As much as I hate to say this

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Don, May 19, 2011.

  1. Don

    Don
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2000
    Messages:
    10,549
    Likes Received:
    212
    I predict Obama will be re-elected.

    Not that I'll vote for him; but because there's no strong opposition candidate, and no strong support behind any of the current opposition candidates. The conservative talk show hosts are pretty much each touting different candidates to oppose Obama; and a couple of the conservative talk show hosts I listen to (not O'Reilly or Limbaugh) are supporting candidates that aren't even making it into the headlines.

    And frankly, the Republican hopefuls who are making it into the news spotlights...aren't "liked" by the majority of the people who voted for Obama.

    Trump had a better chance of getting elected than any of the current Republican potentials; but that was on sheer name recognition and television popularity, not because he had any actual potential to be a good president.

    I'm pretty pessimistic about this next election.
     
  2. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,131
    Likes Received:
    221
    not yet !!
     
  3. mandym

    mandym
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Messages:
    4,991
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is far to early to be making predictions.
     
  4. carpro

    carpro
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    20,941
    Likes Received:
    296
    The odds are always with the incumbent, but Obama ranks with Carter in sheer ineptitude.

    OTOH He's a much better at lying about his record and making it sound good.
     
  5. glfredrick

    glfredrick
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Right now, almost anything you read or watch on the national media will show the Republicans in a state of disarray with no forthcoming candidate. Additionally, the press is already working to help Republicans with their candidate choice by presenting hit pieces on the candidates they most fear and puff pieces on the ones they would most like to see run against THEIR candidate -- Obama.

    This time around, I believe the people will not be swayed by the media as much as they have in prior election cycles. The Tea Party influence is and will be a major factor -- as evidenced by the efforts to silence them -- and they are not going away. I have also noticed that the TP is driving the Republican candidates to speak with conservative authority. That alone will energize the base more than most pundits even think possible.

    Don't fear... A candidate will arise, the people will get behind him (or her!) and an election will be fought -- and prayerfully, won. Happens every time.
     
  6. revmwc

    revmwc
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,037
    Likes Received:
    69
    Here is our man:

    This will hopefully be the candidate and hopefully next President of this nation.

    Herman Cain.

    http://www.hermancain.com/index.asp

    He is a pro-life candidate

    http://www.lifenews.com/2011/03/15/h...z-attacks-him/

    If the news can spread about him and he can win the nomination he can win. The life news article starts this way: "During a presentation before a set of conservative bloggers in the nation’s capital today, likely Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain, a pro-life businessman, bashed the Planned Parenthood abortion business — which went after him in return."
     
  7. billwald

    billwald
    Expand Collapse
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2000
    Messages:
    11,414
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not if Republicans can continue to trash the economy and send jobs off shore. And the Republicans know it!
     
  8. mandym

    mandym
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2011
    Messages:
    4,991
    Likes Received:
    0

    To say such a thing a lot of facts have to be ignored.
     
  9. StefanM

    StefanM
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6,430
    Likes Received:
    72
    He definitely has a solid background. I'm not sure how realistic his chances are, as he is outside the political establishment. I'd definitely like to hear more from him. I love the fact that he wasn't born into privilege. It sounds like he has a real understanding of individuals in difficult economic circumstances combined with the business savvy needed to tackle the pressing issues of our time.

    But, as much as I hate to bring it up, I could see the GOP being accused of tokenism by nominating an African-American. (As if it would be inconceivable that an African-American man would be a conservative Republican!) It would be patently unfair and incredibly misinformed, but with the nature of politics these days, it seems like everything turns into a racial issue. I could see him being painted as an "Uncle Tom." It's sad that this is even a factor, but it's there.
     
  10. glfredrick

    glfredrick
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    We should bear in mind -- and ALWAYS remind the liberal Democrats -- that the Republicans were the ones who fought for (and won!) the human rights and segregation battles. From slavery to the civil rights campaign of the 1960s, Republicans have led the charge even though there is always hostility from the left, including active Congressmen who were KKK members.

    The Democrats have co-opted the platform of diversity, but conservatives were there first, by a long shot! The Democrats have also co-opted the "rich Republican" meme, though these days, most of the big money is Democrat-controlled -- from Hollyweird to Wall Street, liberals run the money. Just start naming big money names and see who they support. While there are always some wealthy Republicans in the mix, the number of wealthy Democrats with their control, influence, and socialistic tendencies are more prevalent than Republicans these days.
     
  11. revmwc

    revmwc
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,037
    Likes Received:
    69
    Economy started decline 2007 right after hmm let's see oh yes the Democrats took over the house and senate rget then started setting the budget and things that drive the economy. Let me think a minute 2007 now 2011 economy still in decline, Dem's were in charge of it for 4 years with 2 of those having a DEM president, economy still in the toilet and the deficite has increased 3 to 4 times what it was. No offshore oil drilling which is right off our coast and many folks lost jobs when that happend, the economy continues in the toilet as the REP controlled house tries to cut spending and keep everyones taxes low, the DEM's want to increase cost for EVERYONE and increase spending even more. Perfect platform for a REP victory in 2012.
     
  12. HankD

    HankD
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2001
    Messages:
    15,165
    Likes Received:
    322
    Even with a strong Republican candidate opposing him he will probably win.

    He is charismatic with a silver tongue, super smart, shrewd and cunning.

    He has BIG BUCKS at his disposal.

    He has the best of minds to help him wordsmith and craft his messages.

    He has the press behind him and against the "right" to smear and denigrate them.

    Gas will magically drop next year.

    Unemployment as well.

    Etc. etc...

    Then there is the October (or sooner) surprise(s).

    And probably more...

    HankD
     
    #12 HankD, May 19, 2011
    Last edited: May 19, 2011
  13. Don

    Don
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2000
    Messages:
    10,549
    Likes Received:
    212
    Those were all points I hadn't thought of yet. My pessimism grows deeper....

    BUT...the day after I start this thread, he goes and makes the Israel announcement. Not sure what to think....
     
  14. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,131
    Likes Received:
    221
    First of all, I hope he does not refer to himself as "African-Americian" - whatever that means.

    I want an AMERICAN to be my President.!

    "In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag... We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language... and we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."
    Theodore Roosevelt

    We can have no 50-50 allegiance in this country. Either a man is an American and nothing else, or he is not an American at all.
    - Theodore Roosevelt
     
    #14 Salty, May 19, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2011
  15. StefanM

    StefanM
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6,430
    Likes Received:
    72
    It's not a matter of allegiance but of origin. It is more accurate than the term "Black," anyway. No humans are black in color. Everyone is a shade of brown.
     
  16. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,131
    Likes Received:
    221
    Actually the accurate term is mulatto.

    Let me ask you this - is a Caucasian from the Union of South Africa to be considered an African-American

    and when does a person from Africa become an A-A, when he steps off the plane, gets his green card, gets a drivers license or is naturalized.

    How about this - an American of African decent

    So why don't we use the term European-American as often as we use the term A-A?

    As for me and my household - I am proud to be an American - period!
     
  17. StefanM

    StefanM
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6,430
    Likes Received:
    72
    I'm not sure about the mulatto term. That typically refers to a mixed-race individual. I recognize that all of us are mixed to one extent or another, but the term is usually used in a more restrictive sense.

    African-American generally refers to a person born (or raised) within the US whose ethnic origin is from people groups based in Africa.

    I don't think it's the best term, but it is a generally inoffensive term for those to whom it refers. I actually had a friend in high school who was born in South Africa and immigrated to the US as a young child. Her ethnic background was Afrikaner, but I often thought that she should try to apply for scholarships as an African-American just as a joke. She could not get scholarships for "black" students, but she would technically be an "African-American."

    My thoughts on the European-American term is that it is typically not used because individuals of European descent have typically been the majority in the United States. Furthermore, it's not a matter of unified ethnicity. Africans brought to the US in slavery had their cultural and social bonds destroyed, and the American slave experience led to a new culture as Africans from different people groups tended to develop common bonds with each other and against white slaveholders. Racism didn't help matters either. Instead of viewing slavery as essentially an economic problem, it became an issue of racial supremacy for slaveholders, which further justified the concept of slavery in the minds of slaveholders and sympathizers.

    For "whites" in urban environments, the idea of a "European American" was not even on their radar. Certain ethnic groups were considered inferior. The Irish, for instance, are very "white" in general, but they were not considered socially and culturally equal to more "prestigious" groups, such as the English and French. Italians often had the same experience. As a general rule, the longer the ethnicity had been present in the US, the more prestige it acquired. Later immigrant groups tended to be marginalized and denigrated.

    The idea of "whiteness," however, is inseparable from the racism against people of African origin. The English might think the Irish were dirty and useless, but neither the English nor the Irish would place any stock in Africans. In the American South, this worked out with poor whites in much the same fashion. The wealthy slaveholders had no use for the poor whites, but the poor whites could feel better about themselves by viewing African slaves as being inferior, despite the fact that the poor whites were only slightly better off economically in many cases. The slaveholders could endorse this sentiment as well, as it reinforced their worldview that allowed them to persist in slaveholding.
     
  18. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,131
    Likes Received:
    221
    I was referring specifically referring to Obama as being a mulatto. In fact, it appears he has disregarded one half of his heritage.


    In some areas of the country European-Americans are now a minority - and soon all European-Americans will be a minority - nation-wide. At that point will all races be equal and referred to by their decent?

    Let me repeat what Teddy told us: We can have no 50-50 allegiance in this country. Either a man is an American and nothing else, or he is not an American at all.
    - Theodore Roosevelt
     
  19. StefanM

    StefanM
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    Messages:
    6,430
    Likes Received:
    72
    I was referring to Herman Cain, not Obama, when I used the term African-American.

    Regarding the Teddy Roosevelt quote, it is not a matter of allegiance. It is a matter of ethnic origin. One can be mindful of one's own heritage without having a split allegiance.

    Furthermore, one could take the quote from a different angle and reject it altogether. What about one's allegiance to God? Does this not supersede allegiance to country?
     
  20. Aaron

    Aaron
    Expand Collapse
    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2000
    Messages:
    15,680
    Likes Received:
    241
    Polly wanna cracker?
     

Share This Page

Loading...