Critics question homemaking program

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by 2 Timothy2:1-4, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. 2 Timothy2:1-4

    2 Timothy2:1-4
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    FORT WORTH, Texas (BP)--A new undergraduate homemaking program at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary "is raising eyebrows among some Southern Baptists," according to an Associated Press article circulated nationally Aug. 10.......

    .......The homemaking program "is quite superfluous to the mission of theological education in Southern Baptist life," Cole wrote on a blog, according to the AP. "It's yet another example of the ridiculous and silly degree to which some Southern Baptists, Southwestern in particular, are trying to return to what they perceive to be biblical gender roles."


    http://www.bpnews.net/bpnews.asp?id=26236&ref=BPNews-RSSFeed0813
     
  2. Analgesic

    Analgesic
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    Ridiculous. Start a school of scrubbing and teach them to bake like a baptist and other fine skills if you wish. But that's practical training and does not belong at an scholarly institution.
     
  3. donnA

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    precieved biblical gender rolls. I don't object to a woman who works, but the bible is specific about who we are as women, and what our roll is to be.
     
  4. 2 Timothy2:1-4

    2 Timothy2:1-4
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    Are you suggesting that we do not teach practical training in our colleges and Seminaries? That would be incorrect.


    It always amazes me those who see what goes on in the home as having a lesser value and takes less scholarship than anything else.
     
  5. abcgrad94

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    Hmmm. Maybe parents just aren't teaching their daughters basic housekeeping skills while still at home, and that's why the school feels a need to teach them? It's a distinct posibility since so many moms are rarely home anymore. I'm not condemning moms who HAVE to work, it's just that we have so many choices nowadays, sometimes moms don't have time or make time to use, much less teach these important skills.
     
  6. abcgrad94

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    As a stay at home mom for 10 years, I have to disagree. I wish I could have learned so much more than I did, especially now that I'm a pastor's wife. There are so many great, practical ways we can minister God's love. Being smart and scholarly is wonderful, but it won't help my husband any if he comes home to a filthy house, cranky kids, and no dinner.

    I graduated from Bible college with a major in Bible. That degree helps me remember what scriptures to use when comforting someone, but it does nothing to help me host missionaries or cook funeral meals.

    In my opinion, I would have greatly benefited from more "practical" knowledge than scholastic instruction. Kudos to those who see the need for homemaker's training!
     
  7. ReformedBaptist

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    I have no problem with women working as long as its in the home, barefoot, and pregnant. :laugh:

    Here come the bricks...:tonofbricks:
     
  8. Salamander

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    The only thing that could be asserted as ridiculous in training at any institution in the area of homemaking is that if it were the norm for every young lady to be previously trained at home to perform to her best in this area.

    That is very sorrowfully not happening today as more and more women are seeking careers.

    It is good that some one has enough God about them to be concerned as to offer such training in homemaking at any level of education.

    So goes the home, so goes the church. It's no wonder so many churches are in the mess they're in, the homes that make it up are in a mess.
     
  9. Salamander

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    I have no problem with the woman working outside the home, just as long as she's barefoot and wanting to get pregnant when I get home!:sleeping_2:
     
  10. ReformedBaptist

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    Of course, my wife is on her way home now (stay at home mom, and homeschooler) with my 4 kids, is pregnant and walks aroudn the house barefoot mostly. lol
     
  11. 4boys4joys

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    The best education I have received in this area is the on the job kind. I understand some who say it would have been nice to have a class on helping with missionaries and the like. But I do not know if this kind of training can be taught in a class.

    I do not know how you would be able to teach all the variables that happen in minstry or in the home. It could give general help.But at the end of the day I believe it comes from, experience. If you do not know how to clean your home, have someone come over from the chrurch and show you. If you do not know how to cook you can get help there too. I can see where a class could help but the best way in my experience has been ON THE JOB.

    No one can train you for one kid is bleeding, one is on the potty waitng for you to help and one just spilled Apple Juice all over the floor.....while you are trying to do school. ( Dont' start putting down homeschool now. )

    Having practical training is not a bad idea, it is a good start. Just like any other class. You will learn more when it is practically applied. ( with a few mistakes too I may add). :laugh:
     
  12. dan e.

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    This is one of the dumbest things I've seen....of course to have this program is to insinuate the the Seminary has professional homemakers, with the qualifications to teach this.

    HAHA! This is so ridiculous! Here is an updated article in response to the new degree:

    [QUOTE/]
    SWBTS to offer additional degree
    For Immediate Release
    Fort Worth, Texas

    In a move to counter the mounting criticism that Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and its president, Paige Patterson, have received on account of the “homemaking degree,” offered through the seminary’s undergraduate program, the Fort Worth school has now authorized the development of a supplementary degree concentration in Christian Husbandry.

    The new degree, which will launch this fall, will further serve the school’s mission to equip Southern Baptist churches to reclaim the Christian home as a counter-cultural weapon against un-biblical family paradigms.

    With elective course offerings in lawnmowing, hedgetrimming, weedeating, and fire-ant prevention, Southwestern’s husbandry degree will achieve Patterson’s objective to make the seminary a premier center for theological education in America.

    “The Bible is replete with exhortations for men who seek to fulfill their God-given commission as the leaders of their households,” Patterson said. “Southwestern Seminary will spare no effort — we will spend every last dime of convention money, if necessary — to preserve and protect the biblical roles of Christian men.”

    The 23-hour concentration will require three hours of archery, sharpshooting, and gun safety complete with a taxidermy lab, four hours of marinade preparation and outdoor grilling, a seminar in automotive maintenance and repair, and a two hour course in corporal punishment techniques. Only male students will be allowed to enroll.

    Southwestern Seminary’s dean of husbandry studies, Rev. Dean Nichols, has high hopes for the program’s success.

    “We’re not going to tolerate Christian men who don’t know how to change a tire or baste a rack of ribs,” Nichols growled. “Southern Baptist churches will have confidence that preachers coming out of Southwestern Seminary can keep the church bus running, keep the baptistry pump working, and still prepare sermons for Sunday meeting.”[/QUOTE]
     
    #12 dan e., Aug 14, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 14, 2007
  13. dan e.

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  14. Debby in Philly

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    Interesting that it's called "husbandry."
    Or should it be "finishing school?"
     
  15. dan e.

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    My quotations may not have captured the sarcasm...that was also a post by Ben Cole, certainly not true, but poking a little fun at the new degree offered...which is hilarious, by the way.

    I'm sure everyone got that, just making sure so as not to start rumors that the degree is actually starting in husbandry!
     
  16. Analgesic

    Analgesic
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    I certainly do not feel that what goes on in the home has a lesser value -- indeed, the very opposite. But "scholarship" it does not take, nor should it. Yes, practical training exists in colleges and seminaries, but, when properly administered, it's methodological training for the teaching of others the same principles which have been discerned through years of careful study. How to sew, clean, bake, etc. have no scholarly theological component.

    I agree wholeheartedly. My point is not at all to denigrate the usefulness or importance of homemaking or suggest that the knowledge of such should not be a priority. Rather, I object to the idea that homemaking is a scholarly pursuit of study. By all means have a homemaking course, but it belongs more in the environment of a hands-on trade school than an academic setting.

    It is indeed a sad state of affairs that young women are not being brought up with the homemaking skills of previous generations, and it is good that a program in homemaking is being made available. I disagree with the location of the program, not the need for it.
     
  17. abcgrad94

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    Thanks for clarifying. I agree with it being more hands-on, like a shop class.

    4boys4joys--I agree, too with learning more while "on the job." But a class in practical home making sure can't hurt. Maybe they should have the young ladies come babysit and keep house for someone a few hours a day as part of their curriculum.:laugh: I'd be first in line to let them "borrow" my home and kids for on the job training!:laugh:
     
  18. Martin

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    The homemaking program is part of a larger academic program. It is only 23 hours out of a 129 hour degree program. To earn this degree students have to take classes in greek, latin, history, and theology along with their concentration (choose from: History of Ideas, Education, Homemaking, or Music). This hardly sounds like a BA in basket weaving. I think it is a great idea for women who, because their husbands work, may not be planning on holding a professional position but still want a college degree. Maybe they will never work a "job" outside of the home, maybe they will work part-time (etc), either way this degree is still a good option for those women.

    However, and this is a BIG however, the women who apply to this program must think long term. If something happens (husband dies, put out of work by sickness/injury, etc) and she needs to get a professional job, having a college concentration in "homemaking" is not going to take her far. For this reason women are probably better advised to take the education concentration.

    Having said that, I would not classify this program as silly. Any program that requires greek/latin/history is not silly.
     
  19. dan e.

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    All these things being said, you've got to admit that Cole's blog on the issue has to be a little funny, right?

    I mean I was laughing histarically....but even some of you other guys, didn't it bring a little chuckle?
     
  20. menageriekeeper

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    Okay, I've stopped laughing enough to post.

    First, Martin makes an excellent point that there are women who never intend to work outside the home who might enjoy a program such as this.

    Second, after the laughter settled a bit and I really thought things over, there are lots of young ladies (men too!) who really have no clue how to run a household. Me, myself and I was never taught how to properly clean or cook, beyond the very basics, for various reasons that don't bear going into. As a young wife, I would have loved to have learned how to organize my household so that I was running it instead of it running me. My husband, however, needed to take the course with me! His mother did practically everything for him and what she didn't do, simply didn't get done.

    I dislike this being an woman only class, but think it would be great if it were an equal opportunity class.

    No man should ever be in the position that he doesn't know where his own clothes are or how to match a shirt and pants because he's never been taught and either his mother or his wife has always done it for him. My FIL is just this bad off and so was his father. Poor DH, he even knows how to iron. :D :laugh:
     

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