Differences in Latin text? Revelation 9:11

Discussion in 'Bible Versions/Translations' started by franklinmonroe, May 26, 2009.

  1. franklinmonroe

    franklinmonroe
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    Notice that the Latin text tradition includes an additional translation of the name of the angel of the abyss that is not found in most English Protestant Bibles --

    et habebant super se regem angelum abyssi cui nomen hebraice Abaddon graece autem Apollyon et latine habet nomen Exterminans (Vulgate)

    And thei hadden on hem a kyng, the aungel of depnesse, to whom the name bi Ebrew is Laabadon, but bi Greek Appollion, and bi Latyn `he hath a name `Extermynans, that is, a distriere. (Wycliffe)

    A king, the angel of the bottomless pit; whose name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in Greek Apollyon; in Latin Exterminans, (Douay-Rheims)


    And they had a kynge over them which is the angell of the bottomlesse pytt whose name in the hebrew tonge is Abadon: but in the greke tonge Apollion. (Tyndale)

    They had as king over them the angel of the Abyss, whose name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in Greek, Apollyon. (NIV)

    They have as king over them, the angel of the abyss; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in the Greek he has the name Apollyon. (NASB)
    What is textual basis or origin of this phrase? Is it found in any Greek manuscripts?

    What other significant insertions or problems can be identified in the Latin textual tradition? I know of another at Acts 23:25 (or 24, depending upon versification).
     
    #1 franklinmonroe, May 26, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: May 26, 2009
  2. Logos1560

    Logos1560
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    In his English translation in his 1538 Latin-English New Testament, Miles Coverdale translated Revelation 9:11 as follows:

    And they had a king over them: (even the angel of the bottomless pit), whose name is in Hebrew, Abaddon, but in Greek, Apollyon, and in Latin, having the name destroyer.
     
  3. jonathan.borland

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    I don't have my big Wordsworth and White, which might shed more light on the Latin side of the issue, but their minor edition only shows two variations in the clause "et latine habet nomen Exterminans:" the Sixtine and Clementine editions both (1) omit the "et" and (2) have the pres. part. "habens" instead of "habet," which explains Coverdale's gloss "having."

    On the Greek side, I checked von Soden who reports no addition of any kind among Greek mss after "Apollyon."

    No doubt the gloss crept in on the Latin side to translate the Greek words that were merely transliterated.
     
    #3 jonathan.borland, May 26, 2009
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  4. Jerome

    Jerome
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    Codex Gigas (Old Latin) rough transcription:

    . . . anglm abyssi nom et hebraice abbadon, & ing[re]ca ling hc nomen p[re]dens.
     
  5. jonathan.borland

    jonathan.borland
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    Is this source on the web somewhere? I would like to download this if possible.
     
  6. Jerome

    Jerome
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    National Library of Sweden

    "The Old and New Testaments are given in the translation known as the Vulgate, the history of which goes back to the translation work of Jerome, one of the Fathers of the Church. But the Acts of the Apostles and the Book of Revelation here are both from an earlier translation, called Vetus Latina. These translations, made during the second half of the 4th century, represent a European textual tradition (as opposed to a North African one) and are very important evidence of the earliest versions of the Latin Bible."
     

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