Baptist Succession Back to Christ:

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by JC, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. JC

    JC
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    The "Dyer to Jerusalem" list of links entitled, Baptist Succession Back To Christ, first appeared in The Baptist Messenger of Oaklahoma City, OK in April, 1922. It was made famous by Bro Roy Mason's Book, The Church That Jesus Built, first published in 1923, pp. 110-1.

    In researching the various references in this list, I have been unable to find most of them. Several of the names of men and places in this list are found no where else so far as my reading extends.

    Internally, the list is very supicious. For example, the reference to Armitage (History of the Baptists, p. 182)in link 11 is there but the author confused the info pertaining to Hippolytus referring it to Tertullian. The author seems to have thought the Tiber was a mountain, because he refers to the "foot". I have been unable to locate any of the other references in the books cited, e.g., Philadelphia Associational Minutes; Munston's History of the Alps; Jones' Church History; Neander's Church History; Mosheim's History. Some of the books listed I have never seen.

    J.B. Jetter is an unknown person and I suggest the author meant J.B. Jeter. Somehow "Dyersburg" in the origianl got transposed into "Dyer". H. Roller, Aaron Arlington, Balcolao, Archer Flavin, and Adromicus seem lost as to history. Several of the places named are also illusive.

    The original article in the Messenger (which I examined recently) has this note:
    "Dr. Putnam of Tuttle gave this to Rev. J. E. Akins, who sends it to the Messenger."

    What do you make of this list? Has anyone found any of these references?

    By grace only,

    JC
     
  2. rsr

    rsr
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    To take them somewhat in order:

    Armitage, whether one accepts the Pseudo-Tertullian references, is an odd duck to induct into the Landmark pantheon.

    "The very attempt to trace an unbroken line of persons duly baptized upon their personal trust in Christ, or of ministers ordained by lineal descent from the apostles, or of churches organized upon these principles, and adhering to the New Testament in all things, is in itself an attempt to erect a bulwark of error. Only God can make a new creature; and the effort to trace Christian history from regenerate man to regenerate man, implies that man can impart some power to keep up a succession of individual Christians. Apply the same thought to groups of churches running down through sixty generations, and we have precisely the same result."

    — Thomas Armitage, A History of the Baptists, 1890

    Munston's "Israel of the Alps" does exist and it essentially a polemic in favor of Waldensian successionism.

    The Philadelphia Association minutes probably exist, but not on the Internet.

    Mosheim is a respected historian for his time, but he pretty much ended with the original Reformation.

    Jones' and Meander's histories exist but have fallen out of favor.

    You are correct in identifying J.B. Jeter, first acting secretary of the SBC Foreign Mission Board and hymnal author.
     
  3. rlvaughn

    rlvaughn
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    Minutes of the Philadelphia Baptist Association from 1707-1807 can be purchased in a bound edition - e.g., see Particular Baptist Press.

    Most of the others are probably only available in a library or possibly once in awhile on e-bay or a used book distributor. They are A History of the Christian Church, from the Birth of Christ to the Eighteenth Century by William Jones (1819), Israel of the Alps by Alexander Munston, Institutes of Ecclesiastical History by Johann Mosheim (ca. 1750s), and General History of the Christian Religion and Church, by Augustus Neander (ca. 1840s).
     
  4. rsr

    rsr
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    Thank you.
    Not a bad buy, given the nature of the publication.

    Munston's book is readily available on line; Mosheim is pricey, especially if you want it translated into English. Neander is very affordable in an abridged edition. I haven't been able to find a good source for Jones, other than as part of a digital collection.
     
  5. R. Charles Blair

    R. Charles Blair
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    JC - I note that others have answered most of your questions, but as one who lives within 2 hours of both places, let me assure you that it is "Dyer," Tennessee. There is also a
    "Dyersburg," much larger, but I once had a student who came out of the FBC Dyer. Incidentally, he had never heard of Roy Mason's work, and neither had the pastor there! Does that prove that FBC Dyer is not the church mentioned in that list? Recall that Spurgeon, growing up in an evangelical pastor's home in London, saved in a Methodist meeting, had at that point never heard of Baptists, though there were many in London. One benefit of something like this board is that at least we can get somewhat acquainted with one another - if we can stop yelling long enough! Best - Charles Blair - Rom. 8:28
     

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