Christian College Jobs

Discussion in 'Baptist Colleges / Seminaries' started by Martin, Nov 1, 2008.

  1. Martin

    Martin
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    Are there Christian Colleges that hire full-time instructors who only have MA degrees? If so, where do I find such schools? Is there a website that collects that information for job seekers?

    Thanks
    Martin.
     
  2. exscentric

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    Depends on what you would want to teach, but I'm sure some liberal arts schools could use someone with a Masters. Also smaller Bible Colleges/institutes would I'd guess.

    As to a clearing house for such I've never heard of anything like that. Area associations might or might have an idea of schools needing people.

    Last time I was looking (15 or so ago) there seemed to be a huge glut of people wanting to get into teaching.
     
  3. Rhetorician

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    Martin Response

    Hey Martin,

    Io hope all is well with you.

    I for one have "under-degreed" and "wrong-degreed." It is not exactly the same as you are talking about but there are enough similarities for me to offer my humble opinion based on nearly 30 years in Gospel ministry and the teaching ministry. There are a lot of variables:

    1. The need of an RA PhD. ( I Know that this is not related to your question. But I know you know the importance of the terminal degree!).

    2. Being at the right place at the right time.

    3. Having and using a "network" of friends.

    4. Doing something/being something experientially that happens to set you apart, maybe like having one Master's in Religion and another in History. (I think that is your discipline? Yes?).

    5. Being willing to do any menial job to gain an entrance into the academe.

    6. Going to the professional conferences to network.

    7. Write! Write! Write! The sooner the better. The more the better!

    8. Submit papers to peer review journals, as many as possible.

    9. Keeping some writing project going all the time.

    10. Make writing an integral part of your life just like prayer or Bible reading.

    11. Persevere! at all costs!

    12. Writing is so intrinsically linked to teaching that you cannot imagine until you begin to do so.

    The bottom line with where I have been is that even if you have the terminal PhD there is no guarantee that anyone can get a position. One of the truths of the matter is that the markets, all markets related to or cognate with religion, are flush with PhDs. That is why the above suggestions are so very important.

    I have found out that once you get a major volume published it will mean about as much as another degree. I have had at least two other major writing projects develop since and out of the Broadus project that was published in August of this year.

    I know you have heard all of this before in some form or another here on the BB. I know the tone of what I have said may be depressing. But, and this is a "big but," if you know it is God's will for you to teach, even a subject like history--go for it!!

    May God's blessings abide on you as you seek His will in this matter!

    "That is all!"
     
  4. Dr. Bob

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    An MA may get you an entry-level teaching post (as instructor/adjunct) but as you know it is NOT what schools are looking for.

    So step one - get into an accredited grad program in your field with an EdD or PhD outcome. It may take DECADES but academic types in a college are not only impress with who you are and what you've done, but what you ARE DOING.

    So my DMin (which is NOT a teaching doctorate) looked okay on my resume, but when I added PhD in Progress . . . THAT was a deal maker.

    12 years now since that day, but hey "in progress" is still valid (even though it looks like I'll never finish!!)
     
  5. Martin

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    ==Adjunct jobs in history and religion are a dime a dozen. The only hard part was finding one close enough to justify the low pay. Once in the door the road is generally easy.


    ==This is true. I have debated with myself about a PhD or EdD for a while now and I am still not sure. I would love to earn a PhD in History but there are no realistic programs in my area. Around here the only PhDs in History are UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University, or a school like that. I suppose UNC-Greensboro would be a choice. I just have to think more about that.
     
  6. Martin

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    No PhD For Me

    ==I don't see myself pursuing a PhD in any field. There are several reasons for this and I do invite comments on this...

    1. The GRE is a major barrier. My math skills are too weak and it would take too long for me to "brush up".

    2. Having just finished writing my major research project (for my second MA) I am not in the mood to write a dissertation. A 45-page research project based on primary sources drained me.

    3. I enjoy teaching at the community college level. There is not a publish or perish atmosphere at most community colleges, instructors do more teaching than office work, and I find it very rewarding teaching adults who want to learn. I don't need a PhD to do what I am doing.

    4. I will probably need to get 18 graduate hrs in political science. Our political science/gov't instructor is retired but still teaches three classes per semester. If I stay at my current school, most likely I will be the one who will have to step in. However if I have to re-locate for a new position having history, religion, and political science under my belt makes me more marketable. I don't understand why, but most community colleges love people who can teach multiple subjects.

    5. No local schools offer a PhD in History. There are several MA programs in driving distance but not PhDs.

    For those reasons I just don't see myself entering the world of the PhD scholars. Once I can move from adjunct to permanent I will be right where I want to be and right where I believe God wants me. Lord willing that change should happen in the next year or so (depending upon the economy).

    Well, there you go.

    PS...

    I do ask everyone who is willing to pray for me concerning the job situation. I love being an adjuct because it does not require being active in faculty senate (etc). However our college needs another full-time History instructor. There has always been two and when I was hired it was assumed that after a short period of time I would be hired to be full-time. However when the economy took a nose dive the second history position froze. This has caused a strain on the department because it has always had two full-time instructors. There simply are not enough people to teach the classes. This has put my plans on hold because I simply don't know how long it will be before the position will be thawed. The administration hopes July, but the state budget looks like it might not be any better next fiscal year.
     
    #6 Martin, Nov 15, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 15, 2008
  7. PatsFan

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    I'll certainly pray for you, Martin. Would you ever consider a Ph.D in church history from the University of Pretoria, SA? Roscoe from www.degreediscussion.com had a positive experience there.

    Tom
     
  8. Martin

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    ==Hi Tom!

    I've pretty much ruled out doing PhD work. I will not say that I will never do a PhD. However I can say it is no longer in my plans. I'm happy and fulfilled at the community college level and have no desire to move to the university level. Also community colleges generally do not pay more for PhDs.

    Thanks for your comments.
     
  9. preachinjesus

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    You will be hard pressed to find academic work in this century with only a MA...unless that MA is from a top tier school and you have incriminating photos of someone important.

    Honestly, with the proliferation of doctoral degrees and the movement of higher education away from an MA being the standard degree a terminal degree is the first mark of consideration for full time faculty. Most of the job opportunities I see (not that I'm applying for...I don't like full time academics that much) one of the starting requirements is a PhD in that particular topic.

    You might be able to find some smaller colleges and Christian liberal arts universities that are hiring but you've got a disadvantage. The one silver bullet could be your publishing record. If you've got a winner more schools will be very interested.

    As for sites I would recommend finding every Christian college and university, looking them up, and finding their faculty/HR page. Most of them have them and are happy to post. Also, maybe use that student status when you can and join a bunch of societies to get their "white pages" of open positions.

    Not being disheartening, I hope, just honest. You have my prayers.
     
  10. Martin

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    ==Thanks. I already teach and religion for small a community college here in North Carolina and I am as happy as a frog in a pond. The North Carolina Community College System does not require PhDs or EdDs and does not generally give pay raises to those who have those advanced degrees.


    ==The proliferation of MA and PhDs in the fields of history and religion is a big problem for those new graduates. Add to that the bad economic situation being faced by all schools. It is certainly not a particularly good time to be looking at higher education as a career mainly in the humanities/social sciences.

    The thought of teaching at a Christian college was a nice one. However the reality of things set in. I have no desire to return to school yet again ( 2 MAs are enough) and I am happy where I am at. The Lord literally put the job I now hold in my lap. It was almost a situation where all I had to do was not blow the interview. Thankfully it all went well and things have been great since. Things have clearly changed since my 11-01-2008 and 11-15-2008 posts. I have certainly experienced the faithfulness of the Lord. He has been too good to me.
     

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