Christian Worship

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by NetChaplain, Aug 9, 2014.

  1. NetChaplain

    NetChaplain
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    The contrast and plan of God between the Jewish believer in the prior law-dispensation and the Christian believer in the present Gospel-dispensation is often mistakenly misunderstood. The difference between the two dispensations does not present an issue of conflicting interest, but is an issue concerning that of God’s chosen revelatory manner of reaching to mankind.

    The prior dispensation was limited to one nation of the world in order that His desires may be more clearly seen by being focused on a single people whose place in God was a representative analogy to the eventual redemption of those among the entire world.
    -NC

    Christian Worship​

    The liturgies of the church today invariably fall back upon the feelings of man, with a slight tincture of Gospel and a large infusion of law. There may be sublime language and glowing ideas, chiefly borrowed from the Old Testament, but in substance they are utterly beneath intelligent Christian use—far more Jewish than Christian.

    True worship is always according to revelation of the Word. What then could it be where salvation is not? The Jewish worship was set out in figures and shadows; it was a hope, not an actual relationship and possession (i.e. people of God through the Law of Moses instead of children of God through the Gospel of Christ—NC). The Jews were looking—and they were right in looking—for the Messiah, who would not only tell, but accomplish all things; He whom they were right in looking for was to be a Savior. The salvation that the Jews had before their eyes was still a thing in prospect, and not yet brought home to the heart as a present reality. While they waited for the Messiah, the worship was suited to their state. It was surrounded with priests and forms, which showed that the way was not made manifest into the Holiest (Heb 9:8).

    But and end came to this state of promise and provisional imagery. The veil was rent from top to bottom, when the Jews led the Gentiles to crucify their Messiah, God’s Son. Wonderful to say, in that crime of man, in the Cross, God wrought redemption; and man first stood in the presence of the Father, a Savior God. The whole Jewish system was at an end; it was dead if not yet buried, for God allowed a decent time for the funeral. But Judaism cast away life in rejecting the Messiah—Calvary proved that.

    When we come to search and understand the distinctive truths of the New Testament, we see the immense change in worship now connected with the accomplishment of the revelation of the Lord Jesus, His work, and the gift of the Holy Spirit. Hence from His rejection the Lord (as the Spirit afterward) was gradually unfolding, as the disciples could bear, the new order of things; for those accustomed to the old wine did not relish the new all at once. They frequented the temple at the hour of prayer, though they went to their houses to break bread. For a little while they were half Jews and half Christian—as are so many today.

    But God was about to lead them out finally, and the Epistles to the Hebrews cut the last cord which bound the Christian Jew to the old economy (dispensation). From that moment it was unfaithfulness to Christ, as He was now made known, to linger among the old things. In the same Epistle the Spirit instructs us in Christian worship as contrasted with the Levitical system. What do we find? The legal sacrifices superseded by that of the Lord Jesus, and the Jewish sanctuary, figure of the true into which the Lord Jesus is gone and we draw nigh in faith.

    The old sacrifices were always necessarily renewed (Heb 10:1); the Christian knows but one sacrifice, and the reason why is, that it was brought to perfection. Otherwise you only repeat and thereby give witness that you have nothing complete and perfect. But the essence of the sacrifice of the Lamb of God is that it is once offered (Heb 10:10), and by that one offering He has not merely sanctified (1 Cor 6:11; Heb 2:11), but perfected forever them that are sanctified (Heb 10:14).

    Nothing can be more distinctive than the doctrine of the Apostle Paul as to the offering of Christ for the Christian. He is looking not at passing circumstances, but at the essential difference between the Jewish worshiper and the Christian. The Jewish worshiper needed the constant succession of offerings to meet his wants; the Christian’s wants are already met on the Cross and in the Lord Jesus Christ Himself.

    - Wm Kelly

    http://www.abideabove.com/hungry-heart/
     
  2. Gerhard Ebersoehn

    Gerhard Ebersoehn
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    Please come to the mind-boggling 'point' you want to make .... or rather, brake, please. It clearly is disturbing your peace of mind

    PS

    It will enable me to proceed with copy-and-paste answers.
     
    #2 Gerhard Ebersoehn, Aug 13, 2014
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  3. NetChaplain

    NetChaplain
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    Hi GE - The article focuses on the differentiation of the worship God desires between the analogy of Christ's sacrifice, which involved the repetitious sacrifices required for the prior dispensation, and that of the different requirement of the present dispensation, which is a single occurrence in Christ's sacrifice.

    Forgiveness can no longer be provided for the worship-manner of the prior dispensation, because "He taketh away the first" (manner of worship in the Aaronic priesthood), "that He may establish the second" (manner of worship in Christ)--Heb 10:9.
     
    #3 NetChaplain, Aug 13, 2014
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  4. The Biblicist

    The Biblicist
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    There has been ONE and only ONE everlasting covenant of redemption (Heb. 13:20).

    The "old" versus the "new" are not different covenants OF REDEMPTION but different ADMINISTRATIONS of the same everlasting covenant.

    Prior to the "old" Covenant, Abraham was justified by faith in Christ in keeping with the "everlasting covenant." Indeed, from Genesis to Malichi there has only been ONE gospel, ONE way, ONE Savior and it is the same as Abraham's (Acts 10:43). All who have been saved from Genesis to Revelation are saved under the same everlasting covenant by the blood of Christ and justified by faith either looking forward or looking back.

    The "old" Covenant simply placed the emphasis on the holiness of God - His Law while still presenting the mercy of God through the pictures in the ordinances. The "old" Covenant was NEVER given for salvation but as a visible administration to TEACH the law in external visible administration in order to lead Israel away from self-righteousness and to the righteousness provided by Christ as seen pictorially in all their gospel ordinances/sacrifices.
     
  5. NetChaplain

    NetChaplain
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    It's my understanding there are two "Everlasting Covenants"; Israel's which has yet to occur (Jer 31:33 and Eze 36:27); and the present and eternal covenant in Christ.

    I believe the only reasoning that can be applied to separate these is to mistakenly consider Israel to be the Body of Christ, and that the above prophecies have already taken place when the Lord Jesus presented the Blood of His covenant.

    This intends that Israel has been without a covenant since "He taketh away the first (Mosaic Covenant), that He may establish the second (present covenant)--Heb 10:9.
     
    #5 NetChaplain, Aug 16, 2014
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  6. The Biblicist

    The Biblicist
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    This is simply wrong! You will notice that Jeremiah 31:33 is quoted by Hebrews as the "new" covenant"

    Jer. 31:33 But this shall be the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people.
    34 And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the LORD: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the LORD: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.

    Heb. 8:10 For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people:
    11 And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest.

    Heb. 10:16 This is the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them;
    17 And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more.


    As you can plainly see the covenant in Jeremiah, 31 and Ezekiel 36 is the "new" covenant in Hebrews 8 and 10. God does not have one way of salvation for the Jews and another way for the Gentiles. He had different administrations of this "blood of the everlasting covenant" (Heb. 13:20) but he does not have different covenants of salvation, as there is no salvation OUTSIDE of Christ and the ONLY covenant of salvation is the "everlasting" covenant made between the Father, Son and Holy Spirit before the world began.





    Just because Israel and individual elect from all nations are saved on the same basis (Acts 4:12), the same way (Jn. 14:6) by the same gospel (Heb. 4:2; Acts 10:43; 26:22-23) does not mean they are one and the same. Israel will be saved as a nation yet to come (Rom. 11:25-28) after God has called out all his people from among the Gentiles (Rom. 11:25).

    No! Israel simply had a previous visible administration of the very same covenant. However, the "old" covenant emphasized the holiness of the everlasting covenant "in Christ" - God's standard of holiness - the law - in order to manifest sin and turn them from self to faith in Christ. And individuals were turned to faith in Christ (Acts 10:43; Heb. 11). The "new" covenant administration emphasizes the fulfillment of that holiness in the person of Christ or the grace of the everlasting covenant in Christ. Both the "old" and "new" covenants are merely visible earthly administrations of the "everlasting covenant" upon earth. God is the author of both and God is not the author of confusion. The law administrative emphasis does not contradict the grace administrative emphasis, as both are found in the everlasting covenant and both are fulfilled in Christ alone.
     
    #6 The Biblicist, Aug 20, 2014
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  7. NetChaplain

    NetChaplain
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    TB - For now, I believe I can only speculate about that which concerns the prophecies of Israel, but I'm certain that they are inclusive only of the generality (majority) of Israel, which is not demonstrative of present-day Israel, wherein the majority of them will have the Spirit of God "put" in them and God will "cause you to walk in My statutes, and ye shall keep My judgments, and do them" (Eze 36:27). They have also yet to be "saved from all your uncleanness" (v 29), not to mention the remaining promises in this chapter.

    I agree with you that "Israel will be saved as a nation yet to come," which leaves this to occur during the Millennium. This is probably when "all Israel shall be saved." I believe when the phrase "all Israel shall be saved" is used, it is not in reference to just Christian Jews who are saved prior to Christ's next coming, which is His last coming, but also all unsaved Jews who are alive at His next coming--when they finally see Him and believe (Jhn 20:29). This is more than likely the prophecies Jer 31, Ezek 36, Heb 10 and 8, which all present the same event and chronology, and have yet to occur to the majority of Israel, which most are identified with the phrase "after those days" (days of the prior dispensation), which is indicative of the same event and chronology.

    My present reasoning for this concerns what Jesus said to Thomas when comparing believing without seeing to believing by seeing. This is the causative for my understanding that this may involve the last surviving Israelite population (which will probably at that time outnumber all prior Jewish populations) these prophecies may concern, for then only will they (unbelieving Israel) see Christ--then believe, and God will "put My Spirit in them."
     

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