College Students Divided ....

Discussion in 'News / Current Events' started by ktn4eg, Sep 27, 2013.

  1. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
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    Survey: College Students Divided on Spirituality

    (Bob Smietana, special for USA TODAY [Sept. 27, 2013])

    College students fall into three camps when it comes to faith, according to a study released Thursday.

    Some are true believers.
    Some are spiritual but not religious.
    And some couldn't care less.

    Researchers from Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., asked students nationwide a series of questions about their spiritual, political and moral values, ranging from belief in God and worship attendance to climate change and [email protected] marriage.

    They found the students fell into three distinct worldviews.

    About a third (32 percent) were religious, a third were spiritual (32 percent), and just under a third (28 percent) were secular. About 70 percent of the religious students were Christian as were 43 percent of the spiritual students.

    Most of the secular students, and about a third of the spiritual students were so-called "nones"---those with no religious identity, researchers said.

    A growing number fall into the "none" category. Researchers said that the nones show a "remarkable degree of indifference to religion."

    The online survey of 1,800 students was conducted in April and May.
     
  2. ktn4eg

    ktn4eg
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    More detail on above survey

    Here's a little more detail concerning the OP's survey:
    (source: same as OP)

    While very few Americans identify as atheists or agnostics, a growing number fall into the "none" category. Polling from the Pew Research Center found the number of "nones" among all Americans grew from about 15% in 2007 to just under 20% in 2012.

    The Trinity survey, conducted with the secular non-profit Center for Inquiry, was done in part to help understand the "none" group.

    Each group or brand of students in the survey had a distinct world view, researchers said.

    Religious students go to church, are more likely to believe in creationism or intelligent design and oppose assisted suicide, adoptions by [email protected] couples and gun control. Secular students do not believe in God, endorse evolution, accept assisted suicide as moral, say gay couples should be able to adopt and want more gun control.

    The spiritual students were split. They sided with the religious students on questions about God and with secular students on questions about politics and science.

    Students from all three groups were worried about global warming, including 96% of the secular students and 80% of the religious students.

    The findings "challenge the notion that the nones are just 'religiously unaffiliated' or religious searchers who have not yet found a religious home," researchers Barry Kosmin and Ariela Keysar wrote. "This survey clearly revealed that today's students with a secular worldview, who are mainly nones, are not traditional theists."

    Daniel Jansourzian, a junior at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, runs a start-up Pentecostal ministry at the school. He said many students grew up going to church but no longer attend. Being religious now, he said, is a conscious choice. His group runs four Bible studies and a weekly worship service.
     
  3. thisnumbersdisconnected

    thisnumbersdisconnected
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    These are essentially the same results Pew got in its annual polling of faith in America. Not too surprising, except for the fact that the student apathy level doesn't exceed by much the adult apathy level.
     

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