Baptists who started other movements....

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Heavy Metal Calvinist, Nov 29, 2005.

  1. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    William Miller became a Baptist Preacher back in 1833. From what I read, he was in love with eschatology and took note of current events. He picked and missed a date of Christ's return, a return that would fit somewhere into between 1843-1844. Apparently, from this date-setting error, a new movement arose.

    I wander how many other "Baptists" have launcehed new groups, movements, off-shoots, even cults. Interesting topic, I think....
     
  2. rsr

    rsr
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    There is the strange case of Sidney Rigdon, who was ordained in a Baptist church in Ohio in 1820. He pastored the FBC in Pittsburgh, which split after Rigdon began espousing the views of Alexander Campbell. He helped write the preface for Campbell's "A Debate on Christian Baptism," but he broke with Campbell after Campbell opposed Rigdon's plan for communal living.

    Rigdon joined the Mormons in 1831 and became a top adviser to Joseph Smith and helped work on Smith's new Bible translation and the Pearl of Great Price. He is credited with developing a good deal of Mormon theology and practice, but he lost out in the power struggle after Smith's death and moved with some followers back to Pennsylvania, where he founded a Church of Christ, which soon folded. He lated founded the Church of Jesus Christ of the Children of Zion, which lasted a couple of decades.
     
  3. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    Never had heard of Rigdon. He really went downhill fast in 11 years. Thanks for that info.

    I am reading Ruth A. Tucker's "Another Gospel" and she highlights Hobart Freeman in her first chapter. Freeman had a degree from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and From Grace TS in Indiana. He became a prof at Grace TS and was apprently fired for bad theology. His fringe group caused the deaths of 52 people, according to Fort Wayne's "The News Sentinetal" 2 May 1983 cover story.

    Tucker's book is where I got Miller's story, too. Strange that these "Baptists" (some who may have seemed strong or orthodox) fell into apostasy and strange doctrine. Maybe someone will steal my idea, but one may find enough info to write "When Baptists Go Bad." I am sure that my mother-in-law would buy it (ha-ha).

    I am really developing a love to study Church History, though. Not at all a boring subject.
     
  4. rlvaughn

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    Several pentecostal/holiness bodies came (some in varying degrees) from the Baptists, including:

    Church of God Mountain Assembly and various splits

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_God_%28Cleveland%29 = Church of God Cleveland, TN and various splits

    Even one stream that flowed into the Assemblies_of_God poured from a Baptist spring.

    Some even retain Baptist in their name:

    Holiness Baptist Association
    Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church

    P.S. - you'll have to paste the Church of God (Cleveland) in your browser. BB won't take a html tag with parentheses, but it does in fact have parentheses, so I couldn't figure out what else to do.
     
  5. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    This sort of answers a question that I posed in another thread on the Keswick movement.

    http://www.baptistboard.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/3/3243.html#000002

    I looked up "Pentecostal Free Will Baptist Church" and note that "The doctrine is a mixture of Baptist and Pentecostal beliefs. Santification as a second work of grace, Baptism of the Holy Ghost, tongues, and divine healing are important aspects of the Pentecostal renewal."

    Man- that is a doozy. Chariscalminianism, I guess. :eek:
     
  6. rsr

    rsr
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    To add to rlvaughn's comments, C.H. Mason, founder of the Church of God in Christ, was originally a Missionary Baptist. Eudorus N. Bell, a former Southern Baptist pastor, was primary founder of the Assemblies of God.

    The Keswick Movement, to my understanding, was largely influenced by the American Holiness movement and in turn came back across the Pond.

    As to the Free Will Pentecostal Baptists — given an Arminian theology and a Wesleyan view of sanctification, it is only another step to Pentecostalism. (Not one that was always taken, however; Holiness influence continued — and still continues — within the larger Baptist world, and some Holiness groups — such as the Church of the Nazarene and the Wesleyan Church — did not go down the Pentecostal path.)
     
  7. Gayla

    Gayla
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    I have heard that the Church of Christ was founded by a former Baptist named Campbell.

    Is that Alexander Campbell that rsr mentions above?
     
  8. rsr

    rsr
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    A good many Baptists consider Campbell never to have been a Baptist at all.

    Some Campbell adherents concur — "He was never in full faith and fellowship with the Baptist Church. He was baptized by a Baptist preacher and affiliated in a rather loose way with the Baptist Church while he was groping in darkness. But soon the light of God's truth dawned upon his soul and he ignored the claims of the Baptist Church upon him and pursued a course independent of the Baptist Church," wrote biographer H. Leo Boles — although he initially accepted the identity — as biographer Errett Gates said, "To all intents and purposes Campbell became a Baptist and deliberately and frankly accepted the denominational status which it gave him."

    Briefly, he was a Presbyterian who broke with Presbyterianism and was baptized by a Baptist minister; his Brush Run Church later was received into the Redstone Baptist Association. It was not a happy sojourn. His teaching on baptism, Christology and regeneration — in particular — caused immense dissension within the Baptist ranks: Some associations split over Campbell's Restoration movement, while others were taken over entirely.

    The Redstone Association disfellowshipped Campbell and his father in 1824, and in 1830 it specified that the action was "on account of being erroneous in doctrine, maintaining, namely, the essential derivation and inferiority of the true and proper Deity of Christ and the Spirit; that faith in Christ is only a belief of historical facts, recorded in the Scriptures, rejecting and deriding what is commonly called Christian experience; that there is no operation of the Spirit on the hearts of men, since the days of Pentecost, &c." For their part, Campbell's followers say they separated from their Baptist association in Kentucky in 1830.

    In 1832, Campbell's "Disciples of Christ" united with Barton Stone's "Christians" to form the Disciples of Christ (Christian Church.) In 1906, the Campbell followers became the Churches of Christ and descendants of the Stone faction became the Disciples of Christ. The Disciples split again in the 20th century; the Christian Church/Churches of Christ left over what they saw as increasing denominationalism within the Disciples.

    The Campbell branch of Restoration movement (as the Stone-Campbell movement calls itself) caused bad blood between the Churches of Christ and the Baptists, and some of the wounds have not yet healed.

    As the Dover Baptist Association in Virginia said in 1832:

     
  9. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    "His teaching on baptism, Christology and regeneration — in particular — caused immense dissension within the Baptist ranks...."

    Some teaching were: "In connection with consideration of Christian baptism, this word refers to the doctrine that believers' baptism is a necessary prerequisite to salvation. It comes from the names of Thomas and Alexander Campbell, two of the fathers of the American Restoration Movement of the 1700s, from which have sprung many denominations, including the Churches of Christ (big C), the churches of Christ (little c), the Christian Churches, and the Disciples of Christ. Campbellism is a form of sacramentalism, and those who adhere to this doctrine are often referred to as Campbellites."

    http://www.angelfire.com/ia/Baptizo/definitions.html

    Are there more points of division here? I wander how they view election....
     
  10. rsr

    rsr
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    They reject that God predestines one to be eternally saved or lost.

    There are many other points of division, some large, some small. The movement is not monolithic; leaders (such as Campbell and Lipscombe) have argued over different basic doctrines, even baptism.
     
  11. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    Any good books on Campbell? Seem he made his mark on KY....

    Here is an irony for you- My wife and I live in the parsonage for a Christian church. The pastor lives elsewhere and we lease here. Nice to see a steeple every morning with the cross shinning, you know. They know me to be SBC, but let me lease anyway, ha-ha.
     
  12. rsr

    rsr
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    I would hesitate to recommend any biography; Campbell was a polarizing figure, and many books about him are written from one bias or the other. There is a wealth of information on the Web.

    Campbell's influence was particularly strong in Kentucky, but he made his mark throughout the west. Leon McBeth, in The Baptist Heritage,said historians estimate at least half of Baptist churches in Kentucky joined the Disciples. But it wasn't only Kentucky; the First Baptist Church of Nashville became a Church of Christ, and the entire Mahoning Association in Ohio went over to the Restorationists.
     
  13. MikeinGhana

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    Was the Greater Grace Outreach Church in Baltimore MD started by a former Baptist?
     
  14. Salty

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    According to the Watchman Fellowship, yes he was a Baptist pastor. Read more in on the link about DR. Carl Stevens
     
  15. John I Morris

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    Well, again I find myself amazed at the information one can aquire by the wisdom of others. Thanks all!!
     
  16. Johnv

    Johnv
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    To date, everyone who has picked a date has been wrong. Yet even today, naive folks flock to these guys like flies to honey. Whassupwiddat?
     
  17. John I Morris

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    The good ole Campbellites are nice people when they want to be, just like anybody else I guess. They are off in their doctrine, but nice folks. I had a really good book on them and loan it out to a friend, I'll have to get it back. It is the best I have ever come across on Thomas and Alexander Campbell and their movement.
     
  18. rlvaughn

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  19. Heavy Metal Calvinist

    Heavy Metal Calvinist
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    To date, everyone who has picked a date has been wrong. Yet even today, naive folks flock to these guys like flies to honey. Whassupwiddat? [/QB][/QUOTE]

    [​IMG] Mat 24:36 But of that day and hour knoweth no one, not even the angels of heaven, neither the Son, but the Father only....

    That sure knocks out a bunch of wild-eyed date-pickers. Miller musta' missed that one.
     

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