Democrats that get it. What a refreshing moment.

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Revmitchell, Feb 3, 2009.

  1. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    Eleven Democrats voted against H.R. 1, the President’s $816 Billion economic package, but the national media hasn’t told us their reasons.

    Congressman Bobby Bright (D-Ala., 2nd), said he resisted hours of “very pointed and heated discussions” from fellow Democrats and felt he was being rushed into a decision.[1]

    “From what I was able to review along with my staff,” Rep. Bright said in explaining his opposition vote, “this became a spending bill and not a stimulus bill.”[2]

    Speaker Pelosi made a deliberative vote even more difficult by changing the procedural rules for H.R. 1: skipping the normal committee review process; waiving all points of order for it; limiting debate on the 1,588 page bill to only 3½ hours; and forcing a vote without any motions or changes being allowed.[3]

    “Congress messed it up,” bluntly retorted Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn., 5th).[4] “[H]aste may make for a lot of waste, and many proposals being considered as part of the recovery plan are clearly designed to promote economic growth for the longer term, where haste is not necessary, and waste is not justified.”[5]

    Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-Ind., 8th) was concise: “[T]here were far too many provisions that would provide little to no economic stimulus.”[6]

    “We need to jumpstart our economy and create new jobs, but this bill does not do enough to cut taxes, support small businesses or invest in our research and development programs,” agreed Rep. Parker Griffith, (D-Ala., 5th).[7]

    Because of his seniority, Paul Kanjorski (D-Penn., 11th) was one of the few granted time in the debate: “My Republican colleagues raise a reasonable objection that they were not fully included as the framework of this legislation was constructed. Perhaps I am one of the few Democrats who will acknowledge publicly that most Democrats were also not included. This is wrong.”[8]

    Frank M. Kratovil (D-Md., 1st) cautioned: “We’re already facing the largest budget deficit in our nation’s history. That means we can’t afford to get this wrong. We need to make some tough choices about where we can and can’t afford to be spending taxpayer money, and I’m not convinced that this package focused enough of its spending on the programs most likely to have a short-term economic impact.”[9]

    “I just think it could have been written better,” said Rep. Walt Minnick (D-Idaho, 1st). “I think a stimulus bill that promotes job growth would aim every nickel of money toward job creation. This bill does not.”[10]

    Rep. Allen Boyd (D-Fla., 2nd) cast his Nay vote because, “In order to fund the plan, the government will have to borrow the money adding an estimated $347 billion in interest payments to service the debt, which means that the actual, long-term cost of the stimulus package is $1.2 trillion.”[11]

    Rep. Collin Peterson, (D-Minn., 7th) took that argument a little further: “Every dollar added to this bill will have to be borrowed from countries like China and Japan, because we don’t have the money to pay for it ourselves. … At some point, this global recession is likely to dry up the credit we’re relying on to finance these programs, and I’m afraid we will see skyrocketing interest rates that will make our economic situation even worse.”[12]

    “This investment should focus on green jobs,” said Rep. Heath Shuler (D-N.C., 11th), “highways and bridges, railways, a modernized electrical grid, and broadband Internet: infrastructure projects that create jobs and make America more completive globally. In my opinion, the legislation before the House today contained too much additional spending in areas that will not offer immediate economic stimulus.”[13]

    “I don’t think it’s worth the $800-billion price tag. I do think there are lower cost ways to stimulate the economy,” Rep. Gene Taylor, (D-Miss., 4th) concluded.[14] “I am of the opinion that you as an individual, if you want to go borrow money, I’ll let you go borrow money. But I’m not going to go borrow money for you”[15]

    These men are the heroes of H.R. 1. It is a shame their voices aren’t being heard.


    http://www.worldviewtimes.com/article.php/articleid-4558/Brannon-Howse/J-Michael-Sharman
     
  2. ccrobinson

    ccrobinson
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    My memory's a little foggy, maybe somebody can help me remember.

    Didn't the Democrats complain about Republicans changing procedural rules for voting? Furthermore, didn't they say they were going to do business differently once they gained control? Am I "misremembering"? Whatever happened to that promise?
     
  3. Revmitchell

    Revmitchell
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    There is a thread on this topic here

    http://www.baptistboard.com/showthread.php?t=57168
     
  4. just-want-peace

    just-want-peace
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    Don't remember the exact words, but this past congress was supposed to be the "--most ethical--" congress ever!!

    Seems the public believed it enough to keep them in power this time--!!?? (Course I wonder how many of the current votes were by "proxy"?):laugh:
     

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