Attention oil painters

Discussion in 'Hobby/Travel Forum' started by Gina B, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Gina B

    Gina B
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    I need technique help!
    I'm doing a painting that has words across the middle. Here's the problem.
    Well, maybe I should explain what I did so far. I painted the canvas with a thin layer of black, then in the middle of the black lengthwise I added a ting of green, yellow, and blue and swept it over the black, resulting in a glow of yellow and blue tinged green through the middle of the canvas, barely there.
    Now, here's the problem. I need to paint a word in red across that center. I have to do it while the canvas is still wet so that the bit of yellow, blue, and green mix and create a hint of other color. That still would be fine, except I want the words to appear as if they are granite like. Not in color, but a grainy look to them. I'd normally dry brush to get that, but I can't on this or I lose the benefit of the other colors peeking through.
    Right now I'm debating on whether it would be a good idea to let this dry completely, dry brush the letters, and then use a rag soaked in paint thinner over the whole middle section.

    Also, I'm not sure if I'll do this or not, but I may be bold and attempt to create a reflection of the word under it. I wouldn't know where to even start with that. LOL Any ideas?

    Gina
     
  2. Pathwalker

    Pathwalker
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    I would let the painting dry completely and then I would dry brush the letters. I would use a horsehair paintbrush for the lettering. This is just my opinion. I hope this helps.
     
  3. Thankful

    Thankful
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    You can let the background dry, then paint the letters to get the look that you want, then let the letters dry. After the letters dry, use the color mix to glaze over the letters. Use a very thin mix of the color so that the letters will show through. (Actually a very little color in your painting medium.) This takes awhile because of the drying time.

    The great thing about letting each stage dry is if you don't like the application, you can just wipe it off without destroying the background or the letters. This way you can paint the refection also.

    There are some painting mediums that you can use to speed the drying time.

    Have fun!
     
  4. Gina B

    Gina B
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    Thank you. [​IMG]
    I've been using turpentine and linseed. I'm realizing lately how dangerous they are though. I knew turpentine was but had no clue about linseed. Wow.
    Gina
     
  5. Thankful

    Thankful
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    I use tupernoid (not turpenoid natural) for a brush cleaner, but some people will not use it. Baby oil can be used as a cleaner if you are afraid of the cleaners that are on the market.

    I use Dorothy Dent's painting medium instead of linseed oil.

    I think the important thing is to have a well ventilated room. I have never used tupertine and would not let students use it.

    Retouch Varnish and other varnishes are not user friendly, but they sure make the paintings look better and last longer.

    My favorite paints are Permalba. They are not as expensive as Grumbacher or Winsor&Newton.
    Since Permalba was made user friendly, it doesn't last as long in the tube, but does not have the harmful chemicals that the old oil paints had.

    Winsor & Newton's student grade paint winton is inexpensive, but if a person paints professionally, she would want the professional paint.
     

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