Bible Frustration

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Van, Sep 30, 2016.

  1. Van

    Van
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    When asked what frustrates Bible readers, not understanding it ranks quite high, about 15%.

    The four mostly read versions were the KJV, NKJV, ESV and NIV.

    Kinda makes you wonder whether ambiguity to preserve a possible range of meanings is such a virtue?
     
  2. InTheLight

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    If 15% is high, what are the rankings of the other frustrations? How many readers of each version say that not understanding it is their frustration?

    You've given us no useful data.
     
  3. Revmitchell

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    It doesn't matter how its translated the fact is they will still "feel" frustrated with understanding it. They do not want to study, research, and pray over it. They just want the meaning to fall into their laps with little to no effort from themselves.
     
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  4. Van

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    Hi ITL, I thought it was useful. But I did not see where you addressed the question?
    Hi RM, yes Bible readers have a range of faults, including a desire to instant understanding rather than studied understand. But I am looking at how we might improve the translations, rather than the readers.
    BTW, I am not trying to make one translation look less frustrating than another, I am looking at how all translations might be improved to provide greater understanding of the readers.
     
  5. Rippon

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    What survey are you citing? The NLTse is more highly read than the ESV.
     
  6. Rippon

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    "Studied understand" does not make any sense.

    Also, it should not be "a desire to instant understanding" but "a desire for instant understanding."
    A better way of expressing your idea is "I think that translations should try to enhance the readers' understanding of the text."
     
  7. InTheLight

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    That's because your post did not establish that there is ambiguity across various translations. Essentially, you are begging the question.
     
  8. Van

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    Hi ITL, as I have indicated before, perhaps you should study what the bible says about fault finders.
    And you still did not answer the question.

    It seems possible no one on this forum even understands the question. Or has interest in discussing how translations might be improved. What we have here is a failure to communicate.
     
  9. Van

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    What would you say is the most significant frustration when it comes to reading the Bible?

    33% Not enough time
    13% Language is difficult to relate to.
    7% Cannot find the verse or story of interest.
    7% Do not understand background or history

    Not enough time sounds to me like a rationalization. IOW, an excuse for lack of engagement.

    Language is difficult seems to target archaic words and idioms (i.e. ESV, KJV, and NKJV). But vague or obscure verbiage would also be in view, i.e. work of God rather than work God requires of you.

    The inability to find something seems to reflect on the age of the respondents, i.e they do not know how to use computer search engines or an Exhaustive Concordance.

    The lack of understanding of background or history could be filed under "you can't please everybody all the time." On one side we have those who want to bridge the gap by rewriting scripture to make it sound like it was written for todays's audience, and on the other, people who want it to say what it actually says, and let us through study figure out how it would apply to us.
     
  10. rsr

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    1. I would have thought 15 percent would be a pretty low "reason" for frustration.

    2. You are attempting to tie specific translations to "ambiguity," assuming that "ambiguity" is the reason for frustration. Don't recall that fact is in evidence.

    3. Sometimes the text is ambiguous. Sometimes attempting to provide perfect clarity is unwarranted by the text, which is what it is, not what you want it to be.
     
  11. Van

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    If I were trying to state a fact, it would not have been a question. Do you have an answer?
     
  12. rsr

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    Posing a statement as a question is a time-honored rhetorical device.

    The answer to the question: No.
     
  13. Van

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    So we have one view that ambiguity on purpose does not contribute to reader frustration, or whatever the resulting frustration, it is a worthwhile price for the practice. On the other hand, presenting the likely meaning with clarity in the main text, and footing alternate understandings seems a far better approach.
     

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