Classic TV-- MY THREE SONS

Discussion in 'Hobby/Travel Forum' started by Alcott, May 19, 2007.

  1. Alcott

    Alcott
    Expand Collapse
    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2002
    Messages:
    7,455
    Likes Received:
    93
    I have recently bought a DVD recorder and have begun recording my VCR tapes-- some of which are several years old now-- onto new DVD's, and one of the first I started with is My Three Sons,, the episodes in which Robbie meets and marries Katie; so I have been watching these eps, for the first time in a long time. It's interesting to note how much these shows-- not overtly Christian-- exemplify many of the values conservative Christians espouse today. There is no indication of premarital sex between the young couple, they wear "modest" clothes for the 1960's; and even though they are still in college, they live in the home of one of the families, preparing to establish their own home in the permanent, male-headed, conservative tradition with few complications.

    Briefly, as the Dougles family moves to California, they are put off at first by how "standoffish" the people seem to be, but then Robbie, a 20-year-old college student, meets Katie, a beautiful blonde coed, and they hit it off right away, chaging all their opinions of their new situation. Robbie is so taken by Katie, he surprises himself by asking her to marry him when they had known each other only a couple of weeks. He actually wants to renege on this, but can't bring himself to do it, even though he tries. Katie's girlfriends doubt that she knows what she is getting into, so they begin to snoop, and find out only that Robbie is not out to take advantage, but really loves her. Katie arranges a meeting of Robbie with her extended family (Katie's father had died, as had Robbie's mother), and even her cantankerous grandmother strongly approves of him. But then there are complications and distractions the day before the wedding, Robbie and Katie have a fight, and they announce they want to call the wedding off. Persuasion seems useless until Katie's grandmother gets in on it, and she demands to know if they love each other. They answer Yes, and that's all it takes to persuade them to forget their disagreement and all the tensions and trying to self-analyze, and they do get married, in spite of further complications.

    After they return from their honeymoon, they move into Robbie's old room at the Douglas family's house, and Katie has trouble adjusting, for it has been an all-male family for years. She cries a lot-- sometimes because she is happy, sometimes because she is sad-- and no one, including Robbie, understands that, except for the dad, Steve [Fred MacMurray]. Steve tries to explain to Robbie that he is alright; that new brides cry because of the extreme emotions they feel, and because they naturally have been taught an idealism about being married; that it's all supposed to be beautiful and perfect, and inevitably they find out it's not that way every minute of every day. Example dialog:

    Robbie comes down stairs after trying to console Katie
    Steve: Is everything alright, Rob?
    Robbie: I think so, Dad. [sighs] I really don't know what's wrong with me-- she must have cried 50 times today.
    Steve: Rob, there's nothing wrong with you-- but there are a few facts of life that you still have to learn.
    Robbie: Dad, I'm serious.
    Steve: So am I, Rob. Now, Katie didn't cry because of anything you did. She cried for 2 reasons-- first, she's a woman, and second, she's a bride.
    Robbie: Well, that doesn't make sense.
    Steve: And there's another fact for you-- alot of things women do don't necessarily make sense.
    Robbie: [sighs] Was my mother this way?
    Steve: Oh sure. I remember when we first got married, it was just like this. And I was just like you; I thought the whole thing was my fault.
    Robbie: Will it always be like this?
    Steve: No.. no, Rob, as time goes by, you'll find that you and Katie will become more alike than either of you ever thought possible.
    Robbie: [contemplates] Thanks, Dad. You make me feel alot better.
    Steve: Of course, Rob, you and Katie do have a special problem.
    Robbie: What's that?
    Steve: All of us living here together.
    Robbie: Yeah-- do you think we'll be able to work it out?
    Steve: Oh sure-- as long as everyone realizes everyone has to make adjustments... Katie has to learn to live in an all-male house, and we have to learn to live in a house that is no longer all-male.

    Then the scene switches to the next day as Uncle Charley, the flippant old sailor who takes care of the household chores, is humming and hanging out the wash. He takes the next article, and sees it is Katie's bra, and he hangs a sheet on the line between himself and where he is working to conceal it from the next-door-neighbors.

    Well, it's a "square" show, and young people today certainly wouldn't think much of it, but when I was a kid, it was a show I liked, and I've never stopped liking it. And admittedly, I wondered as a first and second grader what Robbie and Katie were really up to between them; why, when people get married, they share a room and a bed, which wasn't allowed before, and such things. All I knew was that Katie was pretty :laugh: . From a middle-aged adult's perspective, I like all this for different reasons.

    Anyway, does anyone else like this show? Was it too straight and clean?-- especially since they ignored the big 60's issues of race relations and the Vietnam War? Or was it a pleasant diversion to escape the harsh realities and focus on establishing the positives of life?
     
    #1 Alcott, May 19, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2007
  2. faithgirl46

    faithgirl46
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Messages:
    2,778
    Likes Received:
    2
    My Three Sons was a clean show that you could watch with your elders wothput worrying about the content of the show or the language. Sadly you cannot say that today.
    Faithgirl
     
  3. Salty

    Salty
    Expand Collapse
    20,000 Posts Club
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2003
    Messages:
    22,116
    Likes Received:
    220
    Just about all the show's were like that. The question is does TV coyp real life, or does real life copy TV?

    Also, there were strict censors on TV shows. For example, Two actors portray husband and wife (even if really married - eg Ricky & Lucy) were required to keep at least one foot on the floor if on the bed. Also, did you ever see a commode in the Beavers bathroom? Nope, was not allowed to be in the scene. and of course the list goes on.

    For the record, I woudl love to have the old shows like that again.

    Salty
     
  4. annsni

    annsni
    Expand Collapse
    Administrator
    Administrator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2006
    Messages:
    20,189
    Likes Received:
    372
    I LOVED My 3 Sons when I was young!! I wish it was still on TV because, I agree, it was a great show that was so safe. There's nothing like that on TV now. :(
     
  5. faithgirl46

    faithgirl46
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Messages:
    2,778
    Likes Received:
    2
    TV copies real life. Law and Order is a classic example.
    Faithgirl
     
  6. faithgirl46

    faithgirl46
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2005
    Messages:
    2,778
    Likes Received:
    2
    I know; tell me about it.
    Faithgirl
     
  7. Eric B

    Eric B
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2001
    Messages:
    4,806
    Likes Received:
    2
    It's a little bit of both. It's called "reciprocal causality". Some people want something, and then it is given to them. As it becomes morew popular, it then looks "cool" to others, who then demand more. And so on.
    And the word "pregnant" was not allowed. I think that one was going too far, and is what then led to the revolt where all taboos would be rebelled against and smashed, because many of the old mores were from unnatural hangups, even when something was in line with God's order (i.e., it was as if pregnancy was a bad thing even in marriage, which stems from old Church influence, particularly Augustine).
    Of course, it was "All in the Family" that began smashing that one, by deliberately having it flushed all the time, even though you didn't see it. (The point: even the most "conservative" family is still human just like the rest of us). I don't know when TV did begin showing it. Come to think of it; I cannot even think of any shows where it is shown (though I don't watch many modern shows). You largely see them in commercials and on modern cartoons.
     
  8. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
    Expand Collapse
    New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    3,517
    Likes Received:
    1
    Boy does this bring back the memories!

    If I'm not mistaken, didn't William Frawley (Fred Mertz on "I Love Lucy") play a similar role to Uncle Charley in the first couple seasons of "My Three Sons"?

    Yes, they did have some good shows back then compared to what they have on today. In fact, I can't really think of any current shows that I could recommend as truly decent for Christian (or other) folks.

    The cable channel TV Land does run a lot of the older shows, but even some of the ones that it does show from the 70's ("All in the Family" comes to mind) I don't particularily care for.

    This isn't to say that all the shows of the 50's and early 60's were perfect. Even then there were ones that I didn't care that much for. But at least there were some that were really entertaining.

    (NOTE-- Oh No! This is my 666th post!!!)
     

Share This Page

Loading...