Eighth Grade Exam Part 1

Discussion in 'Other Christian Denominations' started by gb93433, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. gb93433

    gb93433
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    How many of you could pass the exam?

    Eighth Grade Final Exam

    This is the eighth-grade final exam from 1895 in Salina, Kansas, USA. It was taken from the original document on file at the Smokey Valley Genealogical Society and Library in Salina, and reprinted by the Salina Journal.

    Grammar (Time, one hour)
    1. Give nine rules for the use of capital letters.

    2. Name the parts of speech and define those that have no modifications.

    3. Define verse, stanza and paragraph

    4. What are the principal parts of a verb? Give principal parts of "lie, "play," and “run."

    5. Define case; illustrate each case.

    6 What is punctuation? Give rules for principal marks of punctuation.

    7 - 10. Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

    Arithmetic (Time, 1 hour 15 minutes)

    1. Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.

    2. A wagon box is 2 ft. Deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. Wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?

    3. If a load of wheat weighs 3,942 lbs., what is it worth at 50cts/bushel, deducting 1,050 lbs? For tare?

    4. District No 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?

    5. Find the cost of 6,720 lbs. Coal at $6.00 per ton.

    6. Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.

    7. What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $20 per metre?

    8. Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.

    9. What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per acre, the distance of which is 640 rods?

    10. Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a ReceiptU.S.

    History (Time, 45 minutes)

    1. Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided

    2. Give an account of the discovery of America by Columbus

    3. Relate the causes and results of the Revolutionary War.

    4. Show the territorial growth of the United States

    5. Tell what you can of the history of Kansas.

    6. Describe three of the most prominent battles of the Rebellion.

    7. Who were the following: Morse, Whitney, Fulton, Bell, Lincoln, Penn, and Howe?

    8. Name events connected with the following dates: 1607, 1620, 1800, 1849, and 1865.


     
    #1 gb93433, Apr 7, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 7, 2008
  2. Sgt. Fury

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    Thanks to the dumbing down of America by the public school system, I doubt today's graduate student could do much with that.
     
  3. Ed Edwards

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    In the late 1960s I was in a church. The Financial committee seemed amazed to find that I could figure out that if they wanted to spend $27,000 for salaries office costs and building costs plus 10% of the Tithes & Offerings to missions. I was a college student getting a Secondary Education degree majoring in mathematics. l (this isn't rocket science /which I can also do, you know :)/ ).

    I can do it in my head. The total budget needed to raise would be $30,000.
    (if it had of been $28,000 and 12%, I'd have to jot a few numbers down. These committee members were the smartest business men in church.
     
  4. I Am Blessed 24

    I Am Blessed 24
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  5. gb93433

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    I wonder how many home schooled kids could pass that test?
     
  6. Ed Edwards

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    Here is one they never would have gotten in Kansas in 1895:

    Name the winners of the first twelve Super Bowls. Half the guys in High School also know both the team's lead quarter back.

    When I taught the 10th grade's Geometry class, the hardest time I had teaching was: Some of you know more tlhan some of your teachers about a particuar subject. My problem was I'd taken a graduate course where I made 10.3 on a spelling test (at the 3rd month of the 10th grade, half the 10th graders could spell better than I could).
     
    #6 Ed Edwards, Apr 8, 2008
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  7. donnA

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    Thank you Sue, why people insist on spreading untrue unjunk, and others treating it as if it were true I don't know.
     
  8. Salty

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    There is some truth to the story, if I remember correctly the test was for prospective teachers. I was trying to find the reference on truth or fiction. But for the most part there is very little truth to it.
     
  9. Chemnitz

    Chemnitz
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    I thought the test was laughable, asking kids in 1895 to describe scientific principles concerning the climate. when considering much of what we know concerning the climate is a product of the 20th century.
     
  10. EdSutton

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    Without seeming to brag, in either case, my bride was the HS Valedictorian for a graduating class of around 700, and did extremely well in college. (R.N.) She is very intelligent, obviously, and exceptionally talented to boot, and seen as outstanding in all her fields, as she is a highly trained cardiac-care nurse/Clinical manager at a large regional Medical Center (Whenever my bride is at work, she is the one in charge of the cardiac unit, and she is usually the one who takes the toughest patients, as a rule.); she builds and flies her own fairly large model airplanes, including rebuilding the motors herself, when necessary; does photography at a professional level; and is a computer expert, and can build, assemble, rebuild, and teaches computer classes, sometimes at the hospital where she works. (She was on-call for Y2K, had there been a problem.) I fully have my doubts that she could make, or ever have made, above an 80-85% on this alleged test.

    (FTR, I am a farmer and am also seen out standing in all my fields.) :thumbs:
    Without bragging, the consensus of opinion was that I was easily qualified (as was Bobby, below) to be "MENSA material", when I was in HS and college, although I never pursued it. And I was easily considered to be in the top 10% of my HS class of 110. MY SATs and ACTs showed I was easily qualified for admission to any college, anywhere, that used these tests for admission.

    I seriously doubt that I could have possibly made a 75% here, even then, were my life to depend on it. A fellow schoolmate of mine named Bobby (the HS Salutatorian) and I went to the same university (~25,000 students) where when we both had "ordinary" freshman college chemistry, and although in different lecture classes, we had the same labs and were "lab mates". At the end of our freshman year, all students had to take an overall comprehensive chemistry lab test. There were close to 1000 students in freshman college chemistry, that year. (The grad student teachers, and the director of the labs, also took the test annually, for comparison.) The test was so tough, that a perfect "raw score" was 50. Bobby and I managed to rank as No. 2 & 3, where I actually beat him for the second spot by .25 points, at 39.75 and finished, myself .50 behind the student who did first place, who had easily led the class in the far more difficult "honors" chemistry, section. Both Bobby and I topped some of the grad-assistant, aspiring Ph.D.s. and the long-time lab director, who could spout this stuff off in his sleep, actually scored a 40.75, and admitted that it was better than he had done on the comparable test, the previous year.

    I said all that, merely to say this. We were a right "fair-to-middlin'" bunch of students. Overall, our 1966 HS class, from top to bottom, was considered, at that time, to be far and away the best to ever graduate from the Garrard County High School.

    So what, that we were only the 2nd graduating class. :laugh: :laugh:

    Ed
     
    #10 EdSutton, Apr 8, 2008
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  11. gb93433

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    Could it be that is because they could see the stadium from almost anywhere in the state?
     
  12. gb93433

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    In antiquity, I spent my first two years as a physics major. A few years ago I took a look at some of the labs I did and could not even follow the math. It was quite humbling. I have not done any calculations like that in about twenty years.
     
  13. hillclimber1

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    My own education in public schools beginning in the early 50's was vastly superior to todays.
    We have several text books from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including many McGuffey Readers. They are absolutely far better teaching aides than anything else I've seen taught in my life time.
     
  14. hillclimber1

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    My wife, and I and most of our classmates ('65')can perform general math, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, etc. and can figure out most problems, as they come up... We've had children and friends children in public schools all these years, and have seen first hand the deliberate movement in mathematics, science and even physics, that confuses, and demoralizes children. It is way too far off to be anything but deliberate...

    We have many Christian friends that are teachers, and my own father was a life long educator. Not all of them, including my dad, see the problems, but many do....
     
    #14 hillclimber1, Apr 9, 2008
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  15. gb93433

    gb93433
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    My daughter has had many Christian teachers in the public school. In fact at one school they would not allow Halloween decorations. Quite a number of Christians taught there.

    I had calculus in high school and my daughter is a senior in high school and she is ahead of where I was.

    There is a local Christian school but it does not have very many students.

    I teach at a university and all of the philospohy professors are Christians. Several in our department are Christians. They are evangelical too. There seems to be a lot of respect for Christians in our department. I think it is because the Christrians are humble and living the Chrisitan life. The church I go to is outstanding. I have never seen such quality leadership who are zealous and are quite knowledgeable.

    I think it depends a lot on the Christians on the inside and in the community.

    If a professor is not a conservative he will not stay.

    How is your job going?
     
  16. Jon-Marc

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    I know I couldn't.
     
  17. hillclimber1

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    My hope would be that your situation is normal and ours is abnormal, but I'm sure that's not the case.....We will always have the standout students like your daughter, and my son, but the average student today would have never graduated from my high school. period..
     
  18. FriendofSpurgeon

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    I guess it all depends on where you live & the public/private schools in that particular area. We have excellent high schools in the area - both public & private - with many more programs and programs that are at a much higher level than my own public high school (30 years ago). As a general rule, the students today come out with a much broader and better education than I did.
     
  19. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Some parents I have talked with from the pacific northwest have the attitude that schol should be fun. I tell people that learning is work and the fun is the reward.
     

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