :godisgood:
     
  6. TomMann

    TomMann
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    My next door neighbor was sitting on his front porch the other morning reading and enjoying the weather. He shared what he was reading and offered to let me read it when he was finished. I told him just give me the name and author and I'd look it up online.

    http://www.shilohonline.org/articles/spring/mos_complete.htm

    I would recommend a complete, contemplative reading for those who have the time. And for those who don't have the time..... I would hope that a few paragraphs in you might be persuaded to make the time. It is not in my mind a quick read. I find myself not overwhelmed, but in awe. Here is a quick quote on Prosperity.... this comes from chapter four, the third paragraph.....

    It is altogether too favorable an opinion of human nature to suppose that men are apt to grow better under the smiles of prosperity. History teaches nothing more emphatically than that unmingled prosperity is one of the chief sources of national and individual degeneracy. “Pride and fullness of bread” embolden wickedness, inflate insolence, become the aliment of angry dissension, collisions of interest, and pervading corruption.

    As you may discern from the language of the read... he is not a current author. Gardiner Spring lived from 1775 to 1873.
     

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