An Unthinkable Disease, with NO Cure?

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by righteousdude2, Jun 8, 2013.

  1. righteousdude2

    righteousdude2
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    I am a diabetic. I was diagnosed with diabetes in 1995....

    Because I had worked as a Vocational Rehab Counselor for three years, and knew all too well about the large number of complications this disease brings to the afflicted diabetic [*neuropathy, blindness, heart disease, kidney failure, strokes, heart attacks, neuropathy of the digestive system and skin] my first inclination was to say to my doctor that "I'd rather you told me I had cancer!"

    Now that may seem extreme to many of you, but in my mind, cancer, in most cases, had cures. Diabetes had no cure, and it always brought along with it complications that eventually and over time, will run the body into the ground. You see; it isn't the diabetes that kills you, because with regular exercise, a controlled diet, and if needed, medication, diabetes can be controlled. It is failing to do what is needed, for most, it means a complete change in habits regarding diet, exercise, and continued checking of your sugar levels.

    Over the years, I have kept my diabetes under good control. In fact, my A1c's is usually under 5.9. It's the complications that I feared when the diagnosis came, and it is the complications that keep me racked in pain.

    For this reason, I wanted to share this link on diabetes with all of you, and remind you to be aware of the symptoms and get treatment if needed. The truth is diabetes is rising in numbers around the world, so, don't be like me, and think I'd never get that disease. The truth is, even though there is no diabetes in my family, anyone can develop diabetes, and the sooner you treat it, the less chance you have of serious complications. I put off the inevitable for more than three years. I knew the symptoms, but lived in denial. And now, with three years of time wasted [by not treating it sooner], I have serious complications to pay for for my denial.

    I posted this to make others aware.

    Check out the link, and be Diabetes Smart [in other words don't ignore the early symptoms]!

    http://www.thediabetessite.com/clickToGive/dbs/home

    If any of you have diabetes, it would be great to hear from you, and what you are doing to "hold the line" and how you trust in, and look to God in helping you to live with the disease.

    *Those in "italics" are the complications I suffer with.
     
  2. Earth Wind and Fire

    Earth Wind and Fire
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    Genetic predispositions. In my family its diabetes, heart attacks, and pancreas cancer. Right now ive gotten two out of three so I am awaiting the 3rd to take me home...and note, there is no cure for that cancer.
     
  3. HankD

    HankD
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    May our Father bless you both, touch your bodies and restore your health.

    HankD
     
  4. Ed B

    Ed B
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    I was diagnosed with T2 around 2005. I had an A1C of close to 10 at diagnosis. In the subsequent years my A1Cs have been in a range from 5.7 to as high as 6.7 with an average of about 6.2. My father, his brothers and his mother were also T2. My younger brother is considered pre-diabetic. My father and his brothers were skinny T2's which some people say shouldn't exist in nature. I see some genetic predisposition involved here too.


    But as my father told me when I was diagnosed, "You can die from diabetes or you can die with diabetes". Recognizing it and being active with our own treatment is very important. In my case being diagnosed T2 made me address lifestyle choices especially in relation to starchy carbs and processed sugars. It was like a slap in the face with a wet mop. In many ways I am more healthy today than I was five and perhaps even ten years prior to diagnosis. For me, the thought of blindness is a huge motivator. But the neuropathy is no fun.


    As you inferred and my doctor agrees, the side effects do not always play fair. Neuropathy in particular doesn't seem to care how good someone controls their BG levels. Once you have diabetic neuropathy it seems to advance at its own pace even if we keep BG levels at or near normal levels.
     

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