Books on a biblical theology of work

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by evangelist6589, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    It seems that every career book I have claims to be christian yet speaks about fulfillment, satisfaction, getting my desires met, and such as the bottom line goal to work. They all have good tips on resumes, and interviewing, but the bottom line philosophy seems to be more humanistic than Biblical.

    I have searched for more biblical career books but cant find any departing from this philosophy which is the norm these days. The book Disciplines of a Godly man then is the best with its chapter on work. According to kent Hughes the goal in work is not me being fulfilled, and getting my desires met, but it is glorifying Christ. Career authors cannot sell such a book and make money in todays market.

    Anyone know of a good career book following this philosophy?


    John
     
  2. preacher4truth

    preacher4truth
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    I wish I did bro. Not to sound spirtual or anything, but the best bet is Biblical principles on the matter at hand.

    The sad thing is, we have marketing targeted to tickle ears designed to pander toward selfishness. This is a fulfillment of 2 Timothy 4:3.

    The staus quo you've ran into is one other reason I reject any theology that is man centered. The road we are on has been paved by theologies centered on mans goodness and abilities instead of Gods Sovereignty and glory.

    - Peace
     
  3. evangelist6589

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    What do you mean by man centered? I mean the books do have good principles, and good advice, and scripture. But scripture is often taken out of context with the intent to find the dream job.
     
  4. preacher4truth

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    Well I mean just what I said bro. We have man-centered theology today that on its extreme end it goes into WOF types. These would be likened to the ministries of Copeland, Meyer, Hinn &c. Keep in mind that these teach, especially on the Copeland end, but it is also in others, that God is helpless until man allows God in by choosing. I'm certain you are aware how these see "faith" as a "power source" residing within man which goes back to Satans lie "ye shall be as gods." This is also seen within other theologies, and this point about "God restrained until" is incorrect whether it is coming from the Copeland types or from the Baptist preacher down the street. God is not restrained prior to our choice; He's Sovereign and accomplishes all His Purpose and Will. We can easily see where these types of theologies continue their focus; it's upon man and what he can get, be &c. It starts subtiley, and is to be avoided.

    But we have other similar types of theology wherein mans abilities, glory, gain, success, leadership v. servanthood, self-centeredness, selfishness, power of choice, prosperity, among other things that center upon man. This would be akin to Osteen, Schuller, and other similar types of minisry. Again, we can see strains of this also within other theologies that place man at the forefront, exalt man, choice &c.

    My contention is that these types of theologies have lent themselves toward the types of books you are running across, with their focus upon man, not upon God. This exact same end is coming out in these books even if the authors are not one of the above by name, because his or her principles are of the same theological focus, and that is a man first theology.

    All of these lead to an incorrect interpretation and application of Scriptures, focusing and centering upon mans power, gain and desires. The problem with these is that they are breaking at the least the first, second and last commandment concerning not worshipping God first, idolatry and covetousness respectively.

    - Peace
     
    #4 preacher4truth, Jan 6, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 6, 2012
  5. glfredrick

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    Work is an anthropological issue... That's why all the books about work are about people working.

    We can draw theological distinctions about work from observing Father and Son at work (and He had some things to say to us about work). And we can draw some distinctions about work from the other characters in Scripture.

    We work by the sweat of our brow, i.e., it will not come easy to us. We work because we must eat, i.e., the man who does not work should not eat. We work because God told us to work.

    IF we are able to find some level of satisfaction in our work that is a plus, and further IF we are doing the work that God has built and equipped us to do that work can very well be satisfying.

    You might want to try this book by Ben Witherington III:

    http://books.google.com/books/about/Work.html?id=OZdw5UkhAUUC

    http://www.christianbook.com/work-a...=867862&event=ESRCQ&view=details#endorsements

    Witherington is not a Baptist, so be prepared to see some Arminian/Wesleyan doctrine included. Otherwise, he is a noted theologian who is not completely out in left field.
     
  6. evangelist6589

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    Thank you so much for this book recommendation. Yeah I have sermons by John MacArthur, Charles Stanley, James MacDonald, and Erwin Lutzer whom all agree and hold to a biblical theology of work. Erwin Lutzer in his latest book has a chapter on vocation that is well written. This book looks like it has more detail. I hope this book does not read from the perspective that I need to find my dream job and should only work in a dream job. Does it?


     
  7. glfredrick

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    If it did, then it would not be a "theology" of work, but rather a "self-help" book.
     
  8. JesusFan

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    actually, might be good to reasd a good commentary on life of Joseph, in order to see how one can content and confident in will of God, secure in that, even in really tough times!

    And that we can be confident that despite what we endure, God will in the end work it out for the best!

    And remember that ANY job that we do, as long as do it as unto the Lord, is a "God job!"
     
  9. evangelist6589

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    Amen but try reasoning with someone whom loves books like "quitter", "thou shall prosper", "the millionaire mind" among others. They always tell me to stop focusing on negatives and to take action. They tell me its all in the mind. They love to cherry pick the bible for the prayer of Jabez, or what not, etc.. They always take it out of context and call me a divisive, and argumentative person. My goodness!
     

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