At 400 years, theological distinctions define, divide Baptists

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by gb93433, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. gb93433

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    Jun 26, 2003
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    The entire story is at

    ARLINGTON, Texas (ABP) -- Some of the same theological disputes that divided Baptists throughout their first 400 years continue to distinguish different branches of the Baptist family tree in the early years of the 21st century, theologian James Leo Garrett told a recent conference.

    And other challenges -- ranging from the popularity of dispensationalist interpretations of the Bible's apocalyptic passages to a fuzzy understanding of the Trinity -- likely will confront Baptists in the near future, he predicted.

    “It is of paramount importance in the 21st century that Baptists think theologically as Baptists and in reference to the Baptist heritage,” he insisted.
    Garrett, distinguished professor of theology emeritus at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, and author of Baptist Theology: A Four-Century Study, addressed the B.H. Carroll Theological Institute summer colloquy in Arlington, Texas.

    In the 17th and 18th centuries, theological questions regarding salvation -- specifically election and free will -- differentiated distinct brands of Baptists, Garrett asserted. Calvinist Particular Baptists stressed God’s sovereign role in the salvation of the elect, and Arminian General Baptists emphasized the ability of humans to respond freely to God’s grace.
  2. Freedom

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    May 18, 2009
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    One of the most cherished Baptist doctrines, Priesthood of the Believer, almost ensures that when there are major differences in doctrine, such as Calvinism vs, free will, there will be major partitions in the denomination. The denomination can either chose to accept both officially, which the SBC has not, or they can split. Also, an overemphasis on politics vs. evangelism, will be derisive. Many Southern Baptists would rather evangelize than fight for the Republican party.

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