Easter-Truely A Christian Holy Day

Discussion in '2005 Archive' started by Glory2God, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. Glory2God

    Glory2God
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    YES HANK D!!!! LET'S!!!!!LISTEN UP CRANSTON!!!

    Is the word "Easter" an error in the King James Bible?
    In Acts 12:3 we are told of Peter being taken prisoner by Herod. “Then were the days of unleavened bread. And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four quaternions of soldiers to keep him; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people.”
    The Greek word translated as Easter is pascha. Some say the word should only be translated as Passover and not Easter. The KJV is not alone in translating this word as Easter. The Tyndale 1525, Bishop’s Bible 1568, Coverdale 1535, Matthew’s, Cranmer, the Great Bible (which preceeded the KJB), Mace's New Testament 1729, and Martin Luther also translated this word as Easter. The Geneva New Testament was first published in 1557 and read "Easter" in Acts 12:4. When the Old Testament was published in 1560, the New Testament was revised and at that time "easter" was changed to "passover." Likewise the modern KJV 21st Century Version and the Third Millenium Bible both read "after Easter" in Acts 12:4.
    Words can acquire new meanings with changing circumstances and be applied in new ways. When you turned on your computer, you used your “mouse”. Some argue the word pascha does not mean Easter in Greek but any modern Greek dictionary will tell you the way to say Easter is Pascha.
    Most of us know how to say Merry Christmas in Spanish. Feliz Navidad. But millions of Spanish speaking people also say Happy Easter with the words Feliz Pascuas, the very same Greek word. This word also means Easter in Latin, French, Italian, Dutch and Swedish.
    Why would this word become Easter for the English speaking people? The word pascha is translated all other times in the KJB as passover, referring to the annual Jewish feast of offering a lamb to God to commemorate their deliverance out of slavery in Egypt.
    Yet after the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, this word is used only twice, once here and once in 1 Corinthians 5:7, where we are told, “For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us.” Tyndale’s Bible actually says, “For Christ our Easter lamb is offered up for us.”
    It makes no sense at all to believe that Tyndale, Martin Luther, Cranmer, Coverdale, Matthews, the Great Bible, and the Bishop’s Bible were referring to a pagan deity of the spring called Eastre or Ishtar when they called Christ the easterlamb.
    It is likewise grammatically absurd to think Easter refers to a pagan deity in Acts 12:4 where it says, “intending after Easter to bring him forth unto the people”. Try substituting another name there and see how it sounds. Intending after Buddha to bring him forth, or intending after Krishna to bring him forth to the people.
    Believers who say that Easter was a pagan holiday use the argument that Passover occurred before the days of unleavened bread, and so the Passover had already taken place. However in Luke 22:1 we see that the entire feast of 7 days was collectively called the Passover. “Now the feast of unleavened bread drew nigh, which is called the Passover.” The term Passover may also refer to the entire week, including the 7 days of unleavened bread after the lamb was slain every year.
    This is also confirmed in Ezekiel 45:21 - "In the first month, in the fourteenth day of the month, ye shall have the passover, a feast of seven days; unleavened bread shall be eaten."
    The KJB is actually the most accurate translation, in that it uses the word passover before the death and resurrection of Christ and then Easter the only time the word occurs in the book of Acts after His resurrection.
    Some say the word Easter comes from the name of the goddess Ishtar or Eastre. The truth is found in any good dictionary that both Eastre and Easter come from the word East, but they are not related to each other in meaning. The sun rises in the east, to bring the light of a new day, and we are told concerning Christ in Malachi 4:2, “But unto you that fear my name shall the SUN of righteousness arise with healing in his wings.”
    I also disagree with the idea that it was Herod who wanted to wait till after an alleged celebration of a pagan deity called Ishtar or Astarte. There is no historical evidence that Herod or anyone else in Jerusalem celebrated Ishtar at this time.
    I think a more reasonable explanation lies in the fact that at the time of the Passover celebration, there were multitudes of both Jews and Gentile proselytes present in Jerusalem. Herod knew that if he brought forth Peter to be killed before the assembled masses, they would have to make public the accusations laid against him. Peter might well preach a sermon in his defense. Peter had already preached sermons with the result that 3000 were converted at Pentecost and another 5000 on a later day. If several thousands more believed the preaching of Peter about Christ and the resurrection, he might well have a riot on his hands. Perhaps Herod thought it better to wait till the multitudes had gone home after the Passover week, and then deal with Peter in a quieter fashion.
    It is not that Herod himself was celebrating an alleged "Ishtar", or the Jewish Passover or what would come to be called the Christian Easter. Rather, it is the Holy Ghost speaking here in Acts 12:4 and telling us what this Passover celebration would come to signify for the believers in a risen Lord Jesus Christ. Christians today do not celebrate the Passover; we celebrate Easter which commemorates the great and central event of the glorious resurrection of the Lamb of God.
    Our word EASTER is of Saxon origin and of precisely the same import with its German cognate OSTERN. The German word for Easter (Ostern) is derived from the old Teutonic form of auferstehen / auferstehung, that is - RESURRECTION." This is quoted from "Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History," translated in 1850 by C. F. Cruse, Hendrickson Publishers, p 437.
    The passover was a type of the true lamb of God who delivers His people out of the bondage of sin. Yet in the Jewish passover, there is no type of the resurrection, only the death of the lamb. The main theme of the preaching in Acts is the glorious resurrection of the lamb of God, Jesus Christ.
    The Holy Ghost is speaking here in Acts 12, and He changed the significance of the word pascha to sometimes mean Easter. After all, there was no Easter before this great event. Easter is associated with the Jewish passover as a yearly holy day. Does not the same thing occur in Scripture with what was previously called the “passover meal”? The Holy Ghost, speaking through Paul, now refers to the "passover meal" as “The Lord’s Supper" in 1 Corinthians 11:20. It is no longer celebrated only once a year but can be celebrated as many times a year as we wish. See 1 Corinthians 11:26. But only once a year do we celebrate the resurrection, and in English and many other languages, this event is called Easter.
    Some would argue that the early Christians didn’t celebrate Easter at this time, so it can not properly be called by this name but should be passover. The early Christians began very soon to commemorate the yearly event called Easter.
    Around 120 A.D., Polycarp, who was a disciple of John, went to see the Christian leader Anicetus to discuss the proper date for this celebration. Britannica.com. says, "Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, visited Rome to confer with him about the controversy over the date of Easter." Those in Jerusalem celebrated it on the moveable date of the 14th of Nisan (the Jewish passover) while those in Rome did it on the first Sunday after passover. They decided to let each group continue as they had been doing, rather than cause a split.
    Christians had obviously been celebrating Easter before 120 A.D., since they met to discuss its proper date and not the fact of its observance. God is now calling the passover Easter because of its new signifiance. He calleth those things which be not, as though they were.
    Has He not done this before in His word? Genesis 14:14 tells us that Abraham pursued those who had taken Lot captive “unto Dan.” There was not even a tribe of Israel called Dan let alone a city named after them at this time. But God knew there would be.
    In Genesis 21:14, 21, God calls the name of a place Beersheba before it is so named. In Isaiah 44:28 and 45:1, God speaks of Cyrus, my shepherd, his anointed “whose right hand I have holden, to subdue nations before him”, as though he already existed, yet Cyrus would not be born till many years later.
    Again in Romans 4:17, “As it is written, I have made thee a father of many nations, before him whom he believed, even God, who quickeneth the dead, and calleth those things which be not as though they were.” At the time Abraham had only one son, Ishmael. He was hardly a father of many nations, yet God says he had already made him a father of many nations.
    There are two other examples in the scriptures of a religious holiday being established by God’s people to commemorate a great deliverance or event. In Esther 9:26-27 we see the feast of Purim established. “Wherefore they called these days Purim after the name of Pur. The Jews ordained, and took upon them, and upon their seed, and upon all such as joined themselves unto them, so as it should not fail, that they would keep these two days according to their writing, and according to their appointed time every year.”
    The other one is found in John 10:22 were we read, “And it was at Jerusalem the feast of the dedication, and it was winter.” This feast of the dedication was instituted in 164 BC when after Antiochas Ephiphanes defiled the temple and Judas Maccaebeus rededicated it. This holiday is now called Hanukkah.
    Words can adapt to new meanings and events can obtain new significance. What was once called by one name can now be called by another. Much has changed since the victory over death and the putting away of sin; the types have been fulfilled and their significance brought to light in the face of Jesus Christ.
    I am well aware of how this original Christian celebration of Easter has been corrupted over the years with the bunnies, candies, and eggs. But these corruptions came about much later in the history of the church.
    What things of Christ and of God have not been corrupted to some degree by the world and even by the church itself? Nevertheless, there remains the central kernel of divine truth in I Cor. 15:20, that “Christ is risen from the dead and become the firstfruits of them that slept”. The word Easter in Acts 12:4 is not an error, but rather a fuller revelation of the significance of the passover lamb, His sacrifice for our sins, and His resurrection from the dead.
    Will Kinney For another article by Scott Jones which shows that Easter is the correct translation here, go to http://www.lamblion.net/Articles/ScottJones/easter_or_passover1.htm
    Easter is Correct [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. Trotter

    Trotter
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    "Will Kinney"

    Yeah, sounds about like it.

    Total waste of server space.

    In Christ,
    Trotter
     
  3. Trotter

    Trotter
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    Can any KJVO think on their own? All I see around here are links and "cut-and-paste".

    Oh, but if a KJVO actually thought, then they'd no longer be KJVO...

    In Christ,
    Trotter
     
  4. David J

    David J
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    No matter how you spin it Pascha means PASSOVER!

    What has more authority? The KJV or the Greek?

    We should follow the clear English translation of Pascha as Passover.
     
  5. James_Newman

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    unless your Spanish. You could easily make the argument that Easter and passover were synonymous to the early English church. And your average churchgoer today couldn't tell you the difference.
     
  6. Glory2God

    Glory2God
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    Trotter, [​IMG]
    You've seen my posts and you didn't read this one. Typical, I've used more scripture since I've been here than you have in the last two years(without links). When I use somebody else's work I give credit. You've never quoted anyone before?? Perhaps you don't give credit where due. Would you like me to check your last 50 posts.

    Mt 7:5 Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.

    Read it and weep before it gets edited, just like the verses "scholars" don't agree with. You do the same.At least I read an entire post before passing judgement. Amen?

    Pr 18:13 ¶ He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  7. Askjo

    Askjo
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    Right, I agree with you.

    I have Tyndale 1526 New Testament. It said, "Easter."

    Anyone of you disagree with me. Let me ask you question: Was William Tyndale wrong to put a correct word, "Easter" on the Book of Acts?
     
  8. David J

    David J
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    Ok here it is in simple English:

    Today when you hear the following what do you think about?

    Easter=

    Passover=

    Ok then now let's look at the word when it was penned in Greek:

    Pascha= Passover


    Today Easter is the term we use to celebrate the resurrection.

    Passover today means what? Come now and don't dodge the question.

    So in context the word for pascha should be passover. Even if easter meant passover 400+ years ago it does not mean the same thing today.


    Today it means:

    http://dictionary.reference.com


    Eas•ter Audio pronunciation of "easter" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (str)
    n.

    1. A Christian feast commemorating the Resurrection of Jesus.
    2. The day on which this feast is observed, the first Sunday following the full moon that occurs on or next after the vernal equinox.
    3. Eastertide.


    Pass•o•ver Audio pronunciation of "passover" ( P ) Pronunciation Key (psvr)
    n. Judaism

    A holiday beginning on the 14th of Nisan and traditionally continuing for eight days, commemorating the exodus of the Hebrews from Egypt. Also called Pesach.


    Do Jews celebrate Easter or Passover?

    In context it can only be Passover. KJVOist will twist anything in order to not see a clear error in the KJV!
     
  9. David J

    David J
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    Act 12:1 Nowe about that time, Herod the King stretched forth his hands to vexe certaine of the Church,
    Act 12:2 And he killed Iames the brother of Iohn with the sword.
    Act 12:3 And when he sawe that it pleased the Iewes, he proceeded further, to take Peter also (then were the dayes of vnleauened bread.)
    Act 12:4 And when he had caught him, he put him in prison, and deliuered him to foure quaternions of souldiers to be kept, intending after the Passeouer to bring him foorth to the people.

    Geneva 1599
     
  10. natters

    natters
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    Translation: reinspiration of scripture when English came along.

    Move over Joseph Smith, Kinney wants to sit next to you on the Beautiful Bus of the Burning Bosom.
     
  11. natters

    natters
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    No. Another question: what did Tyndale mean by the word "Easter"?
     
  12. AVBunyan

    AVBunyan
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    Cop out - this is one of the reasons why myself and others spend very little time here. I'll cut and paste all day if someone can do a better job than me - no ego here - God has called me to redeem the time. A man once said knowing where to get the information is just as valuable as knowing it. The reason many folks cut and paste is because they've read the work and feel the work is worth using. Some of you should do some cut and pasting for your "original thinking" is sadly lacking at times.

    In defense of Will Kinney - it appears he has done tons of more study and reading than many of the folks on this forum.

    What's the problem here? Too much research makes your nervous? I'll take Will Kinney's and others' research over some of the "baptist one-liners" that constantly go on here. You know how it goes - when you can't answer the content then go after the writer.

    Cheap shot Trotter - poorly done

    [ February 15, 2005, 08:59 PM: Message edited by: AVBunyan ]
     
  13. Askjo

    Askjo
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    Click: Answer to Easter vs Passover

    Click: Which one is right - Easter or Passover?
     
  14. Askjo

    Askjo
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    What did he translate on Acts 12:4?
     
  15. natters

    natters
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    What did he translate on Acts 12:4? </font>[/QUOTE]"Objection your honor. Coherency?"

    "Sustained. Mr. Askjo, please rephrase your question."
     
  16. Glory2God

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    Know how they say Happy Easter, refering to the resurection in Europe??? If you already do then shame on you for posting the way you have. I'm treating you as if you were as intelligent as your posts boast. [​IMG]
     
  17. natters

    natters
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    And all God's people said , "huh?"
     
  18. Glory2God

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    Natters,
    Not reinspiration, preservation. The original greeks who actually knew original greek knew it meant Easter.

    Let's break it down to your suprrior sophisticated level.For example, "fine" can mean payment due for breaking a law or it can simply mean very nice. I'm sure it takes two different words in Greek to convey the same meanings. This is why "Dr"Bob shouldn't promote ecclectic interpretation (I mis-spell a bunch [​IMG] )That's private interpretation according to the bible. Now get out your thinking cap and meditate on this. I love ya' all.
    An unlearned servant. [​IMG]
     
  19. Askjo

    Askjo
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    Tyndale translated, "Easter" instead of passover on Acts 12:4. WHY?

    No further question.
     
  20. natters

    natters
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    The article said the Holy Spirit changed the meaning of a Greek word (pascha) to mean an English word (Easter). This could not take place before the English word (or even language) existed.

    Let's cut the games and simply deal with the facts. Luke wrote "pascha". "Pasha" (Passover) can refer to the entire Passover week as even Kinney admits in his article. There is no need (nor evidence) of this advance revelation, this changing of meanings of the word by the Holy Spirit (who apparently forgot to tell us, but left it approx 2000 to be revealed by Mr. Kinney).

    I believe "Easter" is correct, but only because in the 14th-18th century English, it was a synonym for Passover.
     

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