Do you condsider...

Discussion in 'Pastoral Ministries' started by SaggyWoman, Dec 25, 2002.

  1. SaggyWoman

    SaggyWoman
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    If you are a pastor or church staff member, do you consider yourself on call on Christmas day?
     
  2. Rev. Joshua

    Rev. Joshua
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    Certainly, but not for run-of-the-mill stuff. If the copier's broken, call me tomorrow. If someone dies, I'll get my coat. We also do a midnight service on Christmas Eve, so I'm obviously on call then.

    Grey areas come into play with (hypothetical) folks like Mrs. Viebelfester who is a widow without children who calls periodically sobbing because of her lonliness. How much of my family time do I give up to provide pastoral care for her?

    One of the hard truths of joining the clergy is that, with a few exceptions, you work holidays. It's not a bad idea to set aside separate off day that is purely family time before or after a holiday.

    Joshua

    [ December 25, 2002, 07:35 PM: Message edited by: Rev. Joshua ]
     
  3. Jim1999

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    Considering the Christmas season also claims the largest number of suicides, I should think the pastor ought to be available...if we can only save one.

    In the "old days" pastors took a long time to learn how to remember his family, and they were often sacrificed on the altar of attention to the needs of others. Fortunately, pastors are either getting smarter or lazier, and I shall lean on the former, and remembering their families. This only fuels a healthier ministry overall.

    I always remember the advice given to me early on: Whatever you are in ministry; be available.

    Cheers,

    Jim
     
  4. jonmagee

    jonmagee
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    the short answer is yes. Particularly in churches that do not have a team of ministers there is a sense of always being on call.Though as Jim has indicated, other than that we must ensure time for the family.

    yours, Jon.
     
  5. TaterTot

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    yes, we are always on call, but we do reserve family time and our church respects that.
     
  6. blackbird

    blackbird
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    I'm ridin' in on ya'lls shirttails--on call, yes!! We have a 6pm Christmas Eve service--in which I am in charge--then one of the deacon's has a little family gettogether--in which I and my family are always invited--finger food type stuff--family fellowship---that is part of the "fringe" of being "on call"--if a tragidy happens on Christmas Day--accidents involving hospital stays--car wrecks,etc--certainly ole Blackbird will be there---but by in large--the office will be closed on Christmas Eve and Christmas--but the phone is there for the kind of emergencies that Brothers Joshua and Jim and that Sister TaterTot mentioned--I'll be with my family if anyone calls---but if there is trouble at the church---plumbing, airconditioning, etc--call me Monday!!!

    Your friend,
    Blackbird
     
  7. Jonathan

    Jonathan
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    I am neither a pastor or church staff member but I'll weigh in anyway. [​IMG]

    As a pastor's son (and son-in-law, cousin, brother-in-law, etc...), I am well aware of the demands that are made on the pastor and his family, especially during the holidays.

    Show me a pastor who is overly burdened by church members, parishioners, etc... during the holidays and I'll show you a pastor who has not properly lead his church to establish a serious Sunday school or small group program.

    In churches where such organizations exist, the pastor is no longer the only option when ministry needs arise. Plus, these opportunities tend to work wonders in developming lay leadership qualities...as well as build an understanding among the laity of just how busy a pastor's life (and the toll this takes on the family) is.

    A brief example from my father's experience:

    A man (who was the head of a fairly prominent church family) was constantly criticizing my father for the perceived time spent "at work" and would usually lead the charge, each fall, to reconsider the salary package.

    This man became a Sunday school teacher and a deacon in the same year. My father instituted a significant deacon training program that lasted about a year. After spending some consistent timem involved in actual ministry, this man not only became a valued member of the ministry "team" but he gained some valuable insight into the lives of those folks who seem to only work two days per week.
     
  8. broallison

    broallison
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    A pastor who is not on call for real emergencies is not a real shepherd, but a hireling. :rolleyes: Doctors are on call, (or at least used to be). And my responsibility to those God has given me to pastor is far greater. [​IMG]
     
  9. MissAbbyIFBaptist

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    Well I'm obviously not a pastor, but I do do some work in the church {cleaning, decorating,visitation, whatever needs doing} and am extremly close to the members, and I'd give them my very life if they ever needed it.
    I think it depends on what someone is calling about. Death, sickness, someone wanting to be saved,those things, I would drop whatever I was doing and be there for that person.
    I think you need to look at each situation diffrently.
    Now if you have a death or illness in your family and you call your preacher on a holiday and he says "I'll get back to you tomorrow" You might want to look into another church! :eek:
    Anyways, I think it varies with each situation.
    In Christ, Abby
     
  10. Jonathan

    Jonathan
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    As long as you understand (and embrace) that your responsibilities as a husband and father come before your responsibilities as pastor.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    I am "on call" since that is what a pastor does, 24/7. Even on holidays.

    FOR EMERGENCIES, not for ice tea sippin' or being a kind shoulder to lean on.

    Folks in my church know I will be there when I find out they have a real need. If they would like to chit-chat, I have hours posted and they come (they really do).

    I am NOT a casual friend or resident shrink. I am a professional minister. The respect they will have for me professionally will show in the relationship IF I require it.

    Now, I am open for ice tea sippin' quite regularly, but even such time is scheduled so that it will not conflict with spousal and parental responsibilities.
     

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