Are drums any different than guns?

Discussion in 'Music Ministry' started by Don, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. Don

    Don
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    I know this was a topic here a year or two, or maybe more ago. Why is music with drums wrong?

    Is it the drums that are wrong? Or they way they're used? Or is it something else?
     
  2. Deacon

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    Personally I don’t see a connection between gun and drums
    but bagpipes on the other hand are classified an instrument of war.


    Let's see if I can cover all the major points against drums:

    • Drums have a tribal beat and we are the family of God, not a tribe
    • They mimic the beat of the heart and our heart is desperately wicked.
    • Drums have to be struck and we’re told not to be strikers
    • Drums are a perCUSSion instrument and we’re told not to cuss
    Rob
     
  3. Crabtownboy

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    The drum is neither good and bad in itself ... it all depends on what you do with it. Use it to praise God and it is good.
     
  4. Jim1999

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    The sound of drums in a church setting drive me bonkers. Otherwise they are ok.

    One small church I was in had little space for a set of drums, so they put them and the drummer in the empty baptistry! I was simple amazed when he started to drum as I started the pastoral prayer. I had to remind him that I already had God's attention and didn't need the drums.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  5. Jon-Marc

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    I wouldn't say drums are wrong; I just don't like them. Most drummers pound on those things so hard that it's often louder than the rest of the instruments. My favorite instruments are the guitar and piano because I can easily sing with either, but you can't sing to drums alone. I can tolerate them if they're played softly and don't drown out the real musical instruments. I don't consider drums a musical instrument--just a noise maker.

    By the way, what have drums got to do with guns? You can't shoot someone with a drum, although the noise might deafen them.
     
    #5 Jon-Marc, Jun 22, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 22, 2010
  6. Jerome

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  7. Don

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    We don't, as a general rule, preach against guns, because we know it's how we use the guns; they're tools used to implement the intent of the heart.

    Same with drums (in my be-it-ever-so-humble opinion).
     
  8. Don

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    This I can understand.

    BTW: If your church has a drumset, I offer you a challenge. Take away their drumsticks and replace them with brushes. If your drummer can't accomplish the same thing with a different set of tools, then ask him to examine his spirit.
     
  9. Johnathon E

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    I have played the drums for thirty years now, studied them in school - even taught them and do play them in my small church. No, there is nothing wrong with them and they can be played correctly in a church setting though I rarely find it is done so.

    Just like any other instrument the important thing is to play with the choir and other musicians not over them. I use a pair of "hot rods" - thin wooden dowels strapped together that provide a soft sound comparable to brushes but with a control similar to sticks. I also have my drums muffled and do not beat them to death. My goal is to support the piano and organ, not to overpower it.

    As to not being able to sing with drums - I must disagree. My wife and I do a version of "On Time God" with just her singing and me playing softly on the drums that is quite lovely. I have heard many others do similar performances as well. Granted the singer has to be able to sing A Capella since they will not have tonal help from the drums.

    Much like an electric guitar that is turned up too high or a piano player who thinks he is Jerry Lee Lewis the problem most often is in the hands of the performer - not the instrument.
     
  10. Thinkingstuff

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    Its because they, for some reason, are equated with "jungle music" or "pagan music". And we all know that the Devil created 4/4 time for music. It insites our baser nature with ungodly gyrations and before you know it well be dancing around Asherah poles and visiting temple prostitutes. How could you not know? BTW sarcasm.
     
  11. Johnathon E

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    4/4...no. Now 5/4 time is truly evil!:laugh:
     
  12. Jon-Marc

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    As a church song leader, I found that a lot of fun to lead. :BangHead: Also, songs with 3/4 time for the stanza and 4/4 time for the chorus are fun to lead too. :tonofbricks: Then there are the songs where the time keeps changing all through the song. They will drive a song leader nuts. :eek:
     
  13. nodak

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    Keep the decibel level down and drums can add a lot.

    Of course, I'm one of those legalist type that finds a few beats (three are coming to my mind right now) inappropriate for Christian worship.

    One is distinctly part of worship in one native American group, one part of another native American worship, and one is very much a take it off take it all off bar beat.

    There are some others that are a problem for me personally, as they are associated in my mind and my bro's of honky tonks.

    Bear in mind that I might clean the kitchen to music with those beats and enjoy it. Just not conducive to worship for me personally.

    When I worship, I WANT to leave the day to day habits of the world behind.
     
  14. DaleMcNamee

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    Hi All!

    I've read everyone's comments and I agree with what's been written.

    I understand where Jim1999 and Jon-Marc are coming from.

    I've been playing conga drums and other hand drums in church for over 30 years and I always aim to be sensitive and tasteful in my playing as to avoid the situations mentioned.

    My drums are not miked and have switched to djembe because nobody in the congregation could hear me with the vocalists and guitarist being miked. We also have a set drummer who plays a small jazz kit (he's also not miked). The vocalists all sing powerfully and operatically ( they are voice majors ).

    As for the miscue that Jim experienced...My music director began playing the recessional hymn on the organ when the pastor had paused in a closing prayer... So,drummers aren't the only culprits. :smilewinkgrin

    Hi to Jonathon ! :wavey: It's good to see a fellow drummer here ! :thumbs:

    That's my humble opinion, and That's All Folks !
     
  15. jaigner

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    6/8, however, is the Lord's time signature.
     
  16. Alcott

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    Drums and guns? Just use guns instead of drums. I guess a .38 would work for a snare, but you probably need a 12-gauge for a kettledrum. It doesn't really matter what you use in the concussion section.
     
  17. Don

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    Since 6/8 is just another way of writing 3/4, does that mean 3/4 is also the Lord's time signature? :)
     
  18. menageriekeeper

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    But Alcott, my church doesn't like the damage I do to the ceiling when I play my guns in church. Go figure!

    :laugh:
     
  19. Jon-Marc

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    I don't see all that much difference between 6/8 and 6/4 time. I like waltz music very much, and so I like 3/4--it's easy to lead and sing.. I also like 4/4, and it's also easy to lead and sing. There's also 12/8 and 9/8; I'm not crazy about those.

    I've always wondered how song writers decide what time signature to use, and whether to give the 8th, 4th, or half note one beat. I've also noticed how uneducated many song writers these days are with the atrocious grammar they use--especially the excessive use of "ain't", double and even triple negatives in songs.
     
  20. jaigner

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    No, mathematically they are equal, musically, they are not.

    Plus I don't like 3/4 as much.
     

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