exhortation to teach interns

Discussion in 'Pastoral Ministries' started by j_barner2000, Apr 28, 2003.

  1. j_barner2000

    j_barner2000
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    I am in an unpaid internship. I cannot afford to quit my full time job. I am studying through seminary extension and my pastor offered me an internship. He is grooming me for the pastoral part of ministry, as opposed to the preaching part. He said that preaching will come and a good pastor is able to minister out of the pulpet. He is very active in visitation and counselling. I am learning much more and all I have read has meant more now than ever before. How many pastors are taking the time to mentor and train a newly surrendered minister?
     
  2. Deacon

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    We have had a paid internship in the past. Not much of a salary, usually just subsistance living for the intern. The weakness for us has been that there has been no plan or agenda. We have decided not to continue the program until we have a more defined curriculum.

    I've examined the book,"Biblical Eldership" and it looks promising as a start for such a program.

    Does anyone have an internship curriculum?
     
  3. j_barner2000

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    there is one published by Seminary Extension. Fortunately, pastor has 55 or 56 years in ministry. He started me with small responsibilities, and grown my job as I have grown in experience and confidence. Of course, the Lord has blessed me tremendously. You may have to develop that based upon the candidate and the particular mentor. Much like Jesus trained his Apostles for ministry. He met each one's particular needs as the opportunity arose.
     
  4. Dr. Bob

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    I love the idea of mentoring. Every pastor should take a young man "in tow" and let him learn by doing.

    Caveat: This should ONLY be done with men who are well trained. For a pastor to think he can do the formal training AND mentor is folly - I have seen it fail time and time again.

    Get 4-5 years of education, coupla degrees, understanding of biblical languages, etc. THEN let him finish his preparation for 4-5 years UNDER the tutelage of a mature, proven pastor.

    If you live near a seminary, maybe combine the final years of training AND mentoring in your church . . . :cool:
     
  5. j_barner2000

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    so Dr. Bob, you are saying that because I have not done years of Bible college I would not be a candidate? Hmmm. I surrendered to preach at the age of 36 and have a family to support. There is no way I can quit my job and go to school full time. I am, however, studying through Seminary Extension. I had been studying the Bible for 15 years before surrendering to the ministry. would you consider me to be underqualified to serve as an intern?
    I have been serving as an intern for almost a year now. The pastor looks at my tests and comments on the answers I provide. He insisted that I do Seminary Classes to accompany the practical ministry.
     
  6. TomVols

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    I wouldn't deny ordination to a person just because they lacked educational credentials. Now if they refuse to prepare, be that formally at a seminary or Bible college or external program, or be that informally in private study under mentorship, then there's no way I'd advise to ordain someone like that to the ministry. There are enough sluggards out there now.

    Mentoring is vital to pastoral ministry. Every pastor should have one all his life. Ideally, these relationships can be forged at Bible college/seminary.

    I have some book recommendations I'd give you for ministry preparation if you want to hear them.
     
  7. j_barner2000

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    I am willing to learn. I spent a good bit of time reading about ministry, and studying the Bible. I used various studie guides and some independant study also. I wont say that I know more than a man who went to college, but the Lord has blessed me with many tools and aids along with people willing to share their learning with me.
     
  8. j_barner2000

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    Dr Bob,
    I think I may have over-reacted to you. I am sorry to come off that way. I had just had a discussion with someone with a similar veiwpoint. He just finished Bible college and seminary and was ordained. He He has no ministry experience at all and wants a pastor position at "his own church." Really makes me concerned. But anyway, he said that there is no way I can be as prepared as him without formal Bible college. I do not feel that formal school is definately better than any other style of learning.
    I have a cousin who did a similar thing. right from college and seminary went to his own pastorate. After a year or so he stepped down from that position and went to another church as associate pastor. He is doing much better after 2 years under an experienced man.
     
  9. TomVols

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    The catch is whether or not the seminary or Bible college requires practical ministry experience and mentoring. The Bible college and seminary I attended did so. Some don't, and that's to their shame. But still, it's all up to the individual. A student at a seminary or Bible college that doesn't emphasize practical experience can still get it if he chooses to. The best of all scenarios is formal education with mentoring and practical experience.
     
  10. j_barner2000

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    I agree. But I surrendered to the call of the Holy Spirit at the age of 36. ( that was aug 2002) I have to maintain a full time job to support myself and family. I have been told I don't have enough faith or I would quit my job and go to school full time, but that seems impractical. I am, in my pastor's educated opinion well grounded and ready to do seminary level training. ( I am using Seminary Extension's Independant study program) Along with this training I am involved in ministry work. It is awesome to look at the journal the pastor insisted I start keeping. I really can see the learning and growth that have taken place as a result of the training I have received. I agree, study to show yourself approved, and work under an experienced mentor. great formula for successful ministry preparation.
     
  11. Dr. Bob

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    Even if God calls someone at age 40, I would still encourage FORMAL education.

    Assuming they already had college (with philosophy, history, grammar, etc) then grad work in a seminary with formal classes in theology, homiletics, counseling, etc.

    Extension classes may be the answer. Went to grad school with a number of married men who were "back" in school to train mid-life.

    Being well prepared is never a waste of time.
     
  12. j_barner2000

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    Ok I understand. I do have a secular degree. In looking back, I assumed you said a Bible degree. I disagree about the "formal" degree, though. I have learned much from nonformal venues. I am not sure why "college" is as important as learning is. A degree does not equal competence. I guess I learn better in nontraditional ways than the traditional.
    I think the weak point of a bulletin board is that body language and tonal inflections are lost. As any effective communicator knows these elements convey a good third or more of the meaning of the words used.

    [ May 02, 2003, 02:14 PM: Message edited by: j_barner2000 ]
     
  13. Dr. Bob

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    I stated (I thought clearly) that extension/distance education might be a good answer for the middle aged man called into ministry.

    My doctoral work at Trinity was "distance ed", with 10 day courses in the summer and the rest of the work done while pastoring. (I was past 30 when I went back to school there)

    I am a SUPPORTER of non-traditional education, as long as it is REAL EDUCATION. Much of what I've seen is real 'trash' in the name of education.
     
  14. j_barner2000

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    cool. at least we agree that being interned/mentored is an important portion of training for ministry. I still believe that self-directed (spirit-directed) study can be a valid way of learning too.
    edited to fix misspelling.
     
  15. Ernie Brazee

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    Hmmm, I see some here have submitted to the religion of America. EDUCATION

    Letters behind ones name qualifies them for nothing in the Lord's work. To be qualified for the Lord's work one must spend more time in the Word of God than any other source.

    Education is helpful, but one can spend too much time learning from man and neglect learning form the Lord.

    Some of the most effective preachers have been men without "letters", just a foundation in the Word of God.

    The most ineffective were those who spent years and years in college and seminary, had so much of man's knowledge, but little knowledge of the Word of God.
     
  16. TomVols

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    Part and parcel of worldy man's knowledge is to criticize those who have "studied to show themselves approved." This is a worse religion than the one mentioned [​IMG]
     
  17. Ernie Brazee

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    Depends on what one studies. A real man of God will study that which God has provided to speak to us HIS WORDnot man's ideas.
     
  18. TomVols

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    And you saying that is an example of one of "man's ideas" [​IMG]
     
  19. j_barner2000

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    I think I understand Ernie. There are many very good books about the Bible. But, if you want to understand the Bible, you need to read the Bible, not just books about it. Books about the Bible are great tools to help understand it, but no substitute to studying it. Classes about the Bible can help you understand the Bible, too, but the tool is no substitute for the Bible. It is like this, your battery on your car goes dead, you can use a tool to remove it and install the replacement. However, the tool will not do the work of the battery. Likewise, you can use a study aid (book or class) to help understand the Bible, they cannot replace studying the Bible itself.
     

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