Christmas Truce Centennary

Discussion in 'History Forum' started by shodan, Dec 8, 2014.

  1. shodan

    shodan
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  2. Melanie

    Melanie
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    It is a beautiful fragment from the WW1. The consequences of their action is less lovely, the brass not amused.

    What a stupid waste of a generation of young men it was. Whilst nursing I came across quite a number of old women who had lost their sweethearts in that war, and because of the tremendous loss of life, there were certainly not enough chaps to go around, so a lot of women never married......sad,sad, sad!
     
  3. shodan

    shodan
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    More blogs on the Christmas Truce of 1914

    I began a new website on the Christmas truce to accumulate various posts by other blogs on this 100th Anniversary. It begins with a reading from the first chapter of Oh Holy Night (the iconic story of Silent NIght in No Man's Land) and then re-blogs various posts that others have written on this 100th Anniversary.

    https://christmastruce1914.wordpress.com/
     
  4. shodan

    shodan
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    Over 10 million military men perished in that war. And even more people died in the great flu epidemic (1918) that was spread among men in close quarters transferred among countries by military deployments among other means.
     
  5. Melanie

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    Yes, Shodan...in a sense the epidemic was more awful, coming in on the heels of an exhausted people...then of course was the terrible Great Depression...my grandfather who served with the ANZAC copped a Turkish bullet in his right shoulder...he lost all function in that arm for the next 70 odd years, whilst waiting for evacuation on the beach, and the wounded were closely packed, his mate next to him was chatting away and the next grandad was wearing him !! Pop walked off his land in the Depression as he could not feed his family and although he could only use one arm got work as a light house keeper, virtually bed and board but the family was better off.

    A bit off the topic Shodan...but important at least to me.


    Have you read the biography of the Rev. William Doyle SJ.?
     

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