Brit Hume: CDC Director’s Ebola Claims ‘Manifestly Not True’

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by Revmitchell, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    After a contentious interview with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden, Megyn Kelly invited Fox News’ Brit Hume to give his take on the Ebola crisis Tuesday. Hume accused Frieden of making claims that were “manifestly not true,” and for giving excuses for not imposing a travel ban that made “no sense”:

    “I struggle with the fact that some of the things he was saying to you, that the information was clear and that it was correct and all that, was manifestly not true based on what he himself ultimately conceded during the course of the interview.

    His explanation, like previous ones that have been given for not imposing a travel ban in order to keep people from those infected areas out of this country for the time being, I thought makes no sense. I mean, you would not need to have actual bans on flights, Megyn, you could do it through the visa system, where you simply would not allow people with visas from those countries to come here for now.

    Flights could come and go, and it wouldn’t keep people from going there. So I think the explanation is weak. And it leads to the suspicion I think among people watching who are worried about this that we’re not being told the whole truth about this. That may be on some basis unfair, but I think that’s what fans the flame of alarm here that they’re trying so hard to avoid.”

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/10/14/brit-hume-cdc-director-ebola-claims-manifestly-not-true-video/
     
  2. Deacon

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    There has been quite a lot coming from the administrative staff of the CDC that I've questioned.

    As a health professional myself I do not see any aggressive quarantine measures, nor any proactive training or mobilization of resources.

    Just lot of talking heads - filled with hot air.

    Rob
     
  3. InTheLight

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    Something must be going on. Obama canceled a fund raiser in New Jersey to have a cabinet meeting about ebola. :tonofbricks:

    Heard today that tuberculosis kills more people in Africa in a day than ebola has done up until now. Same thing with malaria. I guess since these other endemics are not "media hot" right now, you don't hear too much about them.

    [​IMG]

    http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2014/10/ebola-graphics
     
  4. Revmitchell

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    Malaria and other things have been going on for years and they are not a problem in the US. What is so called "hot" right now is a new threat in the US. So it is "hot" right now and rightly so.
     
  5. Deacon

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    Obama has proven that its his image he's concerned about.
    I'm not highly encouraged about his meetings with dysfunctional administrative CDC officials and cabinet members that he hasn't listened to in a long time.

    There are already programs set up to deal with malaria and TB. The problem and its solution is simply to educate the populous. Those that fail to learn, die.

    Ebola is a wildcard. Its rapid infection to death rate minimizes an effective immune response by its victims.

    Its highly contagious nature insures its continued presence and rapid spread.

    Its the perfect viral storm... coming soon to a neighborhood near you.

    Rob
     
  6. Revmitchell

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    After his link and graph it still only took one post to shoot it all down.
     
  7. InTheLight

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    Oh, please tell me what was shot down?

    Was the fact that TB and malaria kill more than ebola shot down? No.

    Was the fact that Obama canceled a fundraiser shot down? No.

    Was the fact that TB and malaria is not in the news shot down? No.

    Just what was disproven? Nothing.

    Deacon added more facts and clarity to the discussion. You? Not so much.
     
  8. Revmitchell

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    Just stop your pathetic. You tried to spin away the seriousness of ebola by trying to compare it to something that has been around for years and the nature of which is far different. You added nothing to this but your spin.

    Even the CDC has admitted the intitial response to this was much slower than it needed to be. While all the biased news sources have been working in a fervor to down play this people in the health industry have been saying things in just the opposite direction. Much like in this thread.

    What is interesting is found in the comments section of the site you brought the graph from:

     
    #8 Revmitchell, Oct 16, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 16, 2014
  9. Revmitchell

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  10. Revmitchell

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    1.4 million: The number of Ebola cases expected by Jan. 20, 2015, if nothing changes in the way patients are treated.

    Ebola cases in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. The dark color shows real cases and the light color shows projected.

    71%: The death rate of this epidemic: The percentage of people who, after becoming infected with Ebola, die as a direct result of the virus.
    718: Number of new Ebola cases between Sept. 8 and Sept. 14 in Liberia, Guinea, and Sierra Leone, as reported by the WHO.
    Weekly incidence of ebola cases

    14,607: The approximate number undetected Ebola cases.
    The official case count is 5,843, including 2,803 deaths (according to the WHO), but the CDC predicts the actual number of cases is 2.5 times higher than the official figure.

    15 days: The time it takes for Ebola cases to double in Liberia, according to CDC estimates. In Sierra Leone, cases are doubling every 30 days.
    82%: The percentage of Ebola patients in Liberia who are being cared for outside hospitals or other isolated settings necessary to reduce the risk of transmission. To stop the epidemic from spreading further, this number needs to be 30% or lower.
    Where Liberian Ebola patients are being cared for

    21 days: The time it can take a person infected with the Ebola virus to develop physical symptoms.
    While people are not infectious until they develop symptoms, the longer a virus has incubated in someone, the lower their chances of getting rapid treatment and recovering.


    49 days: The number of days after recovery that a man previously infected with Ebola can still transmit the virus through his semen.
    14x: The number of times larger the current Ebola eruption is than the last largest outbreak, which hit 425 cases in Uganda in 2000.
    As of March 2014, the current flare-up was already eight times the size of that outbreak. As of Sept. 2014, more people have been infected and died of Ebola than as a result of all the previous outbreaks combined.


    20x: The number of times more health personnel needed to beat back the epidemic, according to the WHO. That's 20,000 national and 1,000 international staff.
    54.2%: The percentage of health care workers who have died after becoming infected with the virus, despite being well-informed and having full access to treatment.

    2nd: Sierra Leone's global ranking in terms of real GDP growth rate in 2013,before the Ebola outbreak. Liberia held position 11.
    For some perspective, the United States was 157th. This is significant when you think about how well the country was doing — in a pure economic sense — before Ebola hit. After the outbreak, this is likely to drop drastically and all the progress the country has been making will be lost.



    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/scary-ebola-facts-and-numbers-2014-9#ixzz3GINhHIAK
     
  11. Deacon

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  12. ShagNappy

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    Ebola is a nice excuse for Martial Law... nice timing, just before elections.

    *sheesh... feel like Poncho.
     
  13. ShagNappy

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    A Pastor must be gentle - not quick-tempered (Titus 1:7; 1 Tim 3:3)
    A Pastor must be peaceful - not violent (Titus 1:7; 1 Tim 3:3)
    A Pastor must be spiritually Mature (1 Tim 3:6)
    A Pastor must be respectable (1 Tim 3:7)

    A Pastor must be humble - not arrogant (Titus 1:7)
    A Pastor must be spiritually Mature (1 Tim 3:6)
    A Pastor must be respectable (1 Tim 3:7)
     

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