Early Baptistries

Discussion in 'Baptist History' started by Dr. Bob, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. Dr. Bob

    Dr. Bob
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    http://blog.togetherforthegospel.org/

    Great pix of baptistries (for immersion) from the 4th Century and article on Ambrose/Augustine (it was the baptistry in which Augustine was immersed). Worth a read.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Brother Bob

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    Very interesting Dr. Bob; especially since Old Regular Baptist have only a handful of baptistries and most, if not all of them are on the outside of the Church. I don't think we have one on the inside for it has been frowned on ever since I been around. I notice that this one is on the inside and is very big. It must of took some time to fill it with water and probably the water seeped into the ground pretty quick. Of course if they lined it with clay, it would hold water for a long time.

    I find this to be very interesting and it must of been the Catholics who had these baptistries back in 4 AD, am I right or not?

    Being there were so much "public bathing" in Rome in those days, I wonded how they know this is not a tub for public bathing being it was so large?
     
    #2 Brother Bob, Jun 6, 2007
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2007
  3. rsr

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    Thanks, Dr. Bob. Cool pix.

    I would prefer not to use that term. The top photo on the link is generally known as the Orthodox Baptistry or the Neon Baptistry (for a bishop of that name) to distinguish it from another baptistry later constructed for the Arians in Ravenna.

    The pictures are a reminder that immersion was the accepted form of baptism everywhere in antiquity.

    The excavation in Milan uncovered a circular pool with a diameter of about 10 feet. That would be far too small for a public bath.

    In the case of the Orthodox Baptistry in Ravenna, the structure was in fact built over what had been the "hot room" of a public bath, a sensible decision in that water could be piped into the baptistry and heated.
     
  4. Bro. James Reed

    Bro. James Reed
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    Well, they certainly weren't Baptist.

    Heated water for baptizing? How absurd. Everyone knows a baptism only counts if the water is below 40 degrees.

    :laugh:
     
  5. rsr

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    Are you sure? Most Baptist preachers I know are in hot water about something or the other most of the time ...
     

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