Can one be Reformed by Affirming the 5-Points?

Discussion in 'Calvinism/Arminianism Debate' started by evangelist6589, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    I used to think so but I disagree today.

    http://sharperiron.org/forum/thread-distinction-between-reformed-theology-and-reformed-soteriology

    There is a difference between Reformed and Calvinist in Soteriology. Reformed subscribe to some confession, believe in Infant Baptist, and are never Dispensational. Today there are those claiming to be Reformed but are only Calvinist in Soteriology. That makes them Calvinistic and not Reformed. Here ae some examples of Reformed Churches.

    http://www.firstcrcdenver.org
    http://www.faithfpc.org
    http://www.coramdeourc.org

    Here are examples of Calvinist Churches

    http://cowcreekchurch.com/#/about-us/we-believe
    http://ccredding.org
    http://suberroad.org
     
  2. JohnDeereFan

    JohnDeereFan
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    No. The five points of Calvinism are merely a codification of our doctrine. But if one isn't Reformed, why would he affirm them?
     
    #2 JohnDeereFan, Feb 23, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 23, 2014
  3. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    This is not a thread about salvation but about being Reformed.
     
  4. Jerome

    Jerome
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    Yep, they don't necessarily overlap:

    "If they could understand the mystery of predestination, and untie the knotty points of man's free-will and God's fore-ordination, they dream that things then would go well with them, whereas there is no more connection between salvation and the understanding of the mystery of predestination than there is between cracking nuts and healing the sick." —Charles Spurgeon, "A Strange Story"

    "Away with the idea that believing sound Doctrine and chaining ourselves to a cast-iron creed is vital godliness and eternal life! Orthodox sinners will find that Hell is hot, and that their knowledge of Predestination will not yield a cooling drop to their parched tongues." —Charles Spurgeon, "Labour in Vain"
     
  5. JonC

    JonC
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    It depends on who you ask.

    I have friends who are Reformed who would say absolutely not. They see Baptist and Reformed/Calvinist as opposite in regard to belief systems. One has reminded me that the Reformed faith fought harder defending the issue of baptism than “TULIP” and that (to him) paedobaptism (covenant baptism) begins at the heart of the DoG upon which many of us Baptists claim to cling. Just as James Arminius rejected enough of Calvinism to no longer be a Calvinist, so have Baptist who rejected enough of Calvinism that by definition cannot be Reformed or Calvinists (Baptists can be Particular Baptists but not Reformed Baptists or Calvinists). On the other hand, if we (Baptists) are defining the terms, what we look at are the DoG as we define them (TULIP). We have a common acceptance of the mode of baptism and of believer’s baptism. To us, “Calvinism and Reformed” do not include what traditionally incorporated in those terms. We can argue that paedobaptism is not unique to Calvinism and that we are emphasizing what is merely a Calvinistic distinctiveness applied within other Baptist or other like-minded circles. In other words, within our circles the debate is TULIP and not Reformed faith as a whole.

    The five points of Calvinism may be a codification of many Baptist’s doctrine, but it was never a codification of Reformed belief - it was a defense against the five Articles which focused on one aspect of Reformed belief. So…again…I guess it depends on who you are speaking with. Perhaps it is best to just say what you believe without quickly applying labels which may or may not be understood by a particular audience (or at least, know your audience).
     

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