Deep book reads

Discussion in 'Baptist Theology & Bible Study' started by evangelist6589, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. evangelist6589

    evangelist6589
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    There are those that think that I do not read deep. This is partially true, but not entirely as I do read some books that are deep.

    For an evangelism book I would say the book Tell The Truth is deep, and it is also used in many seminaries. I would not say that Puritan books are light as I am trying to get through Bunyan's book on Hell. I also read a little of a book called Ultimate Proof of Creation but was confused, so I will need to read slowly and perhaps more than once.

    I also have read this book called The Way of the Modern World once and found it very deep, but also very philosophical. Probably a book only a few can understand. Some here read books by DA Carson and NT Wright and they can be quite deep authors. I do not read NT Wright for obvious reasons, but Carson I would like to read, just have not gotten to him yet.

    I guess we are all at different levels in our readings. Like reading the gospels in the NT are easy compared to OT books like Ezekiel. How often do you hear in depth sermons, or read in depth commentaries on Ezekiel? Rarely.
     
    #1 evangelist6589, Sep 1, 2014
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  2. padredurand

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    Define deep, please.
     
  3. OldRegular

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    If you wish to read "deep" try the Bible. It is far deeper than any can go!
     
  4. Greektim

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    I agree... what is the criteria for determining depth? Typically, intended audience and length are my indicators of depth. Most books that Evan#### reads are by good guys who write on the popular level rather than for the scholastic level. Even if it is a "seminary textbook" doesn't make it scholarly either.
     
  5. JonC

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    I don't understand this part (perhaps it's too deep for my intellect). What exactly are the obvious reasons for not reading NT Wright...particularly when his scholarship and contributions are noted by people like Piper...who you seem to appreciate. Part of the problem is that you lean towards books to teach you truth...but only the "truth" that you want to believe. You would accept the eschatology Tim LaHaye or John MacArthur but reject a genuine exploration of eschatology. My conclusion (and please don't take offense, this is an opinion) is that you are looking for books to teach you what to believe rather than books from which to learn.
     
  6. Greektim

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    This is the 3rd time I've tried to post this... so appreciate it!!! ;)
    (It wouldn't let me post the links... not sure why)

    Let me illustrate what I mean with the discipline of Biblical theology (a burgeoning field)

    There are entry level lay books for the pew-sitter: Hamilton's What is Biblical Theology and Alexander's From Eden to New Jerusalem (though this one could be for the next one as well)

    There are undergrad or grad level intros: The Drama of Scripture or Understanding Biblical Theology by Klink and Lockett

    Then there are scholarly tomes written for experts or advanced studies: Child's Biblical Theology, Barr's The Concept of Biblical Theology, or The Ways of Our God: An Approach to Biblical Theology by Scobie

    If you notice, the length is similar in the first two categories. But the intended audience is different as well as how it might be used (in a classroom or not). The third is much longer and the audience is for experts or advanced students doing research in the field. Only the 3rd category is a truly "deep read". IMO anyhow.
     
  7. Deacon

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    some of my definition(s) of a deep book:
    1. a book that changes the way I think about something, therefore it requires me to think about what and why I believe something while I read it.
    2. (along the same lines) ….a book that clearly counters what I know believe in a convincing way.
    3. a book about a topic I've never encountered before or rarely think about.
    4. a book from a culture different from my own (e.g. Puritan works, Russian novels and works of ancient antiquity)
    5. books packed with information, where every sentence carries information and interspersed with a few illustrations.

    some definitions of an easy book:
    1. "beach reads" – a pleasure book that can be digested in a single sitting.
    2. a book that I've enjoyed a number of times before.
    3. just about any teen pre-novel (yeah, I still read some… Hunger Games books, Harry Potter series, Little House series)
    4. popular theology books – stuff you already know with lots of personal illustrations.

    provide some of your own definitions

    Rob
     
  8. Van

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    If you read "deep" books, you have an amazing intellect, and are a profound thinker.

    A deep book is a thick book with lots of footnotes.

    A simple fish story book of a few pages, like the Old Man and the Sea, is not a deep book, nothing to see here, move along.
     
  9. JonC

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    :applause:
     
  10. evangelist6589

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    So the books I just mentioned are at the popular level?
     
  11. evangelist6589

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    Well at least I read. How many christians read books these days? Most just read self-help, Heaven is For Real, The Purpose Driven Life, Your Best Life know, and or fiction like Twilight, and other such fiction type of books.
     
  12. evangelist6589

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    Not true. I read Ericksons book on eschatology and refer to it often and he is fair with all the views. Also I changed my view on alcohol due to hearing the arguments from people like Gentry. I also started to read a book called FREE GRACE SOTERIOLOGY which takes an opposing view. I will get back to it soon.
     
  13. JonC

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    This is an excellent picture of what I mean, John. In your testimony you relate your struggles with alcohol...particularly "Mikes Hard Lemonade." You said that you prayed to God for His help, and realized that alcohol was not a sin in itself, but was for you. However, you seem to have changed your "views"...not that alcohol is a "sin", for you acknowledged that Scripture did not prohibit drinking...but that it was OK for you to drink despite the problems of your past and your calling to God to help you abstain. You looked for a truth and found it from people like Gentry. I'm not saying that Gentry was wrong, but that you are not looking to learn. You are looking for someone to tell you what you want to believe and accepting what they say if it suits you.
     
  14. Crabtownboy

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    Read:

    1. Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    2. Paul Tillich
    3. Martin Bauber
    4. Karl Barth
    5. Emil Brunner
    6. Martin Marty
    7. Jurgen Moltmann
    8. John Howard Yoder
    9. N. T. Wright
     
  15. Deacon

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    Hope you're kidding! if not it's because you only think it's a fish story!
    Classic works are deep on a different level.

    Novels are fictionalized stories with an underlying message - just as biblical history is not just history but contains deep truth.

    Dune (Frank Herbert) is one of my favorite theology books!
    Who can read about the Gom Jabbar without understanding the sacrifice of a simple choice? ... are you human or not?

    The top-level of my fiction bookshelf includes quite an eclectic variety of MY deep theo-fiction: Les Miserables, The Count of Monte Cristo, The Grapes of Wrath, Moby Dick, Pilgrims Progress, The Promise, Frankenstein, LOTR, The Silmarillion, The Once and Future King, Mountain Man (Vardis Fisher), Far Pavilions (Kaye), The Good Earth, Beauty (McKinley)

    Each time I read these I get new insights into myself and the characters.

    They may be easy to read but some quiet meditation may be required to understand the message.

    ************

    John, keep on reading!
    I don't agree with you on a lot of things (so what!)
    I like your spunk, your dedication!
    I know God will teach you and you will grow in him.

    You have a passion to evangelize - God will mature that passion as he works in your life.
    I'd suggest putting aside the C/A debates you seem so attracted to; they are an unproductive, divisive distraction.
    Use the passion God gave you to develop yourself in evangelism.
    Read everything you can on it - become an expert in the various ways to evangelize.
    Find out not only what how you like to evangelize but what works for others as well.

    As you develop your passion it will direct you down paths of theology that will unexpectedly come alive.

    You will find the "deep" stuff is really interesting when it matches what you are passionate about.

    Rob
     
    #15 Deacon, Sep 1, 2014
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  16. Crabtownboy

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    I hope he was kidding just as you Deacon. A book does not have to be a "theological" book to speak on deep moral, ethical and/or theological topics. Dorothy Sayers, J. R. R. Tolkien, Flannery O'Connor and Madeleine L'Engle are examples who have written deeply on these topics.

    Generally overlooked, but one of the deepest moral lesson taught in any book is the incident in Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. In this book for the first time in American history an African American is shown to be an individual of worth.

    Huckleberry Finn has written a note that he plans to pass on to an authority telling where Jim, the runaway slave is hiding. In his society this is the proper thing to do. His Christian preacher says so, slave owners say so, the law says this is what he should do. But, he has come to realize that Jim is a person of worth, just like he is and at the last moment Huckleberry rips up the note, saying, "All right, then I'll go to hell."

    He goes against everything he has been taught by his society and his church and does the right, the Christian thing. He protects another person.

    We in our lives at times must make the decision of doing what our church or our society says we are to do or to do what is morally and ethically right, the Christian thing. Each person must decide for themselves and it is most difficult.


     
    #16 Crabtownboy, Sep 1, 2014
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  17. Greektim

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    I'm not saying that. I'm just not sure what your criteria would be to call something deep. The 3 you mentioned above are names I've never heard you speak about. Just an observation.
     
  18. Greektim

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    I read the twilight books... twice.

    [my man card was revoked]
     
  19. Greektim

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    In that order?
     
  20. JonC

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    :eek: I'll never picture you the same Greektim. :tear:
     

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