Are a majority Of Fundamentalist Baptist KJVO Then?

Discussion in 'Fundamental Baptist Forum' started by JesusFan, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. JesusFan

    JesusFan
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    Would IBF/Fundamentalists be seen as considering KJV as being THE Bible to use?

    seems that the Independent Baptist churches I have visited with friends were KJVO!
     
  2. Phillip

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    I have seen about as many, if not more IFB's that allow and often use modern versions and a few are KJV Preferred which will usually use the NKJV too since it was written from the TR mansucripts. (With footnotes).

    The KJVO's that are strong seem to be coming from an area through Arkansas, Oklahoma Tenn. etc. It seems that the ones I visit talk about the same hero's that cleaned up and straightened up their IFB churches and they have a little Bible college (that is not state registered) in Arkansas where a lot of this is preached. As these school send out young pastors they are trained to work at a church a few years, then start their own church sponsored by the church they worked at. So, these all seem to have a common thread. I will not name any names here, because it is a very tight group.

    Most of the MV IFB's are truly more 'Independent'.
     
  3. MichaelBuckingham

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    Here in the UK conservative Baptists tend to be KJV preferred, very few people make a point of being KJVO.
     
  4. seekingthetruth

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    The majority of my IFB church uses the KJV, but noone is called down for using NIV, NKJV, ect.

    We don't have a rule that demands it's use exclusively.

    As a matter of fact, my pastor raised his eyebrows because of my KJV Scofield Bible, only because he has a real problem with Scofield promoting the "Gap Theory", but he didnt tell me not to use it.

    John
     
  5. Phillip

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    That is interesting because I just bought my 6 year old grandson a nice Bible that he is really proud of. The church he goes to is KJVO so naturally I had to get a KJV and the only nice ones I found in the Lifeway store I visited were Scofield's. I bought that for him and the preacher hasn't said a thing. It is sad though because he can quote John 3:16 from the KJV, but he cannot tell me what each sentence means when he quotes it. He is only getting the words. His mother is into this church too so in order not to cause problems (She requested I do not read him Modern Versions until he is 18). I did not pull out a modern Bible I stuck to what he knew and tried my best to explain it to him. It would be so much easier to take a simple Modern Version and have him read it, but, since his parents are relatively new in church and were very worldly I do not want to alienate them.

    They get spastic when I bring up something their pastor says. It is really like a cult.
     
  6. seekingthetruth

    seekingthetruth
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    Unfortunately, your experience with IFB is all too often true. i hope that what I am about to say helps you.

    The IFB church that I attend is almosy identical to the SBC church I grew up in. SBC has changed. In my opinion, the SBC overall has become very liberal. Not every church in the SBC is liberal, many are still biblically solid, but many have comprimised too many fundamentals.

    And the IFB gets a bad name because one of the largest IFB churches is First Baptist in Hammond, ID, and their school which is Hyles Anderson University. First Baptist was an American Baptist ( I believe) before Jack Hyles took it over. Hyles was a tyrant. He had an unreal list of man-made rules that he claimed were godly. A person had to obey all of the rules just to prove to the church elders that they were indeed saved.

    Unfortunately, they have graduated many, many pastors from this university, and the legalism of Jack Hyles runs rampant. If you find a good solid IFB church, chances are that the pastor is not a Hyles camp preacher. There are some good IFB schools like Pensacola and Temple and you would see a vast difference in the graduates from there.

    My church is nowhere near a Hyles type church. Mosy people use the KJV but it is not required. Most of the women wear dresses, but it is not required. Our pastor is one of us. He doesn't put himself on a higher pedestal and talk down to us. We can go to him anytime and question anything he says without reprecussion

    In fact, the IFB church i go to now is almost identical to the SBC church I grew up in, (before the SBC became liberal)

    I hope this helps. I know that my experience doesn't explain everyone elses experience, but i wanted you to know that all IFB churches are not bad. Though I do admit that way too many are.

    JOhn

    BTW, alot of IFB preachers do agree with Scofield's Gap theory, my pastor does not. Don't tell him i said this, but I think the gap theory is highly possible because it does expalin alot of mysteries.
     
    #6 seekingthetruth, Nov 10, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 10, 2011
  7. Phillip

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    Thanks for your description. I had noticed the pastor brought up the name "Hyles" several times as a great leader.

    I came from SBC so my background is almost 100% SBC all the way through the libral/conservative wars of the 80's. I do know that the SBC churches in this area were always conservative and used a lot of legalism, but it wasn't forced down your throat, nor were you lectured every single time the pastor stands up on how hard he is working and how the church members are failing him by not following all of the legalistic rules such as having a set of drums anywhere within a mile of the church. This is my first exposure to IFB and I understand that it is one of the more conservative from a group that started to the East of us in Arkansas and Tenn. areas. The pastor not only bad mouths the SBC's for all being liberal, but he also says his church is the only decent one in town (Apparently there is another IFB. He turned his back on the Missionary Baptists several years ago.)

    They have a little Bible college in Arkansas that is NOT registered as a state school. The reason is that they can't preach against homosexuality if they do. I think the REAL reason is that the founders all got their own diplomas and PHd's from the school they started themselves.

    I wouldn't call our local SBC's very liberal. They do use more contemporary music, but the music has changed since I was a little kid in the late 60's and early 70's. I remember when "Set My Soul Afire Lord" was sang at youth camp and preachers grumbled that it was modern secular sounding therefore was not to be played in church. I think every generation goes through this routine.

    My problem is that I am not learning anything during Bible study or church because the subject is always the same, First, The King James Bible is the perfect Bible because it is the seventh revision and seven is God's perfect number (no joke he preaches this from the pulpit), then we go on through all the other legalistic issues such as tattoos and smoking, etc. I have yet to hear a positive sermon that wasn't primarily jumping on the members for not following what the KJB says. I am moving back to a SBC as soon as I find the one I feel comfortable with. I feel that almost every SBC in the area is still conservative enough since this area is considered part of the Bible belt.
     
  8. Don

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    You're close; the actual reason for this (and many other similar schools, in many denominations) is because they can't meet the educational requiremetns to be a state school. But the founders of the school use an excuse like "homosexuality," and preach that to their students, who are like most people and just take them at face value, and never research what it actually takes to be an accredited school.
     
  9. dcorbett

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    State accreditation is not an accurate measure of academic proficiency. State accreditation simply means that the government has reviewed the curriculum and faculty of a school and given its stamp of approval. Christian schools do not seek or want this type of approval because we don't believe it represents the standard - academically or spiritually - that we want for our children.

    Considering that public schools are, by and large, failing academically, and that the standardized test scores for children in private schools are considerably higher than their public school counterparts, we don't feel we need the states' review of our curriculum to validate it academically. Additionally, Christian schools have at the core of their purpose to teach the children within the framework of biblical principles. For a school's curriculum to be approved of by the government, it would be required to include teaching on evolution, "alternative lifestyles", and other anti-biblical philosophies and practices.

    quote from Paul Chappell "The Value of a Christian Education"
     
  10. Salty

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    I would hate to think what is was like for a pastor to preach out of the sixth revision of the KJV! :smilewinkgrin:

    D - I don't agree with you!
    Here in Syracuse with have one (main) Christian School. Faith Heritage - they are accredited by the Association of Christian [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Schools International(ACSI) and Middle States. Association of Colleges and Schools.[/FONT]

    [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]I can assure you they do not teach "alternative lifestyles", and other anti-biblical philosophies and practices. [/FONT]

    [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Also for the Record -accreditation by The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is not a government action.





    [/FONT]
     
    #10 Salty, Nov 14, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2011
  11. dcorbett

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    [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]Did you read the whole message? You would've seen this if you had:[/FONT]

    [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]quote from Paul Chappell "The Value of a Christian Education" [/FONT]

    A question for you - what denomination backs Faith Heritage? And don't forget, our church is IFB, so we don't subscribe to Associations when all the want it your dues and nothing else.
    [FONT=Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]





    [/FONT][/QUOTE]
     
    #11 dcorbett, Nov 15, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2011
  12. Phillip

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    I think you are pushing it a little. At least now, I don't know of any states that "require" the teaching of evolution, "Alternative lifestyles or any other antibiblical philosophies. If it is a private school, to get a state stamp of approval you simply have to meet certain minimum requirements; many of which are related to the education of your teachers. This school is using teachers that were taught at the school by people who were taught by other uneducated people who started the school.

    Yes, many lower grade-schools are selecting non-biblical textbooks to teach, but I am unaware of private colleges being prevented from teaching the "religion" they present to the public as their foundation as long as it does not advocate violence or overthrow of the government. At least not in the states through the Bible belt in which we and Arkansas are still considered.
     
  13. Phillip

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    [/QUOTE]
    Having grown up in SBC churches I can assure you the SBC does not tell a church it has to pay a certain percentage for dues. The amount is selected by the church and it is used to train, take care of and support missionaries in an effecient way that is difficult since the IFB church we attend requires the missionaries to drive around in beat up cars and spend half of their lives begging churches for money each year rather than spending the time preaching the gospel. Our church pays each missionary it supports $50 a month and after two years if they are not self supporting it is considered they have failed in building up a local church regardless of the country they are from. I would rather have support from a Commission knowing I have insurance, emergency transportation, some level of protection and continuous support without worrying about spending half my year begging for money.

    If you will read Paul's epistle's you will find out that a form of Convention was used in supporting missionaries during certain times. The IFB church I attend is also a member of a Commission named another name, but it does the exact same thing and pools money for missionaries. The word Commission will not be found on it; it is usually changed to "Association"; but, there are also certain percentages required to remain members in a few of these Associations.
     

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