Any Difference between Propiation/Expatiation?

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by JesusFan, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. JesusFan

    JesusFan
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    As it regards the Cross and the atonement?
    Seen both words used in different version for same verses!
     
  2. Jerry Shugart

    Jerry Shugart
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    Hi JesusFan,

    The word "propitiation" is translated from the Greek word hilasmos, and one of the meanings of that word is "the means of appeasing" (Thayer's Greek English Lexicon).

    In the following translation we see the Greek word translated to match that meaning:

    "He is the atoning sacrifice (hilasmos) for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world" (1 Jn.2:2; NIV).

    In the Septuaigint (LXX), the Greek version of the Old Testament, hilasmos appears at Numbers 5:8 in the expression "ram of the atonement."

    Of course a "ram of the atonement" is not the same thing as an "expiation."
     
  3. JesusFan

    JesusFan
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    First place read about this was when CH Dodd headed up translation NEB and used that term, as he was very uncomfortable in having Jesus described as being a substutionary/propiationary sacrifice for our sins, so chose "water it down!"
     
  4. Skandelon

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    expiation: [ < Latin expiare, < ex- ('out' - here used as an intensifier) + piare (to atone) < pius (devout)] to compensate, repay, make amends for, make up for.


    propitiation [ < Latin propitius (favorable, auspicious), < pro- (forward) + -pitius, (to eagerly volunteer or give of oneself) -- lit., rushing forward (to the altar or throne) to please the angry god or ruler ]. To appease, pacify, placate, assuage, or mollify. Propitiation is sometimes used to translate Greek hilaskesthai.
     
  5. JesusFan

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    Would it be correct to say that propitiation would be stronger word in regards to stating the substutionary aspects of death of Christ?
     
  6. mandym

    mandym
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    Expatiation?

    Did you mean Expiation?
     
  7. JesusFan

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    yes, and thanks!
     
  8. glfredrick

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    Yes...

    Common word useage sees propitiation as a substitution and expiation as a covering.
     
  9. JesusFan

    JesusFan
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    So if a translator held to death of Christ being penal substitution, would go for prop, but IF holding to moral influence or some other view, opt for ex?
     
  10. glfredrick

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    Most likely, even though the Greek is clear -- propitiation.

    Expiation is akin to God "covering over" Adam and Eve with the skins of slain lambs when they discovered that they were naked in the garden.

    Propitiation is Jesus substituting His perfect righteousness for our sin nature.

    Would you prefer to keep your sin nature and simply be covered over by the blood or would you prefer to be created a new creature in a supernatural act?

    I'm sure that some cannot answer that question correctly...
     

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