Burning Translators

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Phillip, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. Phillip

    Phillip
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    John Wicliffe translated the Vulgate to English, which was the first English translation; so, people didn't have a problem since there was no other English version.

    His translation was completed in 1382 and he died in 1384.

    In 1414 it became a Capital Offense to "read an English Bible". So, they dug up his bones thirty years later and burned his bones by the stake.

    It is said that recently there was a survey of translators of which 98% said that if this were to be the case they would prefer to be burned at the stake thirty years after they died rather than while they were alive still alive. If you were a translator and it became a capital offense which way would you vote? :laugh::laugh::laugh:
     
  2. Tom Bryant

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    yep, would definitely rather be burned after I was dead... so did the other 2% just not understand the question?:tongue3:
     
  3. Phillip

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    That was my question. The professor who said this in class didn't elaborate.
     
  4. Salty

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    Was he talking about Clinton and Carter? :smilewinkgrin:
     
  5. dwmoeller1

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    They could have been thinking about it being better to suffer for Christ vs. a normal death with no suffering.
     
  6. Tom Bryant

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    Maybe they were KJVO and thot if they participated in a translation, they ought to be burned at the stake! :tongue3:
     
  7. TCassidy

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    Wycliffe was burned for heresy which, it was claimed, sparked the "Peasents Revolt." The "Wycliffe Movement" was violently suppressed but that was well after Wycliffe was dead.

    There is no historical evidence that he was burned due to his bible translating. It was more likely a response to his views on the limites of the Papacy and his outright attacks on Monasticism. :)
     
  8. Rippon

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    There were other English translations made before Wycliffe's time. But they were only portions of the New Testament primarily. Also,a lot of them were paraphrases. But that's okay,a good paraphrase can still communicate the Word of God.

    John Wycliffe didn't do much of the translation of the earlier so-called Wycliffe Bible released in 1382. John Purvery Nicholas of Hereford likely did most of the work.

    The second Wycliffe Bible released in 1388 or 1395 or so was more idiomatic than the first one.


    Actually it was 44 years later in 1428.
     
  9. TCassidy

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    The first known bible in English was the Lindisfarne Gospels dating to about 700 A.D. These were in Latin with an Anglo-Saxon interlinear translation added about 950 A.D.

    In about 1000 A.D., Aelfric translated a condensed version of the first seven books of the Old Testament. However, due to the Norman invasion in 1066, French became the dominant language of England, and the Anglo-Saxon tongue became obsolete.

    In the fourteenth century, English was again dominant, and by the fifteenth century French had almost disappeared.

    In about 1300 the Ormulum appeared, translated by Orm, an Augustinian monk. This work was originally the Gospels, but later Genesis and Exodus were translated into English.

    About the same time, Richard Rolle translated the Psalms into Early Middle English, of which 170 manuscripts still survive.

    John Wycliffe (1330-1384) was the first known translator of the entire Bible into English.
     
  10. Rippon

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    That's not true. The majority of the common people still spoke English. The authorities spoke Norman/French. The latter constituted the minority.

    A number of historians believe that John Wycliffe did very little,if any translating.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    I read that 4 out of 5 people suffer from constipation on occasion. That makes me wonder if 1 out of 5 ENJOY constipation?

    If I am to be burned, might God give grace to endure such. But given the choice of dying quietly in my bed after eating a steak or being burned at the stake, my choice is the former.
     

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