Call on the name of the Lord

Discussion in 'Free-For-All Archives' started by Kathryn, Jul 26, 2003.

  1. Kathryn

    Kathryn
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    Is to call on the name of the Lord a one time event? Or, is it part of an ongoing commitment and relationship with Jesus Christ, according to the Bible?

    I believe to “call on the name of the Lord” is an ongoing lifelong dependency on God, not a one time event in the past. I hope that everyone here calls on the name of the Lord everyday of his or her life.

    Some here have said they never pray to Jesus Christ, only the Father, but here is a simple prayer said by millions for close to 2000 years:

    “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, have mercy on me a sinner.”

    God Bless
     
  2. Carson Weber

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    To "call on the name of the Lord" would mean, in First Century Jewish ears, to make an oath (Latin: sacramentum), thereby entering into a covenant. A promise is upgraded to an oath through this oath-swearing that occurs when one "calls on the name of the Lord". Essentially, this occurs in baptism, when one is baptized in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

    For a 21st c. American, 20 centuries separated from First Century Jewish culture, we wouldn't recognize the import of this passage - instead, we devise "altar calls" (an altar presupposes a sacrifice to be offered upon the altar, which makes you wonder why it's called an 'altar call' to begin with if the Lord's Supper isn't considered a sacrifice by our separated brethren) and "the sinner's prayer", which are good but not enough to enter into covenant, the New Covenant.
     
  3. Kathryn

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    Thanks for the input, Carson. This is very significant it seems to me.

    God Bless
     
  4. John Gilmore

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    The Kyrie (Kyrie Eleison, Christe Eleison, Kyrie Eleison):

    Lord, have mercy upon us.
    Christ, have mercy upon us.
    Lord, have mercy upon us.

    In the Kyrie, we call upon the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. We approach Him as miserable beggars pleading for mercy.
     
  5. John Gilmore

    John Gilmore
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    We return to our Baptism each day as we call upon the name of the Lord through repentance and faith.

     
  6. Kathryn

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    It is interesting here how this verse doesn't say: Call on His name, your sins get covered over, and sometime later get baptized.

    It says clearly:
    God Bless
     
  7. Kathryn

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    John: The similarities are striking between the Lutherans and Catholics. I read on a website:
    http://www.its.caltech.edu/~tan/bachbminor/luther.html

    I also read that Lutherans make the sign of the cross and say "In the name of the Father, and the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen".

    I am glad that these ancient rites and prayers are respected.

    Do Lutherans believe that baptism washes away sin as in Acts 22:16?

    God Bless
     
  8. Brother Adam

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    yes they do, in reference to the Lutherans
     
  9. Kathryn

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    Thanks, Adam. I am glad Lutherans have this understanding.
     
  10. Brother Adam

    Brother Adam
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    no prob. I was Lutheran for about 13-14 years.
     
  11. John Gilmore

    John Gilmore
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    Kathryn,

    Luther’s goal was to reform the mass, not abolish it. Most of the ancient offices have been retained including the entire series of Introits, Collects, Epistles, and Gospels dating from the time of Charlemagne. The Common Service of the Lutheran Church is probably more traditional than your current mass.

    Yes, all Lutherans believe in Baptismal regeneration. The Holy Spirit creates faith through Baptism. Here is a lovely infant Baptismal hymn.

     
  12. Kathryn

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    Beautiful Hymn!
     
  13. John Gilmore

    John Gilmore
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    In this hymn, we call upon the Holy Ghost:

    Come, Holy Ghost, in love
    Shed on us from above
    Thine own bright ray.
    Divinely good Thou art;
    Thy sacred gifts impart
    To gladden each sad heart.
    Oh, come today!
    2. Come, tenderest Friend and best,
    Our most delightful Guest,
    With soothing power.
    Rest which the weary know,
    Shade mid the noontide glow,
    Peace when deep griefs o'erflow,
    Cheer us this hour.
    3. Come, Light serene and still,
    Our inmost bosoms fill,
    Dwell in each breast.
    We know no dawn but Thine;
    Send forth Thy beams divine
    On our dark souls to shine
    And make us blest.
    4. Exalt our low desires,
    Extinguish passion's fires,
    Heal every wound.
    Our stubborn spirits bend,
    Our icy coldness end,
    Our devious steps attend
    While heavenward bound.
    5. Come, all the faithful bless;
    Let all who Christ confess
    His praise employ.
    Give virtue's rich reward,
    Victorious death accord
    And, with our glorious Lord,
    Eternal joy.


    Veni, Creator Spiritus
     
  14. Kathryn

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    John: Just for a little historical backround, that hymn was written by a devout Catholic, King Robert II of France, also called Robert the Pius.


    http://www.cyberhymnal.org/htm/c/o/comehgil.htm

    Come, Holy Ghost, in love, shed on us from above
    Thine own bright ray! Divinely good Thou art;
    Thy sacred gifts impart to gladden each sad heart.
    O come today!

    Come, tenderest Friend, and best, our most delightful Guest,
    With soothing power. Rest, which the weary know,
    Shade, mid the noontide glow. Peace when deep griefs overflow.
    Cheer us this hour!

    Come, Light serene and still, our inmost bosoms fill,
    Dwell in each breast. We know no dawn but Thine;
    Send forth Thy beams divine on our dark souls to shine
    And make us blessed.

    Exalt our low desires, extinguish passion’s fires,
    Heal every wound. Our stubborn spirits bend,
    Our icy coldness end, our devious steps attend
    While heavenward bound.

    Come, all the faithful bless, let all who Christ confess
    His praise employ; give virtue’s rich reward,
    Victorious death accord, and, with our glorious Lord,
    Eternal joy!

    Words: King Robert II of France (972-1031); translated to English by Ray Palmer, 1858, in his Poetical Works (New York: 1876).


    http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_II_of_France


    Robert II, the Pious (972 - 1031) was King of France from 996 to 1031. A member of the Capetian Dynasty, Robert II was born on March 27, 972 in Orleans, France, the son of King Hugh Capet (938-996) and Adelaide of Aquitaine (952-1004).

    In 987, Robert’s father had the nobles crown him as successor at Orléans on December 30th, thereby confirming the house of Capet as rulers of France. After Robert became king he did as his father and crowned his eldest son Hugh as his successor. But, due to Prince Hugh's death, another son, Henri, became king.

    Robert, despite marital problems that saw him temporarily excommunicated by Pope Gregory V, was a very devout Roman Catholic, hence the name Robert the Pious. He was very musically inclined and was a composer, a chorister, and a poet, making his palace a place of religious seclusion, where he conducted the matins and vespers in his royal robes. Part of Robert's piety at the time, was because he did not tolerate heretics and harshly punished them.

    The kingdom Robert inherited was not large, and in an effort to increase his power, he vigorously pursued his claim to any of the feudal lands as they became vacant which action usually resulted in war with a counter-claimant. In 1003, his invasion of Burgundy was thwarted and it would not be until 1016 that he was finally able to get the support of the Church and be recognized as the Duke of Burgundy.

    The pious King Robert II made few friends and many enemies, including his own sons Henri and Robert. They turned against their father, in a civil war for power and property. King Robert’s army was beaten and he retreated to Beaugency outside Paris.
    He died in the middle of the war with his sons on July 20, 1031 at Melun, France. He was interred with his third wife, Constance d'Arles (973-July 25, 1032) in Saint Denis Basilica.

    God Bless
     
  15. John Gilmore

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    Kathryn,

    According to The Handbook of the Lutheran Hymnal,

     
  16. Kathryn

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    Catholic sources seem to agree to these three choices.

    God Bless
     
  17. Kathryn

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    We share this one also, written by a Benedictine Monk. This is the one I know best.


    "Come, Holy Ghost, Creator Blest"
    by Rhabanus Maurus, 776-856

    1. Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest,
    Vouchsafe within our souls to rest;
    Come with Thy grace and heavenly aid
    And fill the hearts which Thou hast made.

    2. To Thee, the Comforter, we cry,
    To Thee, the Gift of God Most High,
    The Fount of life, the Fire of love,
    The soul's Anointing from above.

    3. The sevenfold gifts of grace are thine,
    O Finger of the Hand Divine;
    True promise of the Father Thou,
    Who dost the tongue with speech endow.

    4. Thy light to every thought impart
    And shed Thy love in every heart;
    The weakness of our mortal state
    With deathless might invigorate.

    5. Drive far away our wily Foe
    And Thine abiding peace bestow;
    If Thou be our protecting Guide,
    No evil can our steps betide.

    6. Make Thou to us the Father known,
    Teach us the eternal Son to won
    And Thee, whose name we ever bless,
    Of both the Spirit, to confess.

    7. Praise we the Father and the Son
    And Holy Spirit, with them One;
    And may the Son on us bestow
    The gifts that from the Spirit flow! Amen.


    http://www.ctsfw.edu/etext/hymnals/tlh/creator_blest.tlh


    God Bless
     
  18. John Gilmore

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    There is also uncertainty about the authorship of this hymn.

     
  19. Singer

    Singer
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    One of my favorite verses is:

    "Romans 10:9
    That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus,
    and shalt believe in thine heart that God
    hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.


    This would be a good approach to a non-believer who is scheduled to
    die at the hands of capital punishment, or to someone who was going
    down with you on a doomed jetliner.

    I often wonder what MORE we can do to receive Christ and subsequent
    salvation than just what is in that verse. My upbringing in the 2x2 Organization
    that required the need to "profess" to unity with that group of believers always
    seemed questionable. More emphasis was put on separating from other believers
    and churches and following the ways of the "Truth" as they called themselves; than
    there was put on the need to accept Jesus Christ as one's personal Lord and
    saviour. "Follow Jesus" was a common suggestion. Others were "become more like
    Jesus", "listen to the still small voice" and of course the all time favorite to "profess".

    It seemed to me that Romans 10:9 was not thorough enough for these people
    as they required membership in their home meetings and disciplines by the "workers"
    whom they looked up to and reverened.

    It's been 40 years since I left that group; only to learn that Catholicism requires
    much the same thing. Departure from other believers(Protestants) ....the need
    to join their church (Catholic) and high regard (to the point of worship) of their
    leaders (the pope)
    .

    The topic of this thread ([To] call upon the name of the Lord) seems a simple thing
    to me. How could one sect or individual justifiably deride another in their pursuits
    of calling upon the Lord? This is what takes place in these exclusive sects that I have
    mentioned and there are plenty more. The favorite verse seems to hinge on a
    needed action by the participants, and the topic is "Believe". I've been told it is
    not enough to "believe in the name of the Lord", but that it requires me to do this
    and do that and join X Church or (in the case of the 2x2s....No Church) and follow
    the advice of certain leaders because they have the authority based on historical
    proof that makes them superior to others. The 2x2s claim to be based on Christ
    himself and that their mode of worship is what Christ established on earth.....including
    meeting in homes and sending out their ministers (workers) in pairs. Anything
    less than than was a sign of a heretical church. And, all churches themselves were
    said to be manmade and therefore the "blind leading the blind". They said there
    would be many who would say "Lord Lord" and would still be rejected as "I never
    knew you". This preaching would scare many to tow the line and join their ''way'' or
    at least stay in it once involved.

    "I never knew you"........is used by Catholics also. I don't recall Protestant churches
    using scripture in a threatening way for the purpose of exalting itself. The RCC does.
    Our friend, Kelly is busy studying so I can talk safely about her church [​IMG] ......referring to
    the Sabbath thing and the emphasis that the SDA puts on resting on Saturday. Those
    people may have also "called on the Lord" for salvation, but I cannot honor the
    emphasis they put on baptismal regeneration, a succession of papal authority and
    church authority, Sabbath rest etc.

    Can't the prisoner about to receive the death penalty also call upon the name of
    the Lord, confess with the mouth and believe in thy heart unto salvation without
    going to Mass, receiving baptism, or joining one of the many sects or (cults) that
    exist today. The association with one of these sects would only bring approval
    by THAT sect's members and the rest would reject his approach to God anyhow.

    This is what is happening on this forum also.

    In my witnessing, I STOP with Romans 10:9 without suggesting churches
    in a prejudiciall manner.
     
  20. Kathryn

    Kathryn
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    How many different handbooks do you Lutherans have? [​IMG]

    http://www.ctsfw.edu/etext/hymnals/tlh/creator_blest.tlh



    "Come, Holy Ghost, Creator Blest"
    by Rhabanus Maurus, 776-856
    Translated by Edward Caswall, 1814-1878
    Text From:
    THE HANDBOOK TO THE LUTHERAN HYMNAL
    (St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1942)p.174
     

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