English Standard Version

Discussion in '2000-02 Archive' started by JIMNSC, Dec 16, 2002.

  1. JIMNSC

    JIMNSC
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    Although not real big on various versions of the Bible, I recently purchased an ESV and examined it against the KJV. I listened to Scourby reading the New Testament while at the same time reading the ESV. In my humble opinion it is an excellent translation. No glaring differences.

    Just wanted to share as it might help someone else determine whether or not to get one. [​IMG]

    A friend - Jim
     
  2. Clay Knick

    Clay Knick
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    That is one thing that makes the ESV
    such a useful translation. It is
    very much within the Wycliffe/Tyndale/KJV
    tradition. I use it all the time.

    Clay
     
  3. Pete Richert

    Pete Richert
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    In a short time the ESV has become my favorite and most trusted translation. I reccommend it for everyone.
     
  4. Clay Knick

    Clay Knick
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    Mine too. The NASB is next.
     
  5. Charlie T

    Charlie T
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    I hate to show my ignorance in the history of translating scripture, but are you saying that there is a conscious tradition from Wycliffe to Tyndale to the KJV?
     
  6. Keith M

    Keith M
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    I have also been impressed with the ESV. Another version I am impressed with is the New Testament of the Holman Christian Standard Bible (HCSB). The entire Bible is slated for publication in 2004. I look forward to it with anticipation!
     
  7. Clay Knick

    Clay Knick
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    I have absolutely no interest in
    debating the KJV only perspective.
    Let me say that right off the bat.
    I say this because I have seen this
    happen over and over again. I am
    responding to a very good question,
    but will not respond to comments that
    have nothing to do with this thread.

    There is a stream within
    English translations that goes
    back as far as Wycliffe. The
    KJV translators worked on their
    translation using the best Hebrew
    and Greek manuscripts available,
    but also consulted other translations.
    There are estimates that up to 90%
    of Tyndale's NT ended up in the KJV.
    I've seen lower estimates at around
    75 percent. At any rate, the percentage
    of Tyndale's translation used in the KJV
    is high. He is one of the great Christians
    of the ages.

    Modern versions like the ASV and RSV attempted
    to revise the KJV without changing too much of
    the language. While modernizing the language
    the ESV team sees the ESV as another translation
    in the historic stream of English translations
    that began with Wycliffe and continued on
    through Tyndale and the venerable KJV.

    If you are interested read the prefaces to the
    KJV and the RSV for some more information.

    Clay
     
  8. Ransom

    Ransom
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    Charlie T asked:

    I hate to show my ignorance in the history of translating scripture, but are you saying that there is a conscious tradition from Wycliffe to Tyndale to the KJV?

    Yes and no. John Wycliffe and William Tyndale shared similar political goals: they were both English Reformers who wanted, amongst other things, to make the Scriptures accessible to the laity so they could read and understand it for themselves. Both of them posed threats to the religious/political establishment of their day; Tyndale was, in fact, martyred for his translation.

    Not long after, however, Tyndale's New Testament slipped into the Church of England via the "back door," when it formed part of the Matthews Bible, the first English translation approved for use in the Church. Ultimately the Tyndale Bible became the de facto foundation for subsequent English translations, including the King James.

    So there is a connection. Not a clear and direct one, but it is there.
     
  9. Charlie T

    Charlie T
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    Thanks guys!

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Clay Knick

    Clay Knick
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    I like the ESV so much it is the Bible I
    give away as a gift and the one we give
    to new Christians.

    Clay
     

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