an actual 1769 KJV

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Logos1560, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    In this thread, some verses from a KJV edition that was printed at Cambridge in 1769 will be presented. Hopefully, these will help it be determined whether our present KJV editions are the 1769 edition.

    Psalm 18:47 It is God that avengeth me, and fubdueth the people unto me.

    Psalm 32:5 I acknowldged my fin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I faid, I will confefs my tranfgreffions unto the LORD; and thou forgaveft the iniquity of my fin.

    Psalm 36:3 The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit; he hath left off to be wife, and to do good.

    Psalm 42:1 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, fo panteth my foul after thee, O God

    Psalm 60:4 Thou haft given a banner to them that feared thee, that it may be difplayed becaufe of the truth, Selah.

    Psalm 78:66 And he fmote his enemies in the hinder part; he put them to a perpetual reproach.

    Psalm 107:16 For he hath broken the gates of brafs, and cut the gates of iron in funder.
     
  2. Logos1560

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    Some may think that I did not type those verses correctly, but be assured that I attempted to type them exactly as they look in the 1769 Cambridge KJV edition that I have.

    One important fact to note is that the 1762 Cambridge edition of the KJV, the 1769 Cambridge edition of the KJV, the 1769 Oxford edition of the KJV, and later Oxford KJV editions printed in 1795, 1799, 1804, and even as late as 1810 still have a character shaped like "f" for long "s" in many words.
     
  3. Ed Edwards

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    In 1766 the 13 American colonies declared themselves independent of Great Britain and their crown. Part of the protest was over the burdensome Bible Tax. Yep, the King (or Queen) of England got money for ever Bible sold. In 1762 the Oxford Edition (KJV1762) came out - Bible tax. In 1769 the Cambridge Edition came out - Bible tax. What brave soul will up and print their own AMERICAN patriotic Bible Edition? Strangely, that information is hard to find. I'm still looking for it.

    Unfortunately in the mid 1910s England was at war with Germany and started trying to convince the USofA that the Americans and England was, and always had been, good buds. So England started a propaganda jig: convince the USofA that they were friends of England. I think there was an Anglo-American plot against Germany that included suppressing the information: In 1776-1883 it was TREASON in the USofA to sell a King's Bible. We in the USofA have no King but Jesus and will not bow to any other king, especially an English King.
     
  4. Logos1560

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    According to the sources I have seen, the first edition of the KJV published in America was by Robert Aitkin (1734-1802) in 1782. He had printed a New Testament in 1777. This 1782 edition also still used a character that looks similar to a "f" for a long "s" in many words [examples--houfe, fon, wifdom, fimple, perfons]. It does not seem to have been based on the 1769 Oxford KJV edition. Perhaps he did not have a copy of it.

    About this edition, Paul Gutjahr observed: “Because of the need to use paper sparingly, margins are almost nonexistent in his volume, and the usual marginal notes of the King James Version are absent” (American Bible, p. 21).
     
  5. Deacon

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    Authorized Version 1732 (Baskett)
    Authorized Version 1769
    Authorized Version 1873

    Psalm 18:47 It is God that avengeth me, and fubdueth the people under me.
    Psalm 18:47 It is God that avengeth me, and fubdueth the people unto me.
    Psalm 18:47 It is God that avengeth me, And subdueth the people under me.


    Psalm 32:5 I acknowldged my fin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid : I faid, I will confefs my tranfgreffions unto the LORD; and thou forgaveft the iniquity of my
    fin. Selah.
    Psalm 32:5 I acknowldged my fin unto thee, and mine iniquity have I not hid. I faid, I will confefs my tranfgreffions unto the LORD; and thou forgaveft the iniquity of my
    fin.
    Psalm 32:5 I acknowledged my sin unto thee, And mine iniquity have I not hid. I said, I will confess my transgressions unto the Lord; And thou forgavest the iniquity of my
    sin. Selah.


    Psalm 36:3 The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit : he hath left off to be wife, and to do good.
    Psalm 36:3 The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit; he hath left off to be wife, and to do good
    Psalm 36:3 The words of his mouth are iniquity and deceit: He hath left off to be wise, and to do good.


    Psalm 42:1 As the hart panteth after the water-brooks, fo panteth my foul after thee, O God.
    Psalm 42:1 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, fo panteth my foul after thee, O God
    Psalm 42:1 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, So panteth my soul after thee, O God.


    Psalm 60:4 Thou haft given a banner to them that fear thee : that it may be difplayed becaufe of the truth. Selah.
    Psalm 60:4 Thou haft given a banner to them that feared thee, that it may be difplayed becaufe of the truth, Selah.
    Psalm 60:4 Thou hast given a banner to them that fear thee, That it may be displayed because of the truth. Selah.


    Psalm 78:66 And he fmote his enemies in the hinder parts : he put them to a perpetual reproach.
    Psalm 78:66 And he fmote his enemies in the hinder part; he put them to a perpetual reproach.
    Psalm 78:66 And he smote his enemies in the hinder parts: He put them to a perpetual reproach.


    Psalm 107:16 For he hath broken the gates of brafs, and cut the gates of iron in funder.
    Psalm 107:16 For he hath broken the gates of brafs, and cut the gates of iron in funder.
    Psalm 107:16 For he hath broken the gates of brass, And cut the bars of iron in sunder.

     
    #5 Deacon, Jan 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2009
  6. Samuel Owen

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    My 1769 edition reads exactly like this, except for spelling corrections, and one word corrected WIFE=WISE.
    But otherwise it is the same, so what is the point.

    If one egg is brown, and the other is white, does that make the egg different.
     
  7. Ed Edwards

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    Amen, Brother Samuel Owen -- Preach it :thumbs:


    Psalm 42:1 (Geneva Bible 1599):
    As the harte brayeth for the riuers of water, so panteth my soule after thee, O God.

    Psalm 42:1 (KJV1611 Edition, e-sword.com edition):
    As the Hart panteth after the water brookes, so panteth my soule after thee, O God.

    Psalm 42:1 (KJV1769ish, quoted in OP):
    As the hart panteth after the water brooks, fo panteth my foul after thee, O God

    Psalm 42:1 (KJV1769ish, crosswalk.com edition):
    As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.

    Psalm 42:1 (KJV1769ish, Pure Cambridge Bible /PCE/

    http://www.bibleprotector.com/KJB-PCE.pdf

    As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.

    Psalm 42:1 (KJV
    [FONT=Arial, Geneva, Helvetica]As a deer longs for streams of water, so I long for You, God. [/FONT]

    Psalm 42:1 (HCSB = Christian Standard Bible /Holman, 2003/
    As a deer longs for streams of water,[FONT=Arial, Geneva, Helvetica]so I long for You, God. [/FONT]

    The white 'hart' and the brown 'deer',
    the white 'longs for' and the brown 'panteth'.

    'panteth' is not in my dictionary 'longs for' is
     
  8. EdSutton

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    "Once again - [Sigh!]!! 'Thefs are not -- :BangHead:

    mif-fpellings, at all. [Bang head, again! "Ouch!"]

    Thefe are ivst the attempt of the pofter -- [Third time, Bang head against brick wall! "Double 'Ouch!'"]

    to reprodvce the ftyle of the lettering of that time. :BangHead: (A picture is still worth a thousand words!)

    The problem(s) you seem to keep hauing (having) here, are therefore thefe:

    (#1.)
    that the compvters the majority of vs have access to, inclvding me, do not haue the capacity to reprodvce the long "s", and an "f" is the clofeft (closest) character we can employ for this pvrpose, although I generally use a different font, namely one of these : ("f"), or ("f") for that character.

    (#2.) there was no difference made between "i" and "j", hence "Iesus" or sometimes "Iesvs" (Jesus), "Iofhua" (Joshua), and "ivst" (just) for three examples.

    (#3. ) The "v" and "u" symbols were generally reuerfed (reversed), from what we vse (use) today,

    although this was already somewhat underway, at that time.
    Have you ever wondered why we

    identify the letter "W" as "Double you" and not as "Double Vee"?

    The reafon (reason) we do so, is that in the early Modern Englifh era, the character "v" was pronounced as "you", and generally carried that sound, the sound of "uh" and also "ooH", although this was not absolute, by the 17th and 18th centuries.
    The "u" usually carried the sound of "vee" or sometimes "ye", again, as well as the 'long' "u", as in "use" (use) while the "v" character expressed the 'short" "u", hence "vp" (up). although this was not absolute, and in fact, at times they were vsed (used) interchangeably, and by the middle of the 18th century, one can likely find examples of this in the same sentence. :BangHead:

    But these are not misspellings, at all. There are certainly plenty of typos in the 1611 early editions of the KJV. However, most of these were soon corrected, and the difference you observe in spelling today were consistent with spelling, at that time, such as "sonne" (1611) for "son" 2009), But neither are incorrect, spellings, although were one to spell "son" for the star the earth orbits around, that is incorrect, for that giant 'blazing' orb is the "sun" (2009), or "sunne" (1611), never the "son"!

    The only reason I can think of that I keep on :BangHead: ("Ouch!") must be because it feels so good when I stop!!'"

    Signed,

    Language Cop
     
    #8 EdSutton, Jan 11, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2009
  9. Ed Edwards

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    Old but Good news:

    Mt. Sinai takes a Break:

    Exodus 19:18 (KLJV1611 Edition):
    And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the Lord descended vpon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly.
     
  10. Samuel Owen

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    Well we have to give credit, where credit is due. Look how the English spelled the River Timms, Thames, now that does not spell Timms to me?.

    So in 1611, they liked to spell in puzzles, but later corrections do not make the translation any different. In fact my 1769 could still use some, there are still many funny words in it.

    As far as typos, who knows? somewhere around 1700 or so, a version was printed that was so full of type set corruptions, they had to destroy hundreds of copies.

    I like this one better :tonofbricks: = :)
     
  11. Logos1560

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    Do you have the 1732 KJV edition you cited and do you have a copy of an actual 1769 Oxford edition of the KJV? Do you know of any place where the text of an actual 1769 Oxford edition of the KJV is posted online? Do you know of anywhere a printed copy of it can be examined or obtained?

    I know that there are copies of the 1769 Oxford edition of the KJV at the American Bible Society library in New York City and at one of the public libraries in New York City. One may be also at an university library in Texas. When you search for a copy of it online that is supposed to be found at libraries in the United States, usually the much later editions of the KJV are listed as though they were a 1769 edition.
     
  12. Logos1560

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    More verses from a KJV edition printed at Cambridge in 1769.

    Deut. 24:17 Thou fhalt not pervert the judgement of the ftranger, nor of the fatherlefs, nor take the widow's raiment to pledge

    Judges 11:7 And Jephthah faid unto the children of Gilead, Did not ye hate me, and expel me out of my father's houfe? and why are ye come unto me now when ye are in diftrefs?

    Judges 19:29 And when he was come into his houfe, he took a knife, and laid hold on his concubine, and divided her, together with her bones, into twelve pieces, and fent her into all the coaft of Ifrael.

    1 Samuel 2:13 And the prieft's cuftom with the people was, that, when any man offered facrifice, the prieft's fervant came, while the flefh was in feething, with a flefhhook of three teeth in his hand.
     
  13. NaasPreacher (C4K)

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    I have to agree. I don't know why there is such an issue over the now defunct long 's'
     
  14. Deacon

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    I picked up a 1732 Baskett OT on Ebay a while back ($50 + shipping).
    It needs to be rebound but I have the original boards and the pages are tight and in very good condition.
    I have no idea where you'd find a 1769 edition.

    Rob
     

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