Differences in EETs: Acts 27:13-14

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by franklinmonroe, May 4, 2009.

  1. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe
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    Notice Acts 27:13-14 in early English translations --
    And whanne the south blew, thei gessiden hem to holde purpos; and whanne thei hadden removed fro Asson, thei seiliden to Crete.
    And not aftir miche, the wynde Tifonyk, that is clepid north eest, was ayens it. (Wycliffe)

    When the south wynde blewe they supposynge to obtayne their purpose lowsed vnto Asson and sayled paste all Candy.
    But anone after ther arose agaynste their purpose a flawe of wynde out of the northeeste. (Tyndale)

    Whan the South wynde blewe, they supposinge to haue had their purpose, lowsed vnto Asson, and sayled past all Candy.
    But not longe after, there rose agaynst their purpose a flawe of wynde, which is called the Northeast. (Coverdale)

    When the south wind blew, they supposing to obtain their purpose, loosed unto Asson, and sailed past all Candy.
    But anon after, there arose against their purpose, a flaw of wind out of the northeast ([Matthew's] Yes Word)

    When the south wynde blewe they supposynge to obtayne their purpose lowsed, unto Asson, and sayled past all Candy.
    But not long after, ther arose agayst theyr purpose, a flowe of wynde out of the northeast. (Great Bible)

    And when the Southerne winde blew softly, they supposing to atteine their purpose, loosed neerer, and sailed by Candie.
    But anon after, there arose by it a stormy winde called Euroclydon. (online Geneva 1587, agrees with hardcopy Geneva 1602 except for minor differences in spelling)

    And when the south wynde blewe softly, they supposyng to obtayne their purpose, loosed vnto Asson, and sayled past Candie.
    But not long after, there arose against their purpose, a flawe of wynde out of the northeast. (online Bishops' 1568)

    And when the South winde blew softly, they supposing that they had obteined their purpose, loosed unto Asson, and sailed past Candie.
    But not long after, there arose against their purpose, a flaw of winde out of the Northeast, which is called Euroclydon. (hardcopy Bishops' 1602)
    BTW, "Candy" (or "Candie") is the Old English term for Crete. It seems to got this name from the association of sugar production introduced by the Arabs around the 9th century.

    In Greek euros means 'east' and kludo means 'billow' or 'surge' (thus Euroclydon). Today, this Mediterranean cyclonic and tempestuous northeast wind is better known as Gregalia.

    The Greek word asson (Strong's #788) is now understood to be an adverb with the meaning of 'close' or 'near'.
     

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