Empire's Double Edged Sword: Global Military + NGOs

Discussion in 'Politics' started by poncho, Jun 23, 2012.

  1. poncho

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    Mar 30, 2004
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    Tearing down sovereign nations & replacing them with global system administrators. by Tony Cartalucci

    Part 1: Imperialism is Alive and Well

    February 18, 2012 - The British Empire didn't just have a fleet that projected its hegemonic will across the planet, it possessed financial networks to consolidate global economic power, and system administrators to ensure the endless efficient flow of resources from distant lands back to London and into the pockets of England's monied elite. It was a well oiled machine, refined by centuries of experience.

    While every schoolchild learns about the British Empire, it seems a common modern-day political malady for adults to believe that reality is organized as their history books were in school - in neat well defined chapters. This leads to the common misconception that the age of imperialism is somehow a closed-chapter in human history. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. Imperialism did not go extinct. It simply evolved.

    Imperialism is alive & well

    There are several pertinent examples illustrating how imperialism is still alive and well, and only cleverly disguised with updated nomenclatures. What we know today as "free trade" actually derives its origins from economic concessions the British frequently extorted from nations under its "gunboat diplomacy" strategy - that is, anchoring gunboats off the coast of a foreign capital, and threatening bombardment and military conquest if certain demands were not met.

    In the mid-1800's, Thailand, then the Kingdom of Siam, was surrounded on all sides by colonized nations and in turn was made to concede to the British 1855 Bowring Treaty. See how many of these "gunboat policy" imposed concessions sound like today's "economic liberalization:"

    1. Siam granted extraterritoriality to British subjects.
    2. British could trade freely in all seaports and reside permanently in Bangkok.
    3. British could buy and rent property in Bangkok.
    4. British subjects could travel freely in the interior with passes provided by the consul.
    5. Import and export duties were capped at 3%, except the duty-free opium and bullion.
    6. British merchants were to be allowed to buy and sell directly with individual Siamese.

    A more contemporary example would be the outright military conquest of Iraq and Paul Bremer's (CFR) economic reformation of the broken state. The Economist enumerates the neo-colonial "economic liberalization" of Iraq in a piece titled "Let's all go to the yard sale: If it all works out, Iraq will be a capitalist's dream:"

    1. 100% ownership of Iraqi assets.
    2. Full repatriation of profits.
    3. Equal legal standing with local firms.
    4. Foreign banks allowed to operate or buy into local banks.
    5. Income and corporate taxes capped at 15%.
    6. Universal tariffs slashed to 5%.

    Nomenclatures aside, nothing has changed since 1855 as far as imperialist "wish-lists" go. The Economist argued, as would any 18-19th century imperialist, that Iraq needed foreign expertise to catch up, justifying the evisceration of their national sovereignty and the foreign stewardship (theft) of their resources.

    CONTINUE . . .

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