anyone know anything about the GARB/Cedarville thing?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by lizzybee, Apr 25, 2004.

  1. lizzybee

    lizzybee
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just heard about it at church tonight and have no idea what's the big deal--something about the Southern Baptists in Ohio are saying it's ok for their students to go to Cedarville and so the GARB nationwide is about to split over it

    I apoligize for not having more info--I was just wondering if anyone heard anything about it or your thoughts?

    We only go to a GARB church now cause the Independent Baptist church in our town is an embarrassement to the cause of Christ--shames me to say it because I was reared IFB and would still go to one. SO anyway I'm not really GARB and don't understand the whole thing

    Anyone?

    Malissa
     
  2. RandR

    RandR
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    I believe I recall Cedarville affiliating with the Onio Southern Baptist Convention a year or two ago.

    Maybe that doesn't sit well with some GARBers. Why on earth the national body would split over with whom Cedarville associates I can't say.
     
  3. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2000
    Messages:
    29,402
    Likes Received:
    12
    For most of its existence, the GARBC has "endorsed" certain schools and mission agencies as APPROVED.

    A few years ago there was a groundswell against a very new evangelical school (Grand Rapids, now Cornerstone) and a movement to have the fellowship of churches withdraw approval.

    Rather than fight and split the group, it was decided to STOP THE PRACTICE of "approval" or endorsement. Let each church or each fellowship or each state do what they see fit.

    Cedarville (one of the GARBC previously-approved schools) has broadened its appeal outside traditional ifb ranks. SBC of Ohio recognized it, as did SBC seminaries - seeing young men and women go there to school and get a first-rate education.

    So the SBC-Ohio gave ITS approval/endorsement, encouraging students to attend. This is a very common practice, but rare that SBC endorse something outside the SBC ranks!

    I think it speaks well of Cedarville, but now there is a movement to bad-mouth Cedarville because of its new endorsement! It is NOT an SBC school, NOT supported by the SBC. Just recognized as a good school!

    Hope it does not lead to a split.
     
  4. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,074
    Likes Received:
    102
    My understanding is that the SBC in Ohio was seriously considering starting its own school and decided not to because Cedarville was what it was looking for all along.

    I also understand the final decision over GARBC's relationship to Cedarville won't be settled until the annual conference this summer.
     
  5. Chuck

    Chuck
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
  6. RandR

    RandR
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2003
    Messages:
    348
    Likes Received:
    0
    If NOT supported by the SBC is how one defines a school as SBC, then the only "SBC schools" are the seminaries.

    Historically, a college has been considered Southern Baptist when it is supported by the Southern Baptist state convention in that state.
     
  7. Chuck

    Chuck
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here's another page I found relating more specifically to Cedarville's relationship with the GARBC. I think the GARBC dealt with the issue by no longer "officially" endorsing any of the colleges that it used to partner with. There's no problem with individuals or churches still recommending these colleges, but GARBC's website doesn't mention them any more.

    http://www.cedarville.edu/dept/er/garbc/
     
  8. Rosell

    Rosell
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2004
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    0
    It has always been my understanding that the SBC doesn't own, operate or support four year undergraduate colleges or universities. Various state conventions, which are independent and autonomous bodies only voluntarily affiliated with the SBC, have different levels of operating colleges and universities. Technically speaking, there are no "Southern Baptist" colleges or universities. For example, Baylor University in Texas would not be a "Southern Baptist" school, but would be a "Texas Baptist" school. Semantics perhaps, but that is my understanding of how they operate.

    There have been some changes in that level of relationship in recent years. The SBC national body does operate six seminaries. Southeastern, under the leadership of Paige Patterson, has instituted an undergraduate program in Biblical studies and he plans to do the same at Southwestern. In the past, the SBC has declined to do this, but Patterson sort of took the lead in doing it at Southeastern because the enrollment dropped off during the leadership transition and the SBC bases its financial support of the school on dollars per student. The Bachelor's level program and the allowance that wives of students could take one seminary course for free per semester got the numbers up. I suspect the motivation is the same at Southwestern, where enrollment has dropped by about 2,000 students since its peak back in the late 80's.

    There are several other schools in various state conventions that are "endorsed" or "recommended" like Cedarville is in Ohio, but which are not actually financially supported by a state convention. I'm not sure if Criswell College in Dallas has been "recommended" or is actually financially supported by the SBCT (the smaller, newer fundamentalist Baptist state convention in Texas).

    Some changes in the affiliation status of several Baptist colleges supported by state conventions have occurred in the past decade, mainly as a result of liability issues. When the Baptist Foundation in Arizona went bankrupt, Grand Canyon University, which was owned by the state convention, severed its ties when it discovered that the legalities in its relationship to the convention meant that its assets, including campus and endowment, could be tapped to pay back the foundation's default. It still has a fraternal relationship with the convention, and is still considered a Baptist university, with all trustees required to be born again Christians and 80 percent members of ASBC affiliated churches, but the direct control no longer exists. Several other schools are following this pattern as a result.
     
  9. Siegfried

    Siegfried
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2000
    Messages:
    689
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where does Boyce College (a school of SBTS) fit into that grid? Is it supported by the SBC as Southeastern College is?
     
  10. rsr

    rsr
    Expand Collapse
    <b> 7,000 posts club</b>
    Administrator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    10,074
    Likes Received:
    102
    Rosell said:

    Your are correct.

    However, the changing affiliations between the state conventions and the schools is not simply based on fear of liability; several schools, such as Baylor, have moved to become independent because of the friction within the state and conventions.

    Boyce College, as part of the seminary, is operated by the SBC.
     
  11. Greg Linscott

    Greg Linscott
    Expand Collapse
    <img src =/7963.jpg>

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Messages:
    521
    Likes Received:
    0
  12. swaimj

    swaimj
    Expand Collapse
    <img src=/swaimj.gif>

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2000
    Messages:
    3,426
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for linking the article, Greg. Very interesting.
     

Share This Page

Loading...