Between the .....

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by wpe3bql, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    ..... Testaments.

    I tried contacting about six Evangelical Bible colleges to see if any of them had an undergraduate on-line class on the period of time between the closing of Malachi and the beginning of Matthew.

    I was unsuccessful in all of my attempts.

    My "Plan B" was to order some books from Amazon on the "400 'Silent Years' Period." I chose the following three books:

    1) The Four Hundred Silent Years: (From Malachi to Matthew) by Harry A. Ironside, 1914. (Most of you BB folks I'm sure are aware of the fact that whatever Bro. Ironside wrote is considered a "Classic," at least during his life span here on terra firma.)

    2) Between the Testaments: Pharisees, Sadducees and Essenes by Robert C. Jones, 2013. This appears to be a textbook for a class on this time period because it includes quizzes (with the answers at the end of the book). As you can see by its date, this is obviously a more contemporary work.

    3) Pharisees, Scribes and Sadducees in Palestinian Society: A Sociological Approach by Anthony J. Saldarini, 1988. The author apparently focuses more on how these three groups affected "Palestinian" society rather than a strictly "Jesus vs. 'Them'" work.

    Have any of you BB theological giants ever read any (or all) of these three works (especially #'s 2 & 3)? If you have, what are your comments / thoughts on them?

    Are there any other available books (either from Amazon or elsewhere) that you recommend that cover this period of time?

    I was (and still am) a "History Buff" from way back when, even before my salvation in April, 1966. Now, I know that not everyone enjoys history as much as I do, but, IMHO, God's people ought to know at least something about history---and not strictly as it pertains to what God's Word addresses. (EXAMPLE: If you want to buy a "pre-owned" car, you'd probably want to know something about its history, right?) :smilewinkgrin:

    So..... I welcome your responses to my questions above.
     
  2. HankD

    HankD
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    If you can, get your hands on a copy of an original first edition 1611 King James Bible.
    Try to get a Roman font reproduction because the Gothic font is difficult on the eyes.

    A little known fact among Christendom is that it contains the Books of the Apocrypha between the Old and New testaments some of which contains inter-testamental history.

    This caused a lot of verbal rhetorical tap dancing by the KJVO folks.

    You could easily get a Douay-Rheims (Catholic Bible) which also contains the Apocryphal books.

    HankD
     
  3. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    Hank, ole boy, WPE3BQL has before him a 1982 product from Thomas Nelson Publishers. Evidently this was part of its way of introducing the NKJV version.

    It's a slip cased product containing the NKJV, and The Holy Bible, 1611 Edition King James Version: A word-for-word reprint of the First Edition of the Authorized Version presented in roman letters for easy reading and comparison with subsequent editions.

    You'll never ever guess what's in this tome between the end of Malachi and "The Newe Teftament our Lord and Sauiour Iesvs Christ." (It actually is about 20+% of the entire text.) :smilewinkgrin:

    Don't know if it's still available after some 30+ years, but its IBSN is 0-8407-0042-3 .

    And, yes, I've gotten the same "song and dance routine" from these KJVO dudes too. :thumbsup:
     
  4. Zenas

    Zenas
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    It's pretty well known that the older KJ Bibles contain the Apocryphal books between the testaments. However, except for 1 & 2 Maccabees, there is nothing in them to learn about the intertestamental period.
     
  5. Jerome

    Jerome
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  6. Zenas

    Zenas
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  7. Deacon

    Deacon
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    Sadly this "classic" has grown a bit moldy over time.
    Information about this period has exploded since it was written.
    You might look for a free Kindle version rather than purchase it.

    I'd suggest whatever introductory book you purchase you also add, IVP's Dictionary of New Testament Background Bible [2000] by Craig A. Evans , Stanley Porter, et. al.

    If you're looking to spend money on college courses you might consider a cheaper alternative, FaithLife's Mobile Ed courses "Between the Testaments Bundle" [LINK] (still in the Pre-Publication phase) by David A. deSilva and Joel Willitts. I don't know when they expect the courses to be ready but would guess within the next year. Check out the promotional videos offered on the site.

    I've purchases a few of the courses and have not been disappointed.
    I've have learned a lot and even shared short portions of the videos with my Adult Sunday School class.

    Rob
     
    #7 Deacon, Jun 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 20, 2015
  8. JamesL

    JamesL
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    It is important to know that "Between the Testaments" is both a casual phrase and a misnomer.

    The New Testament technically began when Jesus died - hence, the blood of a New Covenant. So the gospels are approximately 90% Old Testament period.

    The Christian term for what you're looking for is "Inter-Testament[al] Period"

    The Jewish/secular term is "Second Temple Period"

    If you just want to learn, and don't need college credit, you can google:

    "Gordon.edu second temple period"

    "Second temple period online dissertation"

    Also look here:

    http://michaelsheiser.com/TheNakedBible/2013/01/online-dissertations-biblical-studies/



    .
     
  9. wpe3bql

    wpe3bql
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    Deacon:

    I'm sure it'd be a good course, but $360.00 is a bit out of my price range.
     
  10. Deacon

    Deacon
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    Yeah, mine too.

    Rob
     
  11. HankD

    HankD
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    That depends. i.e. both Tobit and Ecclesiasticus (NOT to be confused with the Book of Ecclesiastes) were both written around 200BC and are advisory books to keep the Law of Moses in spite of prevailing hopelessness.

    They give a view of Jewish thought during the inter-testamental period.

    HankD
     

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