Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discussion in 'All Other Discussions' started by kyredneck, May 15, 2012.

  1. kyredneck

    kyredneck
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  2. kyredneck

    kyredneck
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    #2 kyredneck, May 16, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2012
  3. Melanie

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    Wow!!!

    I don't know if the orientation of the satelite was right as New Zealand/Aoteroa is the view that is best:thumbsup::tongue3:
     
  4. faithgirl46

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    Awesome . I saw this on tv last night & it was sooo cool
     
  5. Jon-Marc

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    I never cease to be amazed at all that God has created (and perhaps still creates?). I once read about a star that is 1,000,000 miles in diameter; that would be more than 3,000,000 miles around it! Only God knows what wonders He's created out there in deep space just for His own pleasure that we will probably never see. I believe space to be endless, and that makes an endless canvas on which God can create His masterpieces.
     
  6. kyredneck

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    Yea, I think this is some of the most awesome video I've ever seen; I can imagine if I were on the ISS I'd stay glued to the window and wouldn't get anything done!
     
  7. Tom Butler

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    "Awesome" may not be adequate to describe the videos.
     
  8. saturneptune

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    Thank you for posting that video. Astronomy is one of my hobbies, and that is where I get my name here. I love looking at the planets through a scope. It magnifies God's Creation. Believe it or not, in the six years I have been here, five times I have been asked in a PM if I am into astrology because of my name.

    Again, thanks for the video. It is beyond any words that come to mind.
     
  9. billwald

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    Interesting. The light flashes at the beginning are lightening strikes?
     
  10. Winman

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    Yes, those are lightning storms viewed from above. My daughter showed me this video about 2 months ago on her computer, but I did not know where to find it, thanks for the link.

    When I was young I was big into astronomy, and one of my friends became a professional astronomer. I still have a nice 5" scope, this makes me want to dig it out and use it again.

    Thanks for the great video.
     
  11. kyredneck

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    From the first link:

    Explanation: Many wonders are visible when flying over the Earth at night. A compilation of such visual spectacles was captured recently from the International Space Station (ISS) and set to rousing music. Passing below are white clouds, orange city lights, lightning flashes in thunderstorms, and dark blue seas. On the horizon is the golden haze of Earth's thin atmosphere, frequently decorated by dancing auroras as the video progresses. The green parts of auroras typically remain below the space station, but the station flies right through the red and purple auroral peaks. Solar panels of the ISS are seen around the frame edges. The ominous wave of approaching brightness at the end of each sequence is just the dawn of the sunlit half of Earth, a dawn that occurs every 90 minutes.

    From the second link:

    " The video, taken by astronauts and edited by Michael König, was from a high-resolution camera with low-light abilities, so it can see faint sources of light. The footage was all taken from August to October 2011.....The cities streaming by underneath; the instantly recognizable outlines of familiar places like the Great Lakes or the boot of Italy; the incredible flickering thunderstorms — giving you an understanding that there are always thousands of such storms all over the planet at any one time; the incredible 3D view of the green and red aurorae which you can actually see as towering structures dozens or even hundreds kilometers in height; the stars rising and setting and spinning over the horizon; the reflection of the Moon on the Earth below following along our point of view at 2:50 into the footage; or the thin glowing arc above the horizon: airglow, caused by molecules in the upper atmosphere slowly emitting light as they release energy accumulated during the day.

    It’s all fantastic.

    There have been plenty of beautiful time lapse videos of the Earth from the ISS — most notably, one from September — but this sets a new standard. Not the least of which because it’s so smooth; the sense of motion, the sense of flying, is overpowering. But the sheer magnificence of the entire video is simply incredible.
     

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