Check if NSA warrantless surveillance is looking at your IP traffic

Discussion in 'Politics' started by poncho, Jul 2, 2006.

  1. poncho

    poncho
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    AT&T technician Mark Klein learned of a secret room installed in the company's San Francisco internet switching center ... what he saw and learnt prompted him to call at the Electronic Frontier Foundation unannounced in late January 2005 with documents in hand. The EFF was already preparing a class-action lawsuit against AT&T for allegedly turning over customer phone-record data to the NSA -- relying on reporting from the Los Angeles Times about AT&T giving the NSA access to a phone-record database with 1.88 trillion entries. More here at Wired.

    Now a heavily redacted 40 page document document by internet expert J. Scott Marcus has been supplied and is available here. PDF Alert !! 40 pages.

    Briefly Marcus says, based on the Klein documents, his experience, knowledge of AT&T and understanding of what equipment is available that ..

    The AT&T documents that Klein supplied are genuine.

    There could be 35 - 40 such rooms throughout the US.

    The internet surveillance program covers domestic traffic not only just international traffic.Most International traffic enters the US through only 3 points Florida New York and San Francisco. Marcus notes that the AT&T spy rooms are "in far more locations than would be required to catch the majority of international traffic"

    The system is capable of looking at content, not just addresses. The configuration described in the Klein documents -- presumably the Narus software in particular -- "exists primarily to conduct sophisticated rule-based analysis of content", Marcus concludes.

    The system looks at all traffic not just AT&T but those transiting AT&T networks.

    Want to check to see of your Internet packets are being "sniffed" by AT&T.

    First. A little history.

    Continue.
     
  2. emeraldctyangel

    emeraldctyangel
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    Learnt? Is that really a word?

    Second, who cares if the government knows I ordered pizza twice this week or shopped for shoes on the internet? Im glad they are monitoring Yahoo chat rooms - there are some people in there with issues that need to be watched.

    AT&T can sniff all they want. They will be rather bored with my records though.
     
  3. poncho

    poncho
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    Have you got one of these yet? Your bosses all got theirs. :smilewinkgrin:
     
  4. LadyEagle

    LadyEagle
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    I don't care who sniffs at who I call or the IP addresses. They would be bored to tears.

    Hey, but look at it this way - maybe there will be some new recruits for the Baptist Board since this IP shows up quite often. :)
     
  5. ASLANSPAL

    ASLANSPAL
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    The way back machine


    pokeing fun at this inane statement

    Emeraldcity discovers a time machine and goes back....way back!

    :tongue3:


    [​IMG] Hey Joe! its me I discovered a time machine tried to order two pizzas here in Moscow but I quess you knew that! Hey what happened to the Mc donalds near the KGB ..oh thats right its 1953.:tongue3:

    emerald do you really mean what you say? or are you just frustrated the trains do not run on time.
     
    #5 ASLANSPAL, Jul 2, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2006
  6. poncho

    poncho
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    Who cares, who needs to be protected by the fourth amendment anyways? Not us because we're not doing anything wrong.
     
  7. El_Guero

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    Emerald,

    Welllll I guess we know who his heros are.

    God bless


     
  8. poncho

    poncho
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    Well APAL I guess we know how serious those folks were when they swore to defend the fourth amendment from all enemies foreign and domestic. It almost looks as though they're more interested in defending the government's rights than the people's.
     
    #8 poncho, Jul 2, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2006
  9. Dale-c

    Dale-c
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    If we only knew all that went on.....we would be appalled.
     
  10. poncho

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    My guess is that 90% would still deny it.
     
  11. poncho

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    Spy Agency Sought U.S. Call Records Before 9/11, Lawyers Say

    June 30 (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. National Security Agency asked AT&T Inc. to help it set up a domestic call monitoring site seven months before the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, lawyers claimed June 23 in court papers filed in New York federal court.


    The allegation is part of a court filing adding AT&T, the nation's largest telephone company, as a defendant in a breach of privacy case filed earlier this month on behalf of Verizon Communications Inc. and BellSouth Corp. customers. The suit alleges that the three carriers, the NSA and President George W. Bush violated the Telecommunications Act of 1934 and the U.S. Constitution, and seeks money damages.


    ``The Bush Administration asserted this became necessary after 9/11,'' plaintiff's lawyer Carl Mayer said in a telephone interview. ``This undermines that assertion.''


    The lawsuit is related to an alleged NSA program to record and store data on calls placed by subscribers. More than 30 suits have been filed over claims that the carriers, the three biggest U.S. telephone companies, violated the privacy rights of their customers by cooperating with the NSA in an effort to track alleged terrorists.


    ``The U.S. Department of Justice has stated that AT&T may neither confirm nor deny AT&T's participation in the alleged NSA program because doing so would cause `exceptionally grave harm to national security' and would violate both civil and criminal statutes,'' AT&T spokesman Dave Pacholczyk said in an e-mail.
    U.S. Department of Justice spokesman Charles Miller and NSA spokesman Don Weber declined to comment.


    Continue.
     
  12. El_Guero

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    This reads like we SHOULD HAVE HAD domestic spying to prevent 9-11-2001.

    Shoulda, woulda, coulda - but we did not have it.


     
  13. poncho

    poncho
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    You can say this with 100% certainty? How? Sources, links?

    Page 14 (pdf)



    he National Security Agency advised President Bush in early 2001 that it had been eavesdropping on Americans during the course of its work monitoring suspected terrorists and foreigners believed to have ties to terrorist groups, according to a declassified document.


    The NSA’s vast data-mining activities began shortly after Bush was sworn in as president and the document contradicts his assertion that the 9/11 attacks prompted him to take the unprecedented step of signing a secret executive order authorizing the NSA to monitor a select number of American citizens thought to have ties to terrorist groups.


    In its "Transition 2001" report, the NSA said that the ever-changing world of global communication means that "American communication and targeted adversary communication will coexist."


    "Make no mistake, NSA can and will perform its missions consistent with the Fourth Amendment and all applicable laws," the document says.


    However, it adds that "senior leadership must understand that the NSA’s mission will demand a ‘powerful, permanent presence’ on global telecommunications networks that host both ‘protected’ communications of Americans and the communications of adversaries the agency wants to target."
    What had long been understood to be protocol in the event that the NSA spied on average Americans was that the agency would black out the identities of those individuals or immediately destroy the information.


    But according to people who worked at the NSA as encryption specialists during this time, that’s not what happened. On orders from Defense Department officials and President Bush, the agency kept a running list of the names of Americans in its system and made it readily available to a number of senior officials in the Bush administration, these sources said, which in essence meant the NSA was conducting a covert domestic surveillance operation in violation of the law.


    James Risen, author of the book State of War and credited with first breaking the story about the NSA’s domestic surveillance operations, said President Bush personally authorized a change in the agency’s long-standing policies shortly after he was sworn in in 2001.


    "The president personally and directly authorized new operations, like the NSA’s domestic surveillance program, that almost certainly would never have been approved under normal circumstances and that raised serious legal or political questions," Risen wrote in the book. "Because of the fevered climate created throughout the government by the president and his senior advisers, Bush sent signals of what he wanted done, without explicit presidential orders" and "the most ambitious got the message."


    The NSA’s domestic surveillance activities that began in early 2001 reached a boiling point shortly after 9/11, when senior administration officials and top intelligence officials asked the NSA to share that data with other intelligence officials who worked for the FBI and the CIA to hunt down terrorists that might be in the United States. However the NSA, on advice from its lawyers, destroyed the records, fearing the agency could be subjected to lawsuits by American citizens identified in the agency’s raw intelligence reports.



    SOURCE
     
  14. JFox1

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    Although I detest the idea of the government having our phone records and IP addresses, what can be done about it? AT & T and others sold us out and gave the government our records.
     
  15. El_Guero

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    Poncho

    Sources? What a comment. Maybe you should look over your shoulder say cheese and smile.

    The government and candid camera are always looking for those kodak moments.
     
  16. El_Guero

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    Just FYI, if any of what your 'source' says is true - there were several traitors. Treason during time of war . . . Execution used to be the sentence for that.
     
  17. Daisy

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    Sounds more like we did have it and that it didn't prevent it.
     
  18. poncho

    poncho
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    It wasn't a comment it was a question and you didn't answer it.
     

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