Can you tell me versions?

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Phillip, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Phillip

    Phillip
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    I have two King James Bibles that I am interested in knowing more about. If I could get some help from some of you scholars.

    The first is relatively new (compared to what I consider old). The bottom of the front page has the statement: "Buffalo: Published by Phinney & Co. 1850"

    It has an introduction called: "To the Reader." and below that [from Collins' Bible] What does this mean? Then that heading is followed by what is apparently the standard KJ introduction.

    It has several woodcut pictures in it.

    Both have brown hardcover binding.

    The second one a little older, but in a little better shape is:
    "Philadelphia: Printed and Published by M. Carey, No. 121, Chestnut Street
    1817"

    Both have the same title on the title page:

    The HOLY BIBLE containing the Old and New Testaments, together with the Apocrypha: translated out of the original tongues, etc.

    This one has Tables of Scripture weights, measures and coins and John Brown's concordance
    Embellished with seventy maps and historical Engravings.

    On the inside of the cover is a name plate The Property of Mary Brown Bought April 15th 1818 Price $12,,50 cts. The name plate is written with a quill pin except for the "Mary Brown" which appears to be printed.


    Can anybody shed any light on the actual versions I have here or anything else concerning these Bibles? It is interesting that they contain the Apocrypha, but do NOT have them listed the way the Catholic Bibles are. They are kept seperate between the ot and nt. Who would be (or what denomination or group) using these types of Bibles. They are in excellent shape considering the age. These are not the little teacher's Bibles that were printed by the dozens. These are about 9 inches by 11 inches and about 4" thick. Fairly large print, easy to read.
     
  2. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    Wow! Would love to see them.

    Can't help with the particulars, but the one sure was expensive - $12.50 in 1818 was A LOT of money. I think labourers earned about $1 a week at that time!
     
  3. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    Every Protestant or English Catholic Bible that contained the apocrypha put it between the testaments (since 1&2 Maccabees are the largest of the books and belong chronologically there).

    Latin Catholic Bibles blend in the books within the Old Testament, even adding one to make Daniel longer.
     
  4. mioque

    mioque
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    Don't forget adding material to Esther to make that one longer as well.
     
  5. Phillip

    Phillip
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    Well, I can't really tell if it is actually $12.50. It says this, exactly: "$12,,50 cts"

    It is a hardback, large book, which I assume would have been expensive back then, but I'm not really sure if that price means exactly $12.50, if you see what I mean?

    They are beautiful books, but they are very fragile. They are well preserved, though. I have a German 18th century that I think is a Martin Luther Bible because it has the words Martin Luther in large print on the Title page. The title page is printed in both red and black ink. Someone drew a pencil drawn clipper ship on the blank page on the inside of the cover. It is faded, but easy to see. This book is even more fragile, but it is a much better treasure than the other two. It is larger and contains many great woodcuts. Plus it is at least 50 years older. I cannot remember the exact year, I will post it tomorrow. I believe it was around 1760 or 1770. I also have a 1612 KJV, but it has much missing and is not in good shape at all.

    It is sad, many people have been taking these old Bibles and tearing pages from them because they can sell each page for twenty or thirty dollars compared to a fixed amount for the whole Bible. Many good Bibles are being destroyed by this. Go to ebay and look do a search for old Bible pages. It will amaze you. Sad......
     
  6. Craigbythesea

    Craigbythesea
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    Hopefully the pages that are being sold are being removed from Bibles whose overall condition is very poor with some pages very badly damaged or entirely missing.
     
  7. Craigbythesea

    Craigbythesea
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    If any of you would like an old Bible and have between $3,000 and $2,000,000 to spend on one, here is a good web site:

    http://www.greatsite.com/ancient-rare-bibles-books/index.html

    "For less than the cost of a good plasma television set, you could have one of these ancient treasures of Christian history in your home."
     

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