Dr. John Stott: A Gift to the Church?

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by TCGreek, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    1. Dr. John Stott is an Anglican clergyman, who is in his 9th decade---I discovered this while reading his lastest, The Living Church: Convictions of a Lifelong Pastor.

    2. I've always enjoyed the writings of John Stott, for I find him to be a careful exegete of Scripture.

    3. Despite his Anglicanism I've found myself agreeing a whole lot with Dr. Stott, and I think he is a gift to the church of our Lord.
     
  2. Bible-boy

    Bible-boy
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    I like his book, The Cross of Christ.
     
  3. trustitl

    trustitl
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    Dr. John Stott

    A few quotes I found attributed to John Stott:

    "The visible unity of all professing Christians should be our goal…and evangelicals should join others in the Church of England in working towards full communion with the Roman Catholic Church.
    To the 1977 National Evangelical Anglican Congress at Nottingham.


    "Speaking to the 2000 Evangelicals attending the 2nd National Evangelical Anglican Congress in England, [April] 1977, Stott said: ‘The visible unity of all professing Christians should be our goal ... and Evangelicals should join others in the Church of England in working toward full communion with the Roman Catholic Church’" (Arthur Johnston, Battle for World Evangelism, p. 328). Christianity Today for July 8, 1977, confirmed this statement. From 1977 to 1984, Stott was a key participant in the Evangelical-Roman Catholic Dialogue In Mission. One of Stott’s co-workers, Michael Harper (formerly assistant curate at All Souls Church where Stott is pastor), wrote the 1977 book, Three Sisters, which contends that the "Three Sisters"—Evangeline (the Evangelicals), Charisma (the Charismatics), and Roma (the Roman Catholic Church)—should be reconciled.
     
  4. TCGreek

    TCGreek
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    Is Stott one of the ECT signers?
     
  5. PastorSBC1303

    PastorSBC1303
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    His book on preaching Between Two Worlds is excellent!
     
  6. Matt Black

    Matt Black
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    Well, as a fellow evangelical(-ish!) Anglican, it pretty much goes without saying that I've got a lot of time for John Stott.
     
  7. trustitl

    trustitl
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    John Stott

    I don't think so.

    I found a couple more references to Stott surrounding this issue. I'm not commenting on him since I don't know anything about him, I just find it disturbing what happens to people when they "become somebody". These men (and women) often have much truth and can be real blessings in our lives but I like to say "that can often be the bait in the trap".

    James 3:1 "My brethren, be not many masters, knowing that we shall receive the greater condemnation."

    The first and second National Evangelical Anglican Conferences that met at Keele and Nottingham in the UK in 1967 and 1977, respectively, were primed to launch, and further, the new policy of Anglican evangelicals towards ecumenism. There was a new desire on the part of new evangelicals to be united with ritualistic Anglicans, essentially Roman Catholic in belief and practice; and liberals who believed in a fallible Bible. Leading evangelicals, such as John Stott and J.I. Packer endorsed the statements from these conferences and in so doing; set aside Gospel truth in favor of accepting fellow Anglicans as true brothers and sisters in Christ. John Stott, who chaired the first Conference at Keele, made clear that the Conference was accepting not only Anglo-Catholics and liberals, but Roman Catholics also: - “All who confess the Lord Jesus Christ as God and Saviour according to the Scriptures and therefore seek together to fulfill their common calling to the glory of one God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit have a right to be treated as Christians, and it is on this basis that we wish to talk with them.” The conference at Nottingham went further than Keele, giving the compromise already proclaimed a complete seal of approval. Nottingham also endorsed and praised the Charismatic movement and is remembered for David Watson’s reference to the Reformation as ‘one of the greatest tragedies that ever happened to the church.’
    Source:
    http://www.rapidnet.com/~jbeard/bdm/exposes/packer/general.htm

    In 1988 InterVarsity Press published Evangelical Essentials: A Liberal-Evangelical Dialogue. The evangelical was John R.W. Stott and the liberal was David Edwards, who rejects the fall of man and the atonement and bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ. Stott said heretics such as this “do not forfeit the right to be called Christians” (Iain Murray, Evangelical Essentials, p. 228).

    Source
    http://www.wayoflife.org/fbns/fundamen2.htm
     
  8. NaasPreacher (C4K)

    NaasPreacher (C4K)
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    Basic Christianity - pure and simply a classic
     
  9. tank1976

    tank1976
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    I just started reading the Cross of Christ.

    It is for class I am taking.
     

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