FIRST-PERSON: What can we learn from Mark Driscoll?

Discussion in 'General Baptist Discussions' started by gb93433, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. gb93433

    gb93433
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    The entire story is at http://www.bpnews.net/BPFirstPerson.asp?ID=30903

    NEW ORLEANS (BP)--Recently Seattle-area pastor Mark Driscoll has come under a great deal of scrutiny for his foul language and controversial sermon series on sex. I need not repeat here some of the phrases and words he has used as they are readily accessible in scripts on the Internet. Likewise, anyone can download his sermon series on the Song of Solomon from the Mars Hill Church website.

    Let me say the following at the outset: I believe our speech and behavior should be above reproach. Several motions were made at the most recent Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting that revolved around Driscoll's words and actions. To be fair to him, Driscoll has repented and asked forgiveness for his cussing. Some of Driscoll's apologies were actually encouraged by Lifeway Christian Resource's own Ed Stetzer. Driscoll has apologized for other similar incidents on various occasions.

    I think the question vexing many evangelical Christians about the figure of Mark Driscoll is the paradox we find in people like him: He claims to be "culturally relevant" while at the same time claiming to be "biblically conservative." While such labels from Driscoll may be controversial to some people, I believe that many Christians have an affinity with those labels because we want to be exactly that: reaching and being relevant to the world while holding to unchanging, biblical truths.

    I by no means intend to defend him, but I believe we have to ask this question: What can we learn from people like Mark Driscoll? I think we do need to pay attention not because of the answers he is providing but because of the questions he has identified in the culture. I believe Driscoll, in trying to be "culturally relevant," is merely trying to answer the questions he heard coming from the culture. Perhaps we need not necessarily listen to Driscoll but rather listen to the culture that Driscoll is trying to address.
     
  2. preachinjesus

    preachinjesus
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    Sooner or later some in the SBC will need to get over their Mark Driscoll complex and justify why they wasted so much time talking dirty about a man when we could cooperate to accomplish much for the Gospel. If you don't like him or his ministry move on and go reach people with the Gospel.

    I have no clue why so many people are hung up on Driscoll. He's a fine pastor and terrific witness for Christ to those who have been burned or turned away by the church. I listen to him weekly and, while I might express things differently, I can't find anything wrong with his ministry.

    btw, I really did enjoy the article and agree with the writer that our dramatically changed culture will not accept or find fulfillment in the answers from (as he puts it) "my grandmother's Sunday School class." We are seeing people who are so missiologically detatched from our common expression of church that we must speak their language with the grace of the Gospel savoring our lips. :)
     
    #2 preachinjesus, Jul 16, 2009
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 16, 2009
  3. gb93433

    gb93433
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    I think the key is that we must meet people where the are just as Jesus did. People today have gotten more and more skeptical of organized religion and TV preachers. It takes time for them to trust a genuine Christian. Sometimes that may take many years.

    When I was in high school not one of my Christian friends engaged me in any spirtual dialog. I know a lady who had changed the youth group where she lived in her church by starting some Bible studies with students she knew. That Bible study eventually turned into about 200 students on campus. Because of her the youth pastor was welcomed on the high school campus. He exuberance about Christ was obvious. She wanted people to know Christ.
     
  4. Shortandy

    Shortandy
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    I would say that I don't support they way he addresses sex in his serious but to be fair he is not using profanity. He is simply using in-your-face language that makes most us blush.

    On the issue of profanity the man has repented!

    On what we can learn from him....I would say much. Those who are Reformed will be glad to know that Driscoll holds to that view as well. He is very strong in his beliefs on women as pastor. He is strong in his views on abortion and homosexuality. He offered some wonderful teaching on why The Shack is horrible theologically. IF you were to read his books (Im reading one now) or listen to some of his messages you would find he has a sound view of the Gospel. He doesn't preach easy-believism or the prosperity junk.

    The big issue for many is his stance on alcohol. He thinks moderation is okay. If you were at the 09 SBC you would know that alcohol is big issue with many.

    I say we leave the guy alone.
     
  5. Alive in Christ

    Alive in Christ
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    As we all should. The scriptures speak to DRUNKENESS, not an occasional glass of wine with dinner, or a can of beer after cutting the grass.

    And I say that as an ex-drinker who has not had 1 drop of alchohol since the day I was born again in 1982.
     
  6. gb93433

    gb93433
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    Teenagers use direct language on that subject. They are quite direct and so should their parents be with them. They need to know where adults stand on the issue. Who better to give them direct information than the people who care the most their pastor and their parents.

    Teenagers respect the adults who give them direct answers that are the truth. Years ago when I taught high school a student brought up the subject at the beginning of class and for about 30 minutes the students asked me questions and dialoged with me. That opened the door for more personal discussions later. When adults provide correct information tjhat gives young people reasons for doing what ius right. If young people do not hear the truth, then it opens the door for lies and misinformation coming from their friends who may be misled.
     

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