Choosing av KJV edition

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by Psalm 95, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. Psalm 95

    Psalm 95
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    Having Swedish as a mother tongue, the King James language has seemed difficult to understand, so I have used a Swedish language Bible as primary Bible and NIV and NKJV for study Bibles. But more and more I feel that I as a baptist should own a KJV Bible. I will use it for reference and when studying John Gill and Matthew Henry commentaries.

    So, I have decided to buy a KJV Bible in leather. But, I am a little confused there seems to be different revisions (1611, 1769 and perhaps more) and then there are different publishers. Which edition of the KJV Bible should I choose?
     
  2. robycop3

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    I have the Cambridge Edition, copyright & all, as I believe it's the most "authentic" KJV edition because it IS copyrighted. I have several others, including a repro AV 1611, which I believe is a terrific asset for any English-reading Bible student.
     
  3. kubel

    kubel
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    I'm using some small-publisher edition, I think it's Cambridge-based. I also recommend the 1611, but *not* for primary use.

    (edited for typo)
     
    #3 kubel, Mar 18, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 18, 2007
  4. EdSutton

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    Of course! After all, according to some, it is the only perfect versi....![​IMG]

    Nevermind!

    Ed
     
  5. kubel

    kubel
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    Typo on my part :tonofbricks:. I can't imagine having to use the 1611 exclusively- too much blackletterness. :)
     
    #5 kubel, Mar 18, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 18, 2007
  6. mesly

    mesly
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    For the most part, if you purchase a KJV it will either be a 1769 or an 1873 version. The main difference being that the 1873 version, done by Scrivner, has paragraph markings in the text that go through the end of the NT. The 1769 version did not have them completed.

    If you purchase a Cambridge or an Oxford KJV, you will most likely have the 1769 version. If you purchase the KJV Study Bible from Zondervan, it comes with the 1873 version. Most of the Scofield study bibles use the 1769 version. To add to the confusion, Oxford holds the 1762 copyright, but doesn't always use it in their editions (they tend to use the Cambridge 1769).

    Bottom line, don't worry too much about which edition you end up with - they are all the word of God and the differences between them are not noticeable.
     
  7. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    The editions of the KJV are bsacially meaningless. Despite the well intended efforts of some to point out differences the KJV is the KJV.

    Dont worry about which edition to buy.
     
  8. Mike Berzins

    Mike Berzins
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    You should get a King James Bible not because you are a Baptist, but because it is the word of God in English. It might seem difficult to you, but it will make your command of the English language much stronger.

    I've never seen a case where it mattered whether one was using a Cambridge or an Oxford King James Bible. But if you read I Timothy 3:16 in an NIV, you will find that Christ Jesus appeared in a body - which says nothing about his deity. In the King James you will see that "God was manifest in the flesh" - proving the deity of Christ.

    If you think it doesn't matter because the deity of Christ is supposed to be proved elsewhere in the NIV, I urge you to (prayerfully) think again.

    The differences become apparent when one wields the sword of the spirit. While contending for the faith against Russelites and Mormons on the one hand, and "Oneness Pentecostals" on the other hand, you will find that the King James Bible is the only single book (in English) that you can use to counter all false doctrines about the nature of Christ - without subjectively appealing to dead languages or choosing which translation to use depending on which cult you are contending with.

    I challenge anyone on this board to prove that the above difference regarding the deity of the Lord Jesus Christ is "meaningless" or "not noticeable".
     
  9. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    In your haste to defend you view you clearly misunderstood.

    Read my post again - it doesn't matter which edition of the KJV one uses - the KJV is the KJV.
     
  10. mesly

    mesly
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    I will ditto Roger's message to you Mike, since you did quote part of my message in yours. If you go back and read mine, you will notice that the entire message is about the KJV, not any other translation.
     
  11. Mike Berzins

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    Sorry, I didn't misunderstand you. My last part could have just been a little more clear. The point I was trying to raise is that unlike the editions of the KJB, the differences between the KJB and and the NIV are not meaningless. I see that you both think the KJV differences are not important. But do you think the same away about the difference I pointed out previously about I Timothyy 3:16?
     
  12. Ed Edwards

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    Mike Berzins: //But if you read I Timothy 3:16 in an NIV,
    you will find that Christ Jesus appeared
    in a body - which says nothing about his deity.
    In the King James you will see that
    "God was manifest in the flesh" - proving the deity of Christ.//

    If Christ Jesus was part of the 'mystery of godliness'
    and he appeared in a (human) body then He must
    have been the deity. I don't see where your rabbit
    division (hare splitting, hair splitting) is useful in
    any way.

    1 Timothy 3:16 (NIV):
    Beyond all question,
    the mystery of godliness is great:
    He appeared in a body,
    was vindicated by the Spirit,
    was seen by angels,
    was preached among the nations,
    was believed on in the world,
    was taken up in glory.

    1 Timothy 3:16 (KJV1611 Edition):
    And without controuersie,
    great is the mysterie of godlinesse:
    God was manifest in the flesh,
    iustified in the Spirit,
    seene of Angels,
    preached vnto the Gentiles,
    beleeued on in the world,
    receiued vp into glory.
     
  13. Mike Berzins

    Mike Berzins
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    Speaking as a fool:

    "Godliness is something we are all called to, brother. Check out all the verse on godliness. The mystery of godliness is something we can eventually achieve just like Jeus did. He was created once, but now has become a god. We can become like him and have our own earth to rule over as well. The verse doesn't say Jesus is God; it's just describing the mystery of his godliness." (end of speaking as a fool).

    So prove to me how exactly Jesus being part of the "mystery of godliness" necessarily means he was God manifest in the flesh? Especially since as far as I can tell, every time the word "godliness" is used in the NIV, it refers to the characteristic of a man?

    Do you ever contend for the faith against someone who denies the deity of Christ? What verses have you used in that battle?
     
  14. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    That's not the topic of this thread.

    Let's stay on topic here, which is differences in the KJV editions only
     
  15. Psalm 95

    Psalm 95
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    Thanks for you advice. I understand that I do not have to worry about editions of the KJV.

    I just ordered a Cambridge KJV Concord Wide Margin. I hope it will last a long time, and I think it nice to have some space for notes, for exampal notes explaining difficult words and notes on the differences between KJV and NIV and Folkbibeln.
     
  16. av1611jim

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    The Cambridge Wide margin is the one I preach from and is my primary Bible. I like the wide margins so I can make notes when listening to a message in church or just when I am doing my own reading. The one I purchased has lots of other helps in it but the feature I think I like best (besids the text itself!) is the last several pages are blank ruled pages like in a notebook. It is there that I can write an outline while listening to a good message or develope my own. In this way I am able to always be prepared to preach when called upon unexpectedly. I always have outlines to "spring from" and I don't have to pack around an additional notebook.

    God bless brother!

    In His service;
    Jim
     
  17. Ed Edwards

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    Amen, Brother Av1611jim -- Preach it!

    Good choice -- Amen! even.
    Is it available in the jumbo print?

    My pastor preaches from a NASB (New American Standard Bible)
    but will give the KJV reading stored in his head for difficult words.

    Is the old Folkbibeln better than the Bibln 2000?
    (for those who don't use Wikipedia these are Swedish
    translations).
     
  18. Psalm 95

    Psalm 95
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  19. webdog

    webdog
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    You could get a...
    NKJV
    KJV2000
    MKJV
    I like all three.
     
  20. Logos1560

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    There are several present editions of the KJV in print including at least three different Cambridge KJV editions, more than one Oxford KJV edition, the KJV edition printed by the American Bible Society, and others.

    The 1873 Cambride KJV edition that is the present KJV edition printed by Zondervan has "strain out" at Matthew 23:24 instead of "strain at." It has "profession of our hope" at Hebrews 10:23 instead of "profession of our faith." At John 10:25, this 1873 edition has "ye believe not" in agreement with several of the earlier English Bibles while most present KJV's have "ye believed not." At Acts 25:23, it has "were entered" in agreement with several earlier English Bibles while most KJV's have "was entered" following the Bishops' Bible. This 1873 edition has "thy mercy's sake" (Psalm 6:4, 31:16, 44:26) for the Oxford edition's "thy mercies' sake," “fathers‘ house“ for “father‘s house“ (1 Chron. 7:2, Ezra 2:59, Neh. 7:61), “heart’s lust” for “hearts’ lust” (Ps. 81:12), “Adder‘s poison“ for “adders‘ poison“ (Ps. 140:3), “fools‘ back” for “fool‘s back“ (Prov. 26:3), “merchant’s ships” for “merchants’ ships” (Prov. 31:14), “priests‘” for “priest’s” (Ezek. 44:30), “potter’s clay” for “potters’ clay” (Dan. 2:41), and “oaths’ sake” for “oath’s sake” (Matt. 14:9, Mark 6:26). It has “mine hands” for “my hands” (Isa. 65:2) and “mine hand” for “my hand” (Jer. 25:15, Ezek. 6:14). It has “thine hand” for “thy hand” (Isa. 64:8).

    The text of this KJV edition is more in agreement with the 1611 edition than are most other present KJV editions. Scrivener presented a list of the places in his 1873 edition that he restored 1611 readings (Authorized Edition, pp. 215-237). The Old Testament of this edition has “you“ for “ye“ (Gen. 9:4), “Girgashite“ for “Girgasite“ (Gen. 10:16), “towards“ for “toward“ (Gen. 15:5), “this thing“ for “this thing also“ (Gen. 19:21), “lift“ for “lifted“ (Gen. 22:4), “amongst“ for “among“ (Gen. 23:10), “to him“ for “unto him“ (Gen. 25:33), “Philistims“ for “Philistines“ (Gen. 26:1), "hand” for “hands” (Gen. 39:1), “spirit” for “Spirit” (Gen. 41:38), “drunk“ for “drank“ (Gen. 43:34), “any man” for “any men” (Gen. 47:6), “Haste you“ for “Haste ye“ (Gen. 45:9), “And you“ for “And ye“ (Gen. 45:13), “you did“ for “ye did“ (Exod. 10:11), “consecrations“ for “consecration“ (Exod. 29:26), “clothes“ for “cloths“ (Exod. 31:10), “stript“ for “stripped“ (Exod. 33:6), “manner fat“ for “manner of fat“ (Lev. 7:23), “nor scales“ for “and scales“ (Lev. 11:10), “were“ for “are“ (Lev. 25:23), “river side“ for “river‘s side“ (Num. 24:6), “begun“ for “began“ (Num. 25:1), “thy hand“ for “thine hand“ (Deut. 2:24), “thy heart“ for “thine heart“ (Deut. 15:7), “thy oil“ for “thine oil“ (Deut. 18:4), “all lost thing“ for “all lost things“ (Deut. 22:3), “noondays“ for “noonday“ (Deut. 28:29), “even the Lord” for “of the Lord” (Josh. 3:11), “or Sheba“ for “and Sheba“ (Josh. 19:2), “spirit” for “Spirit” (Jud. 3:10), “a hammer“ for “an hammer“ (Jud. 4:21), “he went” for “she went” (Ruth 3:15), “girt“ for “girded“ (1 Sam. 2:4), “my heart“ for “mine heart“ (1 Sam. 2:35), “in the fields” for “in the field” (1 Sam. 20:5), “wrapt“ for “wrapped“ (1 Sam. 21:9), “rose“ for “arose“ (1 Sam. 24:8), “a hill“ for “an hill“ (1 Sam. 26:13), “thy word“ for “thy words“ (1 Kings 3:12), “the LORD“ for “the Lord“ (1 Kings 8:56), “flotes“ for “floats“ (1 Kings 5:9), “son” for “sons” (1 Kings 13:11), “leese“ for “lose“ (1 Kings 18:5), “a horse “ for “an horse“ (1 Kings 20:20), “neesed“ for “sneezed“ (2 Kings 4:35), “kab“ for “cab“ (2 Kings 6:25), “to give to him“ for “to give him“ (2 Kings 8:19), “Geshan“ for “Gesham“ (1 Chron. 2:47), “Shimron“ for “Shimrom“ (1 Chron. 7:2), “men of might” for “valiant men of might” (1 Chron. 7:5), “son“ for “sons“ (1 Chron. 7:35), “Michah“ for “Micah“ (1 Chron. 23:20), “and laid” for “and they laid” (2 Chron. 29:23), “sin“ for “sins“ (2 Chron. 33:19), “and gold” for “and the gold” (Ezra 7:18), “built“ for “builded“ (Neh. 3:10, “cruddled“ for “curdled“ (Job 10:10), “sent“ for “scent“ (Job 14:9), “flying” for “fleeing” (Job 30:3), “the LORD“ for “the Lord“ (Ps. 2:4), “whiles” for “while” (Ps. 49:18), “holy Spirit“ for “holy spirit“ (Ps. 51:11), “Zion“ for “Sion“ (Ps. 65:1), “stablish“ for “establish“ (Ps. 89:4), “snare” for “snares” (Ps. 141:9), “vapour” for “vapors” (Ps. 148:8), “beareth“ for “bear“ (Song of Solomon 4:2), “mixt“ for “mixed“ (Isa. 1:22), “Get you” for “Get you” (Isa. 30:11), “burnt“ for “burned“ (Jer. 1:16), “nor daughters” for “or daughters” (Jer. 16:2), “sith“ for “since“ (Jer. 23:38), “afterwards” for “afterward” (Jer. 34:11), “word which“ for “word that“ (Jer. 40:1), “utter court” for “outer court” (Ezek. 10:5), “cropt“ for “cropped“ (Ezek. 17:4), “And the word” for “The word” (Ezek. 18:1), “ebeny“ for “ebony“ (Ezek. 27:15), “astrologians“ for “astrologers“ (Dan. 2:27), “a whirlwind” for “the whirlwind” (Hos. 13:3), “ript“ for “ripped“ (Hos. 13:16), “Kerioth“ for “Kirioth“ (Amos 2:2), “flieth” for “fleeth” (Nah. 3:16), and “Lord GOD“ for “LORD God“ (Hab. 3:19).

    In the New Testament, this 1873 and present KJV edition has “but will” for “but he will” (Matt. 3:12), “Spirit“ for “spirit“ (Matt. 4:1), “a hungred“ for “an hungred“ (Matt. 4:2), “out the devils“ for “out devils“ (Matt. 9:34), “Is this“ for “Is not this“ (Matt. 12:23), “had not root” for “had no root” (Matt. 13:6), “a hymn“ for “an hymn“ (Matt. 26:30), “ought“ for “owed“ (Luke 7:41), “he said“ for “he had said“ (Luke 8:8), “to my Lord“ for “unto my Lord“ (Luke 20:42), “They say” for “They said” (John 11:34), “Canaan“ for “Chanaan“ (Acts 7:11, 13:19), “house“ for “housetop“ (Acts 10:9), “law of the husband“ for “law of her husband“ (Rom. 7:2), “approved to death” for “appointed to death” (1 Cor. 4:9), “hand“ for “hands“ (2 Cor. 5:1), “think you“ for “think ye“ (2 Cor. 12:19), “passed“ for “past“ (Eph. 2:11), “shamefastness” for “shamefacedness” (1 Tim. 2:9), “or by our epistle“ for “or our epistle“ (1 Thess. 2:15), “which doeth“ for “that doeth“ (1 John 2:29), “precious stone” for “precious stones” (Rev. 17:4), “sailers“ for “sailors“ (Rev. 18:17), “dipt” for “dipped” (Rev. 19:13), and several others.

     

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