English Translation INFO

Discussion in '2004 Archive' started by Phillip, Oct 23, 2004.

  1. Phillip

    Phillip
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    The following quote is from the introductory pages of the Collin's Bible (KJV with apocrypha printed in 1850 by Phinney & Co).

    There is a LOT more information, but I am pulling out the part related to English translations and the KJV.

    "We will now give some account of the translations of the Bible into the English language. There have been some who have affirmed that Adelme, Bishop of Sherburn, who lived in the beginning of the eight century, translated Psalms into the Saxon tongue, That however, is uncertain, as some of the best historians make no mention of it: yet it is possible, as he was a man of great parts, and of great learning for those times, and said to be the first Englishman who wrote in the Latin language. About the same time, or a little after, Bede, commonly called the venerable Bede, translated some parts of the New Testament, some say the whole Bible, but that is not probable. Near 200 years later, king Alfred translated the Psalms into the same language. In 1382 Wickliff finished his translation of the Bible, which is yet extant: that is to say, there are copies of it in some public and private libraries. All these translations were one of the most remarkable is that of William Tyndal in 1530. The translation of the New Testament was made from the original Greek but probably the Old Testament either from the Latin of the Vulgate, or the Greek of the Septuagint. This was soon followed by the improvements of Coverdale and Mathews. By order of the King, Tonstal, Bishop of Durham, and Heath, Bishop of Rochester, made the sixth, another translation was made; two editions of which were published, one in 1549, and the other in 1551. In the reign of queer. Elizabeth another translation was made, which, being revised by some of the most learned of the Bishops, went by the name of the Bishops' Bible. This professed to be translated from the Hebrew of the Old Testament, and the Greek of the New, though in some instances, when there was a difference, it preferred the Septuagint to the Hebrew.
     
  2. Phillip

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    Chapter 2
    "This last circumstance, with some others, induced king James the first to select fifty-four persons, eminent in learning, and particularly well acquainted with the original languages in which the Old and New Testaments were written, to make a new translation of the whole Bible. In the year of 1607, forty-seven of these persons, the other seven probably having died, assembled together, and arranged themselves into committees, to each of which a portion was given to translate. They were favoured not only with the best translations, but with the most accurate copies, and the radious readings of the original text. After about three years assiduous labour, they severally completed the parts assigned them. They then met together, and while one read the translation newly formed, the rest had each a copy of the original text in his hand or some one of the ancient versions, and when any difficulty occurred they stopped, till by common consulatation it was determined what was most agreeable to the inspired Original. This translation was first published in A. D. 1610, and is the one which has been ever since that time printed by publick authority, and generally used in British dominions. It may be added with safety, that it has been generally approved by men of learning and piety of all denominations, of which its having never been superseded by any other, for two hundred years, is sufficient proof."

    Para 3

    "The publisher has only further to add, that he has made the following impression from the Oxford edition of 1784 by Jackson and Hamilton---and has been particularly attentive in the revisal and correction of the proof-sheets with the Cambridge edition of 1668 by John Field---with the Edinburgh edition of 1775 by Kincaid, and, in all variations, with the London edition of 1772 by Eyre and Strahan---that where there was any difference in words or in the omission or addition of words, among these, he followed that which appeared to be agreeable to the Hebrew of Arias Montanus, and the Greek of Arias Montanus and Leusden, and always adopted some one of the above-mentioned English copies as his authority, except in the mode of spelling, in which he has generally followed Johnson."
     
  3. Phillip

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    My point is: Does this sound like the steps of an 1850 MV or what?

    Is this something like you would read in the front of the NIV?

    Notice the textual criticism?

    Notice all of the different variations of texts named after the men who put them together?
     
  4. rsr

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    "The translation of the New Testament was made from the original Greek but probably the Old Testament either from the Latin of the Vulgate, or the Greek of the Septuagint."

    I think this is incorrect. Tyndale, from what I know, certainly translated the Books of Moses from the Hebrew, as well as some of the historical books.
     
  5. Phillip

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    rsr, just want to make myself clear. I didn't post the information in the front of the Bible as accurate fact. But, it is interesting to read what is in a Bible cover-sheet that was printed before the civil war.

    After all, this version does contain the apocrypha.

    Oddly enough, most of the old KJV Bibles that I have with print dates through the 1600's, 1700's and 1800's almost ALL have the apocrypha with the exception of the little "teacher's Bibles" printed around the civil war era. Every single "large" KJV that I have (before 1850) contains the apocrypha.

    I do know that when the KJV 1611 was translated, many scholars claim the Vulgate was used when manuscripts were missing or it was needed to break a tie between differing manuscripts.
     
  6. rsr

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    I didn't mean to imply it was your opinon, Phillip.

    There is no question that the Vulgate (or the Rheims NT, which was based on the Vulgate) contributed some renderings to the KJV, as is EVIDENT in Revelation 22:19.

    "Oddly enough, most of the old KJV Bibles that I have with print dates through the 1600's, 1700's and 1800's almost ALL have the apocrypha with the exception of the little 'teacher's Bibles' printed around the civil war era."

    Not all that surprising, except to those who think the publishers ditched the Apocrpyha entirely in the 17th century.
     
  7. Logos1560

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    I have seen a 1837 KJV edition with John Canne's marginal notes that was published at Coopertown, New York at a library. This edition
    noted that it was based on the same 4 KJV editions
    mentioned in your quote. I could list a couple
    pages of differences between this KJV edition in
    the 1800's and the Oxford edition in the Scofield Reference Bible. Many of them are only spelling, but a few of them are because this edition kept a rendering of a KJV edition older than 1769.
     
  8. manchester

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    So the Vulgate was the "uniquely inspired translation," the tie breaker that the KJV translators used as their acid test for truth?
     
  9. Dr. Bob

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    Another vote for us LVO group!! (Latin Vulgate Only) :eek: :eek:

    Great and precious God! Great and precious Word!
     
  10. Keith M

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    Great and precious God! Great and precious Word! </font>[/QUOTE]:confused:

    Say what???

    Typing in tongues again, Dr. Bob? Remember, not all of us have the luxury of knowing Latin. Paul admonished those in the early church to avoid speaking in tongues without an interpretation. I think the same should go for typing in tongues.

    ;)
     
  11. rsr

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    I lift up my eyes to the hills.
    From where does my help come?

    My help comes from the LORD,
    Who made heaven and earth.

    He will not let your foot be moved;
    He who keeps you will not slumber.

    Behold, He who keeps Israel
    will neither slumber nor sleep.

    The LORD is your keeper;
    the LORD is your shade on your right hand.

    The sun shall not strike you by day,
    nor the moon by night.

    The LORD will keep you from all evil;
    He will keep your life.

    The LORD will keep
    your going out and your coming in
    from this time forth and forevermore.
     
  12. Plain Old Bill

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    There are so many Pearls on this board it just blesses everybody.Thanks
     
  13. Phillip

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    Thank you rsr. I was busy trying to find my high school Latin book. (You know--the one I HATED in school, but now wished that I had paid attention----like "history class".) [​IMG]
     

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